Child Pornography, Online Child Abuse, technology

22% of men aged 18-24 do not agree that children in child sexual abuse images are harmed by the experience?… 11% do not think it is illegal to download, view or share indecent images of a child when they are under 16?… 98% of victims are 13 or under

“WHAT THE HOLY FLYING FUCK!!!”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LNbplPO7BPg

“DID you know that 22% of men aged 18-24 do not agree that children in child sexual abuse images are harmed by the experience? Or that 11% do not think it is illegal to download, view or share indecent images of a child when they are under 16?”

IWF: Helping young men to navigate the internet safely

DID you know that 22% of men aged 18-24 do not agree that children in child sexual abuse images are harmed by the experience? Or that 11% do not think it is illegal to download, view or share indecent images of a child when they are under 16?

These research findings demonstrate the need for an initiative that aims to educate young men on the law relating to sexual images and videos of under-18s online. Jointly led by the IWF (Internet Watch Foundation), The Marie Collins Foundation (MCF) and the government, the campaign encourages young men to know the law when viewing sexual images online and take a ‘no ifs no buts’ approach if they see something concerning, by reporting it to the IWF.

Why does this matter? The victim’s perspective

In 2017, our team of expert Analysts processed 132,636 reports. One report could contain one or thousands of images and videos, and half of the reports came from the public. The children depicted in these horrific pictures and videos are real. Reporting content can lead to the rescue of victims from horrendous situations and prevent victims of child sexual abuse from ongoing harm, caused by knowing images of their abuse are being watched by potentially thousands of people again and again.

The campaign consists of a range of films which aim to help young men navigate the internet safely and reinforce the message that viewing, sharing and distributing sexual images of anyone under the age of 18 is against the law, even if you didn’t know how old the person in the image or video is.
3.-November-Young-men-campaign-Stephanies-story-caption-e1542191579767.png

The social media and entertainment publisher LADBible has also created materials that show why knowing the law and reporting is so crucial. The film Stephanie’s Story shows what a victim has to go through knowing that images of their abuse can be accessed online: “Just knowing that someone could be looking at a video of me online at any time makes me feel sick and I feel used all over again. I feel angry towards the guys looking, to me they’re abusers just like Chris and may as well have been in the room at the time.”
How one report can save a child from a life of abuse

As the UK Hotline working to remove child sexual abuse images and videos online, we also want to help young men navigate the internet more responsibly. Stumbling across indecent images of children online is easier than you think. Watch this video to test your own assumptions. How easy do you think it is to tell the age of a person you’ve only seen on an image or video?

Remember, if you encounter sexual images of children online, you can anonymously report them to the IWF. Reporting only takes a few minutes. One report is all it can take to save a child from a life of abuse. In the words of one of our Analysts: “All it needs is one report. The young lad that reported it to us probably doesn’t even realise what he’s done and how he’s helped that child. I don’t think he has any idea the good he’s done.” This short film created in partnership with LADbible tells the story of how one single report helped save a girl from further abuse.

Want to know more?

A supporter pack is available for download here, which includes a range of content, links to campaign videos and suggestions of ways that your organisation can get involved with this initiative.

Know the law. NO IFS, NO BUTS. Do the right thing and help us eliminate indecent images of children online. Report at iwf.org.uk.

IWF research on child sex abuse live-streaming reveals 98% of victims are 13 or under

The charity calls for greater awareness as youngest victim identified is just three-years-old

A new study by the Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) has revealed shocking statistics on children being groomed, coerced and blackmailed into live-streaming their own sexual abuse over webcams, tablets and mobile phones.

The research, Online Child Sexual Exploitation: Examining the Distribution of Captures of Live-streamed Child Sexual Abuse(PDF 719KB) was conducted over a three-month period and identified 2,082 images and videos of live-streamed child sexual abuse. It revealed that 98% of images found were of children aged 13 and under, 28% were aged 10 or under, while the youngest victim was just three-years-old.
Top lines from the study found:

96% of victims were girls.

