Anti-gravity, artificial intelligence, astro-physics, Chemistry, cosmology, Dark Matter, DNA, energy, Environment, Genetics, GUT-CP, hydrides, hydrino, HydrinoEconomy, Millsian, Molecular modelling, New elements, particle physics, Randell Mills, SunCell, technology

Science On Tap… … TEL AVIV! ;D

“I’m thinking maybe Tel Aviv? The Weizmann Institute of Science?… some other people. Does Tel Aviv not host an annual piss up, with science lectures in bars?”
Science On Tap
“That’s the one!… yeah… in May? I was going to attend an Ayahuasca conference in Spain, but I’m going to go and check Israel out instead… go and do Tel Aviv and Haifa… see if I can fit in some Krav Maga training whilst I’m there” ;D~

Does anyone from the UK have a problem with me visiting Israel? Oh wait…
…………………./´¯/)
………………..,/¯../
………………./…./
…………./´¯/’…’/´¯¯`·¸
………./’/…/…./……./¨¯\
……..(‘(…´…´…. ¯~/’…’)
………\……………..’…../
……….”…\………. _.·´
…………\…………..(
…………..\………….\…

tel1.png

Science on Tap 2017
An influential initiative, creating a new urban culture that has been adopted around the globe – presented by Yivsam Azgad, Spokesman and Curator of the Weizmann Institute of Science, ISRAEL.
What is it? About 60 leading scientists and outstanding PhD students appear – on the same day, same hour – in bars and cafes around the city for informal talks with the patrons on the open scientific questions in their fields, on the sense of discovery, and on life on the “frontier” of science.
Are there parallel realities? Do dark energy and dark matter rule the Universe? How did life originate? Can we build a brain? Is nuclear fusion the solution to our energy problems? What do we mean by “personalized medicine?” Why do stars explode? Are we truly made of stardust? These are just a few of the questions that the scientists discuss.
tel

Science on Tap 2018
Dozens of top scientists and outstanding research students from the Weizmann Institute of Science will be in 51 bars in Tel Aviv to talk with the patrons.
tel2

In Tel Aviv, Quantum Physics Is Taught Over a Glass of Beer
Scientists raid Tel Aviv bars for one night a year, as part of the successful tradition called ‘Science on Tap.’
tel3

Weizmann Institute Of Science
WIZ11.jpg

HERE’S SOMETHING INTERESTING FROM WEIZMANN INSTITUTE!…

Plants rule
Prof. Ron Milo’s lab reveals stunning insights about Earth’s biomass
While humans make up just a tiny fraction—only 0.01 percent—of the mass of all living things, we are responsible for a hefty amount of destruction across other species.
Human activity has caused a decline in the total biomass of wild mammals—both marine and terrestrial— by a factor of six, or over 80 percent, since the dawn of civilization, according to a new Weizmann Institute-led study. Meanwhile, the total plant biomass has declined twofold since the emergence of people on the planet due to the cutting down of forests.
But the surprising finding was that plants still rule the Earth—comprising about 450 gigatons of carbon (Ct C) out of the total 550 Gt C of biomass on Earth. In comparison, humans make up a staggeringly low 0.06 Gt C, despite our enormous impact.
The study, recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, includes a census of the total biomass distributed among all kingdoms of life. Performed by PhD student Yinon Bar-On from Prof. Ron Milo’s laboratory in the Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, in collaboration with Caltech Prof. Ron Phillips, the research provides a holistic view of the biosphere’s composition while characterizing patterns according to taxonomic categories, geography, and nutrition. To assemble the census, the scientists conducted extensive analyses based on hundreds of existing studies.
Another insight from the study was that while the biomass of wild animals has declined steeply, the total mass of mammals—including humans and livestock—increased fourfold.
“Over the relatively short span of human history, major innovations, such as the domestication of livestock, the adoption of an agricultural lifestyle, and the Industrial Revolution, have increased the human population dramatically and have had radical ecological effects,” the authors observe. “The impact of human civilization on global biomass has not been limited to mammals but has also profoundly reshaped the total quantity of carbon sequestered by plants.”

Yeah anyway… Tel Aviv!
Tel_Aviv-Yafo_Marina

Tel Aviv Among World’s ‘Heavyweight’ Tech Hubs, Says New Report
While Silicon Valley is still “off the charts” as a global tech hub, Beijing and Shanghai are catching up and Tel Aviv is among the most influential and most international, with more deals involving foreign investors, according to a new report this week by New York-based research firm CB Insights.

