GUT-CP, quantum physics

How the human eye could destroy quantum mechanics

“How the homo illuminatus eye could destroy quantum mechanics!” 😉

“The eyes chico… they never lie”– Tony Montana

‘An epoch will come when people disclaim kinship with us as we disclaim kinship with the monkeys.’ -Kahlil Gibran, mystic, poet, and artist (1883-1931)

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How the human eye could destroy quantum mechanics

At the very edge of human perception lies our eyes’ ability to perceive a single photon of light. Physicists believe this amazing feat could be a catalyst to illuminate some of our universe’s biggest mysteries.

What is the universe made of? Why are we here?

One popular theory that addresses both of these questions is called quantum mechanics. It insists the universe operates on a basis of uncertainty that relies on observation and measurement to determine reality.

It then follows that, if the universe is made up of those phenomena that are uncertain, and those that can measure them, humans would fall neatly into the latter category. If quantum mechanics turns out to be correct this could be interpreted to mean our purpose in the universe is simply to behold the beauty around us, so it can become reality.

In this version of the universe, if you were to shine a single photon of light into someone’s eye, they wouldn’t necessarily see it, but they’d “sense it.”

Alipasha Vaziri, a physicist at the Rockefeller University in New York City who both conducted and participated in experiments involving doing just that, told Nature:

The most amazing thing is that it’s not like seeing light. It’s almost a feeling, at the threshold of imagination.

And, theoretically, if you were to entangle that photon of light with another and then shine the photon at a person’s eye: they should not be able to perceive a difference.

This is because, for quantum mechanics to work as a theory, it has to explain everything that happens, including why we don’t usually perceive quantum phenomena. We trust that quantum phenomena happens, and that we don’t have to work too hard to observe it.

If we start seeing the collapse of quantum waves happening all around us, it could take up too much bandwidth in our consciousness. So, weird as it sounds, for quantum mechanics theory to work it needs to happen in the background (like source code).

In another version of the universe, the observer effect is a mere side-effect of reality and quantum mechanics doesn’t have all the answers. Basically, if quantum theory is wrong, then it doesn’t matter whether observation or measurement occurs: what will be, will be.

Here, if you were to shine a single photon in Vaziri’s eye again he’d sense it the same way. But if you entangled a photon and then beamed it onto his eye he’d perceive … something different. This would be potentially catastrophic for quantum mechanics.
Paul Kwiat, a physicist at University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign conducting similar experiments to Vaziri’s team, told Scientific American:

If you trust quantum mechanics, then there should be no difference … That would be a quite earth-shattering result.

According to the experts a single photon should appear the same to the naked eye whether its entangled or not. Because we’ve always been able to see photons, we’ve just never had a way to determine whether they were entangled or not before now.

As research continues, and physicists prepare to conduct further experiments, the consensus hypothesis seems to be that humans won’t perceive a difference. Still, until that’s proven, the questions loom large over the entire field.

It’s worth keeping in mind that there are numerous alternative theories to quantum mechanics. And, furthermore, that not being able to detect entanglement with the naked human eye doesn’t actually indicate that quantum mechanics is correct. But, as evidence continues to pile up for it, quantum mechanics remains the pervasive working theory to explain how our universe works.

So if you start seeing glitches in the matrix: you’re either seeing potential proof that quantum mechanics is wrong or you’re not in base reality – both classic Keanu or DiCaprio scenarios — either way, you should probably seek help.

The Human Eye Could Help Test Quantum Mechanics

Experiments to confirm we can see single photons offer new ways to probe our understanding of quantum reality
By Anil Ananthaswamy on July 10, 2018
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Paul Kwiat asks his volunteers to sit inside a small, dark room. As their eyes adjust to the lack of light, each volunteer props his or her head on a chin rest—as you would at an optometrist’s—and gazes with one eye at a dim red cross. On either side of the cross is an optical fiber, positioned to pipe a single photon of light at either the left or the right side of a volunteer’s eye.