96% showed a child on their own, in a home environment.

18% of the abuse was categorised as Category A, which includes the rape and sexual torture of children.

40% of the abuse was categorised as Category A or B, which indicates serious sexual abuse.

100% of images had been harvested from their original upload locations.

Shockingly, 100% of the imagery had been harvested from the original upload location and had been redistributed on third party websites, with 73% of content appearing on 16 dedicated forums. This indicates the abusive imagery was being shared with the intention of advertising paid downloads of videos of webcam child sexual abuse.
Sadly, a huge 40% of this illegal imagery was confirmed as Category A or B, 18% being Category A which involves what IWF classifies as the rape and sexual torture of children. The remainder was classed as Category C.

Of the live-streamed content, 4% was captured from mobile-only streaming apps.
The Internet Watch Foundation, which conducted the research (over a three-month period from August to October 2017) with funding support from Microsoft, is calling for greater awareness of online child sexual abuse using live-streaming apps. The organisation wants to encourage parents, carers and professionals working with youngsters to be aware of children’s technology use and the dangers posed to them by offenders.

Susie Hargreaves OBE, IWF CEO, said: “We know that these figures will be shocking to read. This is a trend we identified from our Hotline data and were deeply concerned about. Microsoft provided the funding, so that we could take an in-depth look at these illegal live-streamed videos.

“The report worked with over 2,000 cases where children had been, we believe, either groomed or coerced into live-streaming video of themselves, via their webcam, mobile or tablet. The backgrounds in the videos we studied, mostly showed that the youngsters were in very ordinary ‘home’ settings – somewhere like their bedrooms, or a bathroom. Critically, no adult appeared to be present in the images we saw. Therefore, it’s our belief that these children were being ‘directed’ to abuse themselves and live-stream the sexual abuse.

“This form of grooming is complicated and only possible because of the ‘anonymity’ the internet offers. An offender may be, for example, a 40-year-old man. But by abusing a legitimate internet site to create a false profile, he could appear online as a 12-year-old school girl. Sadly, through this study we saw a range of grooming scenarios that abusers employ.

“We know that this information will be terrifying for most parents. That’s why we are trying to warn parents, carers and professionals working with children, about the potential abuse of live steaming technology by offenders.”

The study suggests that any legitimate internet platform could be abused by offenders intent on contacting children. This makes any platform offering live-streaming a potential target for offenders. Because of this, the IWF is warning parents that this can happen to any child who has access to live-streaming technology. All parents and carers need to be vigilant and know the technology your children are using.

In the last six months, IWF data has found that a little over a third (38%) of reports to the organisation on child sexual abuse online were now what we term ‘self-produced’. This term refers to a scenario where the child is alone, or with other children and is persuaded or ‘groomed’ into taking images or videos of child sexual abuse and then share them, often with someone they trust. The IWF is now warning the public about the danger of allowing children unrestricted and unsupervised access to webcams and mobile phone cameras, as a serious threat to children.

Sarah Smith, IWF Technical Projects Officer and author of the paper, said: “The majority of children we saw in this study were aged between seven to 13. But the youngest was assessed as just three. Thankfully, the study identified very few children within this age range. However, it is important to be aware that even very young children can be abused or groomed in this way.

“Most of the illegal videos we saw had apparently been recorded by offenders, who viewed the live-streamed abuse and then distributed it. The children in these disturbing videos appear to be completely unaware a recording was being made. They are clearly being abused, even if the offender isn’t in the room. This level of grooming is sophisticated.

“For us, it wasn’t a surprise to see that 100% of the illegal content we analysed had apparently been taken from its original upload location and redistributed. We often see the same images of child sexual abuse uploaded again and again, as offenders share the content with other offenders. The revictimisation of these children is ongoing and it’s incredibly sad to see. These are real children.

“This new research shows a worrying new trend in the abuse of children. Permanent captures from live-streams showing children being groomed or encouraged to perform sexual acts, now represent most of the new images and videos IWF sees. Our recent data shows that so-called ‘self-produced’ content accounts for more than one in three of reports that are made to the IWF. This is an alarming figure and one which the IWF feels merits further awareness raising and research.”

“IWF believes any legitimate internet platform could be abused by offenders intent on contacting children. This makes any platform offering live-streaming a potential target. This abuse can happen to any child who has access to live-streaming technology. The report points to the need for greater awareness amongst educators, professionals and carers. All parents and carers should remain vigilant.”

The work was funded by Microsoft. Jacqueline Beauchere, Chief Online Safety Officer at Microsoft, said: “For more than two decades, Microsoft has been working to fight online child sexual exploitation with technology, partnerships and educational efforts. New research and data like this Internet Watch Foundation study, developed with funding support from Microsoft, play a key role in furthering our efforts to prevent such atrocities and to improve online child protection worldwide.”
Read the report here.

Child Pornography, Online Child Abuse, technology

Police to trial new tools on Child Image Abuse Database

“It’s in the police, the armed forces, the Church (obviously), the British intelligence services … the UK is drowning in it (as well as Nazism, stalking, knife crime)…
the UK is a failed society!

Police to trial new tools on Child Image Abuse Database

The Home Office has revealed details of work to develop new tools to improve the capabilities of the Child Abuse Image Database (CAID).

Home Secretary Sajid Javid (pictured) has announced the move as one of a series of measures aimed at cracking down on online child exploitation and grooming.
The work involves the development of three new tools using CAID, the database used by the National Crime Agency (NCA) and UK police forces to search for indecent images of children and increase the ability to identify victims.
They include a fast-forensic algorithm to rapidly analyse seized devices and categorise against CAID and a capability to automatically identify and categorise illegal imagery based on UK legislation of classification of A, B, C against the CAID trusted images.
The third is capability to detect images with matching scenes to help identify locations in common of indecent images of children.
Some police forces will begin to run trials with the tools later this year.
Warning prototype
The Home Office has also supported the development of a prototype tool to automatically flag potential conversations between child groomers and children.
It emerged from a two-day hackathon in the US involving engineers from some of the world’s largest technology companies, including Facebook, Google, Snap and Twitter, co-hosted by the Home Office and Microsoft.
Javid said: “We all have a responsibility to tackle online child sexual exploitation and the new tool developed during the hackathon is a positive step forward.
“Once complete, it will be rolled out for free to other tech companies that want to deploy it.”
In addition, an innovation call has now opened for organisations to bid for shares of £250,000 to assist them in developing innovative solutions to disrupt live streaming of abuse.
Through the competition, led by the Joint Security and Resilience Centre in partnership with Innovate UK, groups are being urged to come up with technical solutions that could be applied by platforms of all sizes, including those with less resource to commit to research.

Child Pornography, Online Child Abuse

‘New tool developed to tackle online child grooming’… FINALLY! (Microsoft, Google, Facebook, Twitter… I’ve never heard of Snap?)

“I asked an eight girl, whom I met online, how she thought she should kept safe from online predators.” 😀
Seriously though, I asked one my best friends daughters what her ideas where, in regards to ‘being safe’ whilst on the internet (I talk to kids about this stuff), and she said… “IT SHOULD BE TAUGHT IN SCHOOLS!” (Wow! She should be Home Secretary!)
When asked to elaborate, her ideas where a police officer or ‘someone qualified’ should come into class once a year, or even once a term, from the ages of five/six, and talk to them about ‘bad people’ on the internet, ‘bad videos’ on the internet, and anything that makes them scared or uncomfortable whilst online… and what to do and who to speak to in such situations.

Like I said, should be Home Secretary.

man

New tool developed to tackle online child grooming

Home Secretary Sajid Javid has hailed a new anti-grooming tool as an important weapon in the fight against online child sexual exploitation.

Engineers from some of the world’s biggest tech firms, including Microsoft, Facebook, Google, Snap and Twitter, worked for 2 days at a hackathon in the United States co-hosted by the Home Secretary and Microsoft, which tasked industry experts to come up with tools to identify online child grooming.