Even as he verifies the human eye’s ability to detect single photons, Kwiat, an experimental quantum physicist at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, and his colleagues are setting their sights higher: to use human vision to probe the very foundations of quantum mechanics, according to a paper they submitted to the preprint server arXiv on June 21.

Rather than simply sending single photons toward a volunteer’s eye through either the left or the right fiber, the idea is to send photons in a quantum superposition of effectively traversing both fibers at once. Will humans see any difference? According to standard quantum mechanics, they will not—but such a test has never been done. If Kwiat’s team produces conclusive results showing otherwise, it would question our current understanding of the quantum world, opening the door to alternative theories that argue for a dramatically different view of nature in which reality exists regardless of observations or observers, cutting against the grain of how quantum mechanics is interpreted today. “It could possibly be evidence that something’s going on beyond standard quantum mechanics,” says Rebecca Holmes, Kwiat’s former student who designed the equipment, and who is now a researcher at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

The effort to determine whether humans can directly detect single photons has a storied history. In 1941 researchers from Columbia University reported in Science the human eye can see a flash from as few as five photons landing on the retina. More than three decades later Barbara Sakitt, a biophysicist then at the University of California, Berkeley, performed experiments suggesting that the eye could see a single photon. But these experiments were far from conclusive. “The problem with all these experiments is that they were just trying to use ‘classical’ light sources” that do not reliably emit single photons, Holmes says. That is, there was no guarantee each of these early trials involved just one photon.

Then, in 2012, came firm evidence that individual photoreceptors, or rod cells, can detect single photons—at least in the eyes of a frog. Leonid Krivitsky of the Agency for Science, Technology and Research in Singapore and his colleagues extracted rod cells from adult frogs’ eyes and performed laboratory tests showing the cells reacted to single photons. Now, “there’s absolutely no doubt that individual photoreceptors respond to single photons,” Kwiat says. That is not the same as saying those rod cells do the same in a living frog—or, for that matter, a human being. So Kwiat, along with Illinois colleague physicist Anthony Leggett and others, began envisioning tests of human vision using single-photon sources. Soon Kwiat’s group, which now included Holmes, was actually experimenting. But “we got beat on that,” Holmes says.

In 2016 a team led by biophysicist Alipasha Vaziri, then at the University of Vienna, reported using single-photon sources to show “humans can detect a single-photon incident on their eye with a probability significantly above chance.”

Kwiat’s team, somewhat skeptical of the result, wants to improve the statistics by doing a much larger number of trials with many more subjects. Their key concern is the low efficiency of the eye as a photon detector. Any incident photon has to get past the cornea, the clear outer layer of the eye, which reflects some of the light. The photon then enters a lens that, together with the cornea, focuses the light on the retina at the back of the eye. But between the lens and the retina is a clear, gel-like substance that gives the eye its shape—and this too can absorb or scatter the photon. Effectively, less than 10 percent of the photons that hit the cornea make it to the rod cells in the retina, which result in nerve signals that travel into the brain, causing perception. So getting statistically significant results that rise above chance is a daunting challenge. “We are hoping in the next six months to have a definitive answer,” Kwiat says.

That has not stopped them from dreaming up new experiments. In the standard setup a half-silvered mirror steers a photon to either the left or the right fiber. The photon then lands on one side or the other of a volunteer’s retina, and the subject has to indicate which by using a keyboard. But it is trivial (using quantum optics) to put the photon in a superposition of going through both fibers, and onto both sides of the eye, at once. What occurs next depends on what one believes happens to the photon.