A prototype tool has been developed that can be used to automatically flag potential conversations taking place between child groomers and children.

Home Secretary Sajid Javid said:
“We all have a responsibility to tackle online child sexual exploitation and the new tool developed during the hackathon is a positive step forward.”

“Once complete, it will be rolled out for free to other tech companies that want to deploy it.”

“This is just one thing we can do together to combat this appalling crime.”

Hackathon participants analysed tens of thousands of conversations to understand patterns used by predators. This enabled engineers to develop technology to automatically and accurately detect these patterns.

Potential conversations between a groomer and their victim will be flagged so a moderator can investigate further.

Further work will take place on the prototype. Once completed it will be licensed free of charge to smaller and medium-sized technology companies worldwide.

During his trip to the United States the Home Secretary met major tech firms so he can be updated on their efforts to tackle the crime. He used the meetings to explore how companies could make greater use of technology to proactively find and remove abusive content from their sites.

He noted that, while some progress had been made, companies still had to go further and work faster to tackle online child sexual exploitation (CSE). The Home Secretary was thanked for his leadership and commitment to the issue of CSE.

Online child sexual abuse will be the focus of the next Five Country Ministerial meeting in London in summer 2019, bringing together interior ministers and attorneys general from the UK, US, Australia, Canada and New Zealand. (‘THE FIVE EYES!’)

Last week the government announced a package of measures to tackle online CSE. This included:

– commissioning the Internet Watch Foundation to investigate how advertising is funding CSE activity

– a taskforce, chaired by the Home Secretary, bringing together representatives from ad agencies, trade bodies and brands to ensure criminals don’t have access to this funding stream

– a £250,000 innovation call for organisations to bid for funding to assist them in developing innovative solutions to disrupt live streaming of abuse

– new tools to improve the capabilities of the Child Abuse Image Database (CAID) – the database used by the NCA and UK police forces to search for indecent images of children and increase the ability to identify victims

Home Secretary welcomes new anti-grooming tool

Sajid Javid co-hosted a ‘hackathon’ event in the US last week.

Experts have devised an anti-grooming tool in a boost for Home Secretary Sajid Javid’s drive to combat online child abuse.

Engineers from some of the world’s biggest tech firms, including Microsoft, Facebook, Google, Snap and Twitter, worked for two days at a “hackathon” in the US last week.
Participants at the event, co-hosted by Microsoft and the Home Secretary, analysed tens of thousands of conversations to understand patterns used by predators.

The exercise yielded a prototype tool that can be used to automatically flag potential conversations taking place between groomers and children.

Once these exchanges are flagged, they can be investigated by a moderator.

Further work will take place on the prototype. Once completed it will be licensed free of charge to smaller and medium-sized technology companies worldwide.

Mr Javid said: “We all have a responsibility to tackle online child sexual exploitation and the new tool developed during the hackathon is a positive step forward.

“Once complete, it will be rolled out for free to other tech companies that want to deploy it.

“This is just one thing we can do together to combat this appalling crime.”

The Home Secretary held talks with major tech firms about their efforts to tackle child sexual exploitation and remove abusive content from their sites.

Earlier this year he described his shock at discovering the scale of the danger posed by paedophiles on the internet.

In a speech in September he disclosed that the National Crime Agency estimated that around 80,000 people in the UK presented some kind of sexual threat to children online.
Referrals of child abuse images to the NCA have surged by 700% in the last five years, while separate figures suggest police in England and Wales record an average 25 child sexual offences involving the internet every day.

Child Pornography, Crime, Online Child Abuse, technology

New government action announced to tackle online child sexual abuse (FINALLY!)