Physicists describe a photon’s quantum state using a mathematical abstraction called the wave function. Before the superposed photon hits the eye its wave function is spread out, and the photon has an equal probability of being seen on the left or the right. The photon’s interaction with the visual system acts as a measurement that is thought to “collapse” the wave function, and the photon randomly ends up on one side or the other, like a tossed coin coming up “tails” or “heads.” Would humans see a difference in the photon counts on the left versus the right when perceiving superposed photons as compared with photons in classical states? “If you trust quantum mechanics, then there should be no difference,” Kwiat says. But if their experiment finds an irrefutable, statistically significant difference, it would signal something amiss with quantum physics. “That would be a big. That would be a quite earth-shattering result,” he adds.
Such a result would point toward a possible resolution of the central concern of quantum mechanics: the so-called measurement problem. There’s nothing in the theory that specifies how measurements can collapse the wave function, if indeed wave functions do collapse. How big should the measuring apparatus be? In the case of the eye, would an individual rod cell do? Or does one need the entire retina? What about the cornea? Might a conscious observer need to be in the mix?

Some alternative theories solve this potential problem by invoking collapse independently of observers and measurement devices. Consider, for instance, the “GRW” collapse model (named after theorists Giancarlo Ghirardi, Alberto Rimini and Tullio Weber). The GRW model and its many variants posit wave functions collapse spontaneously; the more massive the object in superposition, the faster its collapse. One consequence of this would be that individual particles could remain in superposition for interminably long times whereas macroscopic objects could not. So, the infamous Schrödinger’s cat, in GRW, can never be in a superposition of being dead and alive. Rather it is always either dead or alive, and we only discover its state when we look. Such theories are said to be “observer-independent” models of reality

If a collapse theory such as GRW is the correct description of nature, it would upend almost a century of thought that has tried to argue observation and measurement are central to the making of reality. Crucially, when the superposed photon lands on an eye, GRW would predict ever-so-slightly different photon counts for the left and the right sides of the eye than does standard quantum mechanics. This is because differently sized systems in the various stages of the photon’s processing—such as two light-sensitive proteins in two rod cells versus two assemblies of rod cells and associated nerves in the retina—would exhibit different spontaneous collapse rates after interacting with a photon. Although both Kwiat and Holmes stress it is highly unlikely they will see a difference in their experiments, they acknowledge that any observed deviation would hint at GRW-like theories.

Michael Hall, a theoretical quantum physicist at the Australian National University who was not part of the study, agrees GRW would predict a very small deviation in the photon counts, but says such deviations would be too tiny to be detected by the proposed experiment. Nevertheless, he thinks any aberration in the photon counts would deserve attention. “It would be quite serious. I find that unlikely but possible,” he says. “That would be amazingly interesting.”

Kwiat also wonders about the subjective perception of quantum states versus classical states. “Is there any perceptual difference on the part of the person when they directly observe a quantum event?” he asks. “The answer is ‘probably not,’ but we really don’t know. You can’t know the answer to that unless either you have a complete physical model down to the quantum mechanical level of what’s going on in the human visual system—which we don’t have—or you do the experiment.”

Robert Prevedel, a member of Vaziri’s 2016 team who is now at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Germany, is more interested in teasing out exactly where collapse actually occurs in the chain of events. Does it happen at the beginning, when a photon strikes a rod cell? Or in the middle, with generation and transmission of neural signals? Or does it happen at the end, when the signals register in conscious perception? He suggests firing superposed photons at extracted retinas and recording from different levels of visual processing (say, from rod cells or from the different types of photo cells that make up the retina) to see how long the superposition lasts.

Prevedel thinks first absorption by a rod should destroy the photon’s superposition. But “if we can see quantum [superposition] in any of the subsequent levels inside the different cell layers in the retina, or any downstream neuronal circuits even, that would be really a breakthrough,” he says. “This would be an amazing finding.”

There is, of course, an elephant in the room: human consciousness. Could conscious perception ultimately cause the collapse of the quantum state, making the photon show up on one or the other side? Prevedel doubts consciousness has anything whatsoever to do with measurement and collapse.

“Consciousness…arises in our brain as the combined effect of millions, if not billions, of cells and neurons. If there is a role of consciousness in the detection of quantum superposition, it’d involve a really macroscopic object on the level of the entire brain, i.e. a huge ensemble of atoms and electrons that make up the biological cells,” Prevedel says. “From all that we know, this kind of macroscopic object would not be able to sustain quantum [superposition].”