“Yeah, yeah… I’ll return to physics and GUT-CP in a short while… trying to get something done about this is a slight distraction, but considering the whole of the UK just buried their head in the sand (in fact, actively fought against having anything done about it)… … so now the UK Government has finally joined the fight against online child abuse! Seem to be doing something… perhaps they can also do something about the epidemic rise in stalking as well? (just Google ‘stalking UK news‘ for an idea on how big that crime is)

“Following a call to industry 3 new tools using CAID are being developed
– a fast-forensic algorithm to rapidly analyse seized devices and categorise against CAID
– a capability to automatically identify and categorise illegal imagery based on UK legislation of classification of A, B, C against the CAID trusted images
– a capability to detect images with matching scenes to help identify locations in common of indecent images of children.”

What some of us are interested in, is the use of AI technology and algorithms to detect and remove child abuse images, to detect child grooming & live streaming of abuse, using AI to actually trace and identify the perpetrators… we would ask GCHQ for help, but they’re probably too busy stalking people and watching child porn.

‘Dark web’: GCHQ and National Crime Agency join forces in hunt for child abuse
(2014… and since that time there has been a 700% increase in online child abuse)

man

New government action announced to tackle online child sexual abuse
(some researchers from Lancaster University have some good ideas)

The Home Secretary announces action ahead of meeting with tech giants in the US to discuss their progress in tackling child sexual exploitation.

Home Secretary Sajid Javid will travel to Silicon Valley this week to assess the progress tech giants are making in eradicating online child sexual exploitation (CSE).

During a series of meetings with some of the world’s biggest technology companies, the Home Secretary will be updated on what has been done to tackle this abhorrent crime and urge companies to do all they can to respond to the evolving threat.

As part of the visit the Home Secretary will also be travelling to Microsoft’s HQ in Redmond to convene a ‘hackathon’, which will see industry experts work together to come up with tools to detect online child grooming.

The Home Secretary has made it his mission to tackle online CSE, which includes looking at all aspects of this crime. In September, he set out a commitment to drive an improved response to the horrifying scale of child sexual abuse online in a speech to the NSPCC.

Today the Home Secretary announced that he has commissioned the Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) to look at how advertising is funding CSE activity.

Advertisements for legitimate products, including from well-known brands, are appearing on sites hosting child abuse. The work by the Internet Watch Foundation will help outline the scale of the problem and how government and industry should respond.

The Home Secretary will also chair a new taskforce to bring together representatives from advertising agencies, trade bodies and brands to discuss next steps to ensure criminals don’t have access to this funding stream.

Home Secretary Sajid Javid said:

Keeping our children safe is my mission as Home Secretary and it is vital tech companies take their responsibility seriously.

I have demanded action and will be discussing the progress industry has made during my visit to the US – as well as seeing the latest tools being developed to detect online child grooming.

This government is leading the response against these sickening crimes. Today, I’ve commissioned new research to look at how advertising is fuelling the sexual exploitation of children online and I am providing further funding for schemes to tackle the live-streaming of abuse.

Commenting on the commission, Susie Hargreaves OBE, CEO of the Internet Watch Foundation said:

We are delighted that the Home Office has asked us to provide data to explore how legitimate advertisers are being exploited by offenders, intent on sharing horrific imagery of child sexual abuse online. Using a variety of sophisticated techniques to avoid detection, offenders are exploiting online advertising networks to monetise their distribution of child sexual abuse material.

At the heart of all our work, are the child victims of this hideous crime. They range from babies to teens. The abuse itself is horrific, but by sharing the images and videos of these crimes against innocent children, offenders are forcing the victims to suffer the torment of knowing their abuse continues.

It is our mission to identify the methods offenders are employing to share this disturbing material, enabling us to most effectively disrupt its distribution. We hope this research will help us in this battle.

On Wednesday the Home Secretary will give a speech at Microsoft’s headquarters before the tech hack takes place on the same day. This will see engineers come together to try and come up with solutions for tackling online grooming. Any products will then be given out as a free tool for others to use.

The National Crime Agency estimates that around 80,000 people in the UK present some kind of sexual threat to children online while there has been a 700% increase since 2013 in the number of referrals to the National Crime Agency for child sexual abuse images.
In a further attempt to improve the response, work is being done to develop new tools to improve the capabilities of the Child Abuse Image Database (CAID) – the database used by the NCA and UK police forces to search for indecent images of children and increase the ability to identify victims.

Following a call to industry 3 new tools using CAID are being developed:

– a fast-forensic algorithm to rapidly analyse seized devices and categorise against CAID
– a capability to automatically identify and categorise illegal imagery based on UK legislation of classification of A, B, C against the CAID trusted images
– a capability to detect images with matching scenes to help identify locations in common of indecent images of children

Trials to test this newly developed capability with some police forces will begin later this year. Further to this, a £250,000 innovation call has now opened for organisations to bid for funding to assist them in developing innovative solutions to disrupt live streaming of abuse.

Through the competition, led by the Joint Security and Resilience Centre in partnership with Innovate UK, groups are being urged to come up with technical solutions that could be applied by platforms of all sizes, including those with less resource to commit to research.

Child Pornography, Crime, Online Child Abuse

“Everyone probably knows a paedophile”, Britain’s top police officer claims (Internet Watch Foundation, NCA, Home Office)

“Wow! What a genius! The UKs top police officer Cressida Dick has come up with a brand new slogan for the Official British Tourism Board ‘Visit Britain’

“Monarchy. Empire. Weather. Queuing. Miserableness. Football. Knife crime. Drunkenness… Visit Britain… Where everybody knows a paedophile! … … probably”

UK-Police
Visit Britain… where everybody knows a paedophile… probably.”

It is everywhere! Judicial system, police, armed forces, healthcare, education system… at EVERY level of society, in every profession, all races, religions and creeds… it is a national epidemic!

THE GREATEST PIECE OF COMEDY EVER WRITTEN!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldFaroSsmKQ&t=246s

Everyone probably knows a paedophile, Britain’s top police officer claims

comp

The viewing of indecent images of children is so prevalent that people probably know someone within their circle who does it, Cressida Dick, the Metropolitan Police Commissioner said today.

She told the BBC that viewing of such images had “grown hugely”, with official figures showing a 700% rise in the number referred to police by social media companies since 2012.

“People think that is horrendous, it is, but I’m afraid we probably all know somebody who does that,” she told the BBC.

“So we must think more about the people who are making the images, live streaming and that kind of thing.”

Ms Dick cited the growth of child abuse as another pressure on police resources amid the growing debate over force priorities.

Earlier this week, Sara Thornton, head of the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC), said she wanted police to focus on tackling violent crime and burglaries rather than being distracted by expanding hate crimes to include misogyny.

She was backed by Ms Dick, who said she wanted her officers to focus on violent crime, rather than hate crime.

It is estimated that at least 80,000 people in the UK pose a sexual threat to children online.

Cressida Dick talks at a London Assembly meeting on November 1, 2018 Credit: Ray Lang/LNP
Police in England and Wales recorded around 23 child sexual offences involving the internet every day in 2017/18 – up from a rate of around 15 a day in the previous 12 months.

Next week Sajid Javid, the Home Secretary, is to meet social media firms in America to find out how they plan to meet his demands for swifter and more effective action against online child abuse and indecent images.
In September he warned them that would “not be afraid to take action” if they do not help to tackle child sexual abuse online.
Javid said he was “demanding” companies take “more measures” particularly in preventing the uploading of images to their platforms and reducing the number of images – or face new legislation.

Javid launches study into advertising on child abuse sites

Home secretary asks charity to investigate scale of problem and make recommendations

Advertising is fuelling the sexual exploitation of children online, the home secretary has said, as he commissioned research into the issue.

Before setting off on a trip to the US west coast to meet tech leaders, Sajid Javid announced that a charity would look at how digital advertising may fund exploitation.
Advertisements for legitimate products, including from well-known brands, can appear on sites hosting child abuse, the Home Office said.

The Internet Watch Foundation, a charity that works to remove online child sexual abuse content, has been asked to investigate the scale of the problem and make recommendations on how the government and industry should respond.

Susie Hargreaves, the foundation’s chief executive, said: “Using a variety of sophisticated techniques to avoid detection, offenders are exploiting online advertising networks to monetise their distribution of child sexual abuse material.