9/11, Anti-gravity, astro-physics, Chemistry, CIA, cosmology, Dark Matter, DNA, energy, Evolution, Futurism, Genetics, GUT-CP, Humour, hydrides, hydrino, HydrinoDollars, HydrinoEconomy, Molecular modelling, New elements, Philosophy, physics, Randell Mills, SunCell, technology

“We wage a war with no rules”… MI6, you’ve gone mental! This is between me, the CIA, Israel and Russia ONLY! (fucking muppets)

“I use to think ‘ooh be a millionaire’, then I thought ‘be a billionaire’… unless you’re talking in the T’s,, I’m not fucking interested!”

“Energy, water and phosphates… nothing else matters!”

“Energy? This guy, has discovered the energy source of the Universe, the reason the Universe is expanding, the identity of dark matter and dark energy… he’s unlocked the secrets of the atom and Universe… Quantum Physics was ALWAYS bullshit… he’s created a multi-trillion dollar industry (and not just in energy, in EVERYTHING chemical, biological), the biggest paradigm shift in human history… THIS IS THE BIGGEST DISCOVERY SINCE FIRE… for the first time in human history the power of the of the Sun has been brought down to the surface of planet Earth 😉 …

I’ve always had fun with the CIA.
I have lunch with Mossad.
… You need to ask the Russians about our relationship.
MI6 can fuck themselves.

I eat cake with Rothschild.
(best champagne in the world)

wewage

CIA, GUT-CP, Humour, quantum physics, technology

The Chinese state want to take over the world using Quantum Mechanics?… good luck with that! :D (thanks Snowden!)

“I’m not being racist!… I just find the Chinese terribly annoying. Example… you’ll be walking through London, efficiently getting from A to B in a quick and orderly fashion, and the someone in front of you will just stop! Un-expectantly, for absolutely no fecking reason at all… best believe they’ll be Chinese.

And they’re always lost! Always… no fecking idea as to where they’re going! But yet they’re always looking on they’re phone… are they on Google maps or playing fecking Pokemon? :/

AND THEN! :I The most irritating thing about them, you get on a train, and thirty plus Chinese students have managed to get lost, in the middle of a single fecking carriage, complete with all their luggage… just stuck in the centre of the carriage with two pieces of  luggage each, not knowing what to do next.
“Sowwy” “Sowwy” “Sowwy”… STOP APOLOGISING AND GET THE LUGGAGE OUT THE FECKING WAY AND FIND YOU’RE FECKING SEAT!

Yeah anyway, I personally don’t believe the Chinese state has any idea that Quantum Mechanics is the biggest load of tosh of the past 100 years… they seem to be making all these fantastic claims of Quantum computing, Quantum communication, Quantum Encryption, Quantum cryptography, Quantum Satellites, … newest one being Quantum radar.

If Quantum theory is proven to be incorrect, China is going to Quantumly fucked!

I suspect the US military complex and Western Elites are secretly pissing themselves in hysterical fits of laughter (I am)… go ahead China… go build the planets biggest tin doughnut, I mean ‘supercollider’.

(It’s not like I haven’t tried telling them… they’re so bloody paranoid, they thought I trying to throw them a strawman.)

Saying that…. was Mills’ newest scientific publication not in a Chinese journal? :/

Why China’s perfectly placed to be quantum computing’s superpower

The quantum race is on. As technological advancements progress, expect nations to be more secretive about their capabilities. At the forefront is China, which is pouring billions in quantum tech.

In August 2016, China sent the world’s first quantum satellite into space from a launchpad in the Gobi Desert. Micius, which circles the earth at an altitude of 500km, is a powerful signal of intent – a starting gun for the technological race that could define the next century.

The quantum realm

In 2013, Snowden’s leaks from the NSA revealed the full extent of the US intelligence services capabilities and activities in China. Analysis by the Washington think-tank link url=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/files.cnas.org/documents/CNASReport-Quantum-Tech_FINAL.pdf?mtime=20180912133406″%5DCentre for a New American Security[/link] says these revelations spooked the Chinese government into a search for new, home-grown cybersecurity solutions.

That’s why the bulk of China’s initial progress has been in the field of secure quantum communications – through projects such as Micius, as well as a ground-based quantum network in the northern province of Shandong. “In the field of quantum communications we are ahead of our colleagues over the world,” says Pan, who has said his work was given new impetus and urgency by Snowden’s disclosures.

The U.S-China race for quantum dominance

As the U.S. and China struggle for dominance in artificial intelligence, they are locked in a parallel, behind-the-scenes race to master quantum technology, a contest that could result in lasting military superiority and a possible new industrial revolution.

The big picture: Though still far off, conquering quantum technology could enable uncrackable communications, supercharged radar and more deadly undersea warfare. And as of now, China has some serious advantages.

A new report from the Center for a New American Security draws on open-source material for a window into China’s quantum progress and aspirations.
•The report’s authors, Elsa Kania and John Costello, say that China has made substantial advances in some areas of quantum research, putting it in a position to overtake the U.S. in the science.
•Chinese advantages include a national vision for technological research, significant investments, and tight bonds between the private sector and the military. By comparison, the U.S. yet to enact a quantum policy, though the White House recently added a quantum expert to its tech-policy staff.
•”China’s advances in quantum science could impact the future military and strategic balance, perhaps even leapfrogging traditional U.S. military–technological advantages,” write Kania and Costello.

How it works: Quantum technology capitalizes on the unusual properties of super-tiny particles to surpass what’s possible with normal, or “classical,” computing. Among its applications:
•Quantum cryptography, a leap over current techniques that would be nearly impossible to crack — and render modern encryption obsolete.
•Quantum computing, which promises to enormously accelerate computing, a breakthrough whose effects would be felt across the economy.

Quantum supremacy — the moment when quantum computers will be more capable than classical ones — is still well out of reach, but researchers in both countries are pushing aggressively in that direction.
•Kania and Costello argue that Chinese progress on quantum cryptography is world-class, demonstrated by the launch of the first-ever quantum satellite in 2016.
•While China lags on research into quantum computing, it’s quickly catching up.

Among the spoils of conquering the quantum space are computers that could decipher most of the world’s encrypted data, like the NSA’s store of intercepted communications, and overcome the U.S. stealth technologies on which the military heavily relies.

How they got here: China had a “Sputnik moment” in 2013, igniting a national plan that funnels billions of dollars and top scientists into quantum research, the authors write.
•Its unlikely instigator was Edward Snowden, whose leaks revealed the extent of U.S. spying in China, and sparked a feverish response meant to shore up China’s protections against cyber-espionage.
•This inflection point mirrors another three years later: An Obama Administration report outlining a future U.S. artificial intelligence policy. Afterward, Beijing scrambled to put together its own, far outstripping American planning, while the Trump administration has neither engaged Obama’s policy nor formulated its own.

China may have developed a quantum radar that can spot stealth planes

A company claims to have created a quantum radar that can detect stealth aircraft and see through the radar jamming used to hide warplanes.

Defence giant China Electronics Technology Group Corporation displayed the prototype at the Zhuhai air show last week.

Stealth aircraft avoid detection by redirecting most of a radar system’s radio waves, which usually reflect off their surface and reveal their location.

China’s quantum development plan is aggressive, and Donald Trump wants one just like it

After breakthroughs by Chinese scientists over the past decade, Washington issues commitment to ‘maintaining American leadership in quantum information science’ (sssshhhh! This is funny! :D)

They say imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. And after observing China’s state-led push to become a world leader in the field of quantum technology, it seems the United States is about to pay Beijing a considerable compliment and follow suit.

For about a decade China has been committed to increasing its capabilities in the field. In that time it has funded major projects, brought scientists from across the country to work together and encouraged students to enter the field.