“At the heart of all our work are the child victims of this hideous crime. They range from babies to teens. The abuse itself is horrific but by sharing the images and videos of these crimes against innocent children, offenders are forcing the victims to suffer the torment of knowing their abuse continues.”

Javid will chair a taskforce to bring together representatives from ad agencies, trade bodies and brands to discuss steps that could be taken to cut criminals off from this revenue stream.

The home secretary has previously accused tech firms of not doing enough to tackle the issue of child sexual exploitation. This week he will travel to the Microsoft HQ in Redmond, Washington, to convene a “hackathon” where industry experts will work together to develop tools to detect online child grooming.

Javid said: “Keeping our children safe is my mission as home secretary and it is vital tech companies take their responsibility seriously. I have demanded action and will be discussing the progress industry has made during my visit to the US, as well as seeing the latest tools being developed to detect online child grooming.”

The National Crime Agency estimates that around 80,000 people in the UK present some kind of sexual threat to children online. Since 2013 there has been a 700% increase in the number of referrals to the NCA for child sexual abuse images.

Work is being done to develop new tools to improve the capabilities of the child abuse image database (CAID), which is used by the NCA and UK police forces to record indecent images of children and increase the ability to identify victims. Trials to test newly developed capabilities within the database will begin in some police forces later this year.

The Home Office also announced that organisations could bid for up to £250,000 of funding to develop ways of disrupting live-streaming of abuse.

Through the competition, led by the Joint Security and Resilience Centre in partnership with Innovate UK, groups are being urged to come up with technical solutions that could be applied by platforms of all sizes.

#UKCharityWeek partner praised as a global leader in the fight against child sexual abuse imagery

stop

A unique British charity which hunts down and removes online child sexual abuse images and videos has won praise for outstanding good practice.

The praise came from a top EU assessor for its global work with law enforcement and the internet industry to remove tens of thousands of horrific images each year.

The Internet Watch Foundation (IWF), an Official Partner Charity of Charity Today‘s #UKCharityWeek campaign, was assessed during a two-day visit to its Cambridge base.

The appraisal by INHOPE, a global collaboration of hotlines working against online child abuse, reviewed the charity’s relationship with government, law enforcement and child welfare agencies, together with care for staff, internet security and data management.

The INHOPE report says: “The IWF maintains exceptional standards in all areas and its practices can be recommended to new or existing hotlines wishing to develop or expand their services”.

“Not only does the IWF operate to an exceptionally high standard in the UK, but its operations and structure in many ways set the standard for other hotlines around the world. It was particularly impressive to gain insight into the adaptability and ongoing evolution of operational procedures at the IWF.”

Susie Hargreaves OBE, IWF CEO said:
“At the IWF, we’re constantly learning through experience and partnerships. When we began in 1996, 18 per cent of the world’s online child sexual abuse material was hosted in the UK. Today I’m happy to say that the figure is less than one per cent.

“But the internet has no borders and nor has crime. Wherever they are in the world, we owe it to child victims of online abuse to do this job right. Our team of analysts in the Hotline works hard to locate, disrupt and remove images and videos as quickly as possible, always aware that these pictures show real children and their suffering is real. With help from key partners like the Government, global law enforcement, some of the biggest names in the internet business and of course the public, who report suspecting sites to us, we are in a unique position to take the lead in fighting this abuse.”

One of the first to congratulate the IWF on its star rating was the Home Office minister, who recently visited the IWF’s operation.

Minister for Crime, Safeguarding and Vulnerability Victoria Atkins said:
“I have seen first-hand the hugely important work that the Internet Watch Foundation carries out to remove these horrific images from the Internet.

“They are an important partner for the Government in tackling online child sexual abuse and I am pleased others recognise its vital contribution.”

The IWF has a unique role in proactively identifying and removing illegal child sexual abuse imagery online. It works in partnership to disrupt offenders who use the online environment to distribute and share these disturbing images and videos.