While this high level of government involvement has led to a number of breakthroughs for China, it also stands in stark contrast to the low-key approach adopted by the US in the period.

But according to a document released by Washington earlier this week, that could all be about to change.
(he he he he! sssshhh!)

China’s Quest To Become A Quantum Superpower

China’s Quantum Future

Xi’s Quest to Build a High-Tech Superpower
By Elsa B. Kania

China should be a “global leader in innovation” by 2035, President Xi Jinping declared during the Chinese Communist Party’s 19th National Congress last October. His remarks reflected a core strategic ambition: After decades of reliance upon foreign technology, Xi’s China aspires not only to catch up with the West’s technological development but to surpass it—through a national strategy for “innovation-driven” development.

China’s trajectory in quantum science—which leverages principles of quantum mechanics to create disruptive, perhaps transformative technologies—will be a key test of Xi’s ambitions. Beijing is striving to become a world leader in quantum technology through large-scale state-guided investments, which may total tens of billions of dollars in the years to come. Under its 13th five-year plan, introduced in 2016, China has launched a “megaproject” for quantum communications and computing, which aims to achieve major breakthroughs in these technologies by 2030, including the expansion of China’s national quantum communications infrastructure, the development of a general quantum computer prototype, and the construction of a practical quantum simulator. China is also building the National Laboratory for Quantum Information Sciences, which, with over $1 billion in initial funding, could emerge as a key center of gravity for future research and development.

Will China succeed in its plans to pioneer advances in quantum technology?
(probably not)

China is building a massive multi-location national-level quantum laboratory

During the 8th International Conference on Quantum Cryptography which took place in Shanghai last week, China announced to be in the progress of building a new multi-location quantum information lab, local media Yicai (in Chinese) reports.

According to the announcement, the new lab will integrate resources in different regions including Hefei in Anhui province, Shanghai, and Beijing. The lab’s branch in Hefei called the National Laboratory for Quantum Information Sciences started construction in 2017 and will cover a land area of 86 acres (362,667 square meters) by completion. It aims to accelerate quantum R&D and application with the help of University of Science and Technology of China also located in the area.

An insider from the university told Yicai that the program has received a funding of around RMB 1 billion from Anhui’s provincial government and Shanghai’s municipal government. The insider added that the state will invest over RMB 100 billion as a long-term supporter.

The Hefei lab received $10 billion from the local government in 2017, according to reports. The new RMB 1 billion is likely to be a bonus financing to upgrade existing infrastructure and enhance the connection between different branches.

In September 2017, China launched a quantum fiber link connecting four major cities: Beijing, Shanghai, Jinan, and Hefei. The link is also using China’s Micius, the world’s first quantum communication satellite. Partners of the link project include the State Grid Corporation of China, the country’s state-owned electricity utility company.

Additionally, Alibaba jointly established a Shanghai-based quantum computation lab with the Chinese Academy of Sciences. The company also participated in the International Conference on Quantum Cryptography this year.

Increasing quantum investment in Beijing, Shanghai, and Hefei area appears as a strengthening of resources and an aggressive move to accelerate the field’s development in order to stay ahead of a global game which is now led by China and the US.

On June 27 this year, the US passed the National Quantum Initiative Act (H. R. 6227), promising a 10-year federal effort to boost quantum science as well as a $1.3 billion budget to support the country’s quantum computation projects between 2019 and 2023. Prior to the Act, government investment in quantum research was around $200 million per year, according to the latest 2016 data—far behind China’s state-backed financing.

DON’T SAY NO-BODY WARNED YA CHINA!!!

Bollocks… I know who I’m answering to… The West Coast… no not the West Coast America!

cosmology, GUT-CP, Humour, hydrino, Philosophy, quantum physics, Randell Mills

The Philosophical Corruption of Physics Part II (“… NO-ONE EXPECTS THE MILLSIAN INQUISITION!”)

 

monty4

“All I said was ‘I don’t think Niels Bohr gave twentieth century physics a satisfactory explanation as to why the electron of a hydrogen atom cannot fall into a lower state of orbit’… I didn’t expect a sort of Spanish Inquisition.”
“NO-ONE EXPECTS THE MILLSIAN INQUISITION! Our three chief weapons are instant surprise trolling, slander, ridicule and an almost fanatical devotion to Quantum Mechanics… four chief weapons! Our four chief weapons are instant surprise trolling, slander, ridicule, an almost fanatical devotion to Quantum Mechanics and an unsatisfactory explanation as to why the hydrogen atom cannot fall into a lower state of orbit. FIVE CHIEF WEAPONS! Our five chief weapons are instant surprise trolling, slander, ridicule, an almost fanatical devotion to Quantum Mechanics, an unsatisfactory explanation as to why the hydrogen atom cannot fall into a lower state of orbit, and an almost unbelievably absurd interpretation of something that never really was a scientific experiment to begin with!… DAMN IT! Six chief weapons of attack… I’ll start again.”
“Erm? :/ … all I said was ‘I don’t think Niels Bohr ever gave twentieth century physics a satisfactory explanation as to why the electron of a hydrogen atom cannot fall into a lower state of orbit’… er… I didn’t expect a sort of Spanish Inquisition.”
“NO-ONE EXPECTS THE MILLSIAN INQUISITION! Our six chief weapons are… instant surprise trolling on any online scientific publication that mention Randell Mills, slander, ridicule, an almost fanatical devotion to Quantum Mechanics, an unsatisfactory explanation as to why the electron of a hydrogen atom cannot fall into a lower state of orbit, an unbelievably absurd interpretation of something that was never really a scientific experiment to begin with and… an over reliance on overly complicated mathematical formulae that can no longer be used to express the observations being made in physics or cosmology or even REALITY!… … DAMN IT!”

monty1

Some recent scientific publications in the field of cosmology… and some comments from ‘The Millsian Inquisition!’

Parker Solar Probe and the curious case of the hot corona (Phys.org)
nasasparkers

What is Dark Matter? Even the Best Theories Are Crumbling (Discover Magazine)

Bump on a plot from Chandra X-ray observatory reveals excess of X-rays, hinting at dark matter (Phys.org)
darkmatter

Anyhoo… if you haven’t listened to David Harrimans lecture ‘The Philosophical Corruption of Physics’, I highly recommend. It is exceptionally insightful and enlightening, detailing how the mistakes of 20th century Quantum Mechanics can be traced back to the philosophies of Immanuel Kant, the 18th century modern philosopher who completely rejected Newtonian physics… which in turn led to the German Romanticists… which in turn led to the German Physicists of late 19th century/early 20th century (Mach, Heisenberg, Schrodinger, Bohr) rejecting laws of identity and causality… essentially rejecting observation… relying upon the results being interpreted from pre-constructed mathematical formulae (instead of mathematical formulas being constructed from the results!)… … in short Quantum Physics derived from the culture of German ‘nihilism’… the same culture that gave rise to Heideggers Existentialism and Nazi Germany (and also Freudian psychology!)…

and in the 21st century, Quantum Physics is regarded as ‘the most successful scientific theory ever developed’ … apparently! :/

monty2

Philosophy, physics, quantum physics

The Quantum Physics Fairy Tale (Tales from Immanuel Kant)

“Quantum Physics is a fairy tale! Like a pretty, perfect looking magical castle in the distance… but when you finally get up close and inside… it’s a dark deceptive trap that you can never escape from!… … And it’s about to collapse!”

From David Harriman’s course “The Philosophic Corruption of Physics,”…

Below is a series of lectures, David Harriman’s series, “The Philosophic Corruption of Physics/Reality.” Herein, he walks us through the history of physics and how the Kantian philosophy subverted the science.

“I love the way this guy pronounces ‘Kant’… it’s like the posh English way of pronouncing…
“Okey dokey Danny Boy!”
“Quite fitting though really!” 😀