Silicon Wadi
Silicon Wadi[1] (Hebrew: סיליקון ואדי‎, lit: “Silicon Valley”) is an area with a high concentration of high-technology companies on the coastal plain of Israel, similar to Silicon Valley in the U.S. state of California, and is the reason Israel is nicknamed the Start-Up Nation.[2][3] The area covers much of the country, although especially high concentrations of high-tech industry can be found in the area around Tel Aviv, including small clusters around the cities of Ra’anana, Petah Tikva, Herzliya, Netanya, the academic city of Rehovot and its neighbour Rishon Le Zion. In addition, high-tech clusters can be found in Haifa and Caesarea. More recent high-tech establishments have been raised in Jerusalem, and in towns such as Yokneam Illit and Israel’s first “private city,” Airport City, near Tel Aviv.
israel60_medium

Tel Aviv Startup City
Ranked one of the world’s leading innovative cities, Tel Aviv is at the heart of the global startup scene. Through its vast resources, top talent, highest level of venture capital per capita, and non-stop culture, Tel Aviv is the place to be to create the next big project. Tel Aviv welcomes all ideas and startups no matter the size and will support you in your journey. The city, with its fast-paced nightlife and unforgettable environment, breeds the best innovation, uniqueness, and creativity.
TelAviv_1920x1080.jpg

The Rise Of Tel Aviv’s Tech Hub
Tel Aviv has long been the epicentre of Israel’s bustling high tech scene. The latest trend overtaking the startup world is shared workplaces dedicated for techies and young professionals alike to work in, and Tel Aviv’s famously (un)corporate work culture is leading the way. Built around open spaces and geared towards networking, these hubs range from so-called “accelerators” run by investors, to small communal offices for freelancers and creatives. In Tel Aviv, you can find a wide variety of both, with big firms like Microsoft setting up shop alongside hip young workspaces, perfect for the gig economy.

Tel Aviv Tech Hub May Be Small, But It Leads with Large Exits, Report Says
A new report by research firm CB Insights says that among the world’s six heavyweight tech hubs, Tel Aviv has the lowest number, highest quality of deals.

10 disruptive Israeli companies that can wean the world off fossil fuels
Solar, water, geothermal and wind power, battery techs and electric-car components are areas where Israelis are leading the renewable revolution.

Energetics Technology Ltd.
energetics

ארה”ב רוצה לפתח לייזרים עם ישראל. והיא מקצה לזה 25
מליוני דולרים

Chemistry, Dark Matter, Futurism, GUT-CP, hydrino, particle physics, Philosophy, physics, Randell Mills, SunCell, technology

Randall Mills and the great “disruptive innovation.”

“The Russians will soon make LENR (or ‘Cold Nuclear Transmutation’ as it is known in Russia) an officially publicly recognised science… … and a number of their scientists have already recognised Mills for the genius he is, and the implications GUT-CP will have for our species (PhilosophyStorm.org/Koroeada)… three questions to the Kremlin:-
1) Do you know what this technology was used for?
2) How much research have you secretly conducted on it?
3)… are you going to pay for it?

firebird1.jpg

Randall Mills and the great “disruptive innovation.”

As you know, the term “disruptive innovation” was introduced into science by Professor Clayton Christensen of Harvard Business School back in 1997, in his book “The Innovator’s Dilemma: How Strong Companies Perish because of New Technologies”. At the moment, it is a kind of “cornerstone”, “track star” in the global venture capital industry. Christensen classified innovations as “improving” (gradual improvement of old technologies) and “disruptive” (fundamentally changing, devaluing and replacing old ones).

The history of mankind, both in the past and in the settled decades, is replete with examples of such disruptive innovations.

Gunpowder and firearms based on it supplanted the bow and arrows, the emergence of a steam engine led to the disappearance of sailing ships, internal combustion engines finally “finished off” horse-drawn traction, the invention of refrigerators destroyed the ice-making business, and how many candle factories did the light bulb destroy?
Cell phones almost crowded out wired landlines, e-mail drastically reduced the amount of paper correspondence, “electronic” books are increasingly replacing paper ones, photo technology has almost completely become digital …

This list can be continued for a long time. At the same time, the emergence of a new technology does not necessarily mean the immediate disappearance of the previous one due to its inefficiency. For example, the steam engine and the internal combustion engine coexisted for a long time, while the engine was still not perfect enough, and the steam engine had the opportunity to further increase its efficiency. But this is only the technological aspect of the problem. A much more complicated problem is the problem of the social consequences of this kind of innovation.

Innovations are not immediately radically changing human life. Many “outdated” things remain in demand simply because of the conservatism and low adaptability of a large mass of people. With age, it generally becomes extremely difficult to master the ever-increasing volume of new products. For example, for those who are used to reading books in their “classic” form, to feel their color, volume, and even smell, the choice will almost always be in favor of the paper version. So the printing industry will exist for a long time. However, over time, the process of changing generations will finally take the paper book out of use. While there is still time. But soon the technology of printing will finally be a thing of the past.

The most difficult problem is the problem of the released labor force. In printing, as in its time and in the procurement of ice, not so much workforce is employed. In the case of cab drivers, everything was more complicated. Many of them have not moved to the “iron horses”. It is possible that soon the driver’s profession will start to disappear altogether due to the massive introduction of unmanned vehicles. Where to put the ever-increasing mass of the unemployed? This is an old problem, known since the French proletarians, who were small artisans yesterday, were throwing their wooden shoes (clogs) into the complex mechanisms of factory-made machines. Sabotage has become a common form of social protest against technological progress. A modern, equally ridiculous example is the taxi riot against Uber.

A significant part of the people freed from the old industries will still be able to adapt, and the more perfect the system of governance, education and social support in the country, the less painful the adaptation process will be. The main thing is that these social systems cope with the “volumes” qualitatively. But what will happen if these volumes increase critically?

The era of subsistence farming in most of the planet is a thing of the past. The division of labor has reached its maximum, and has become global. As a result of this process, a large group of countries has emerged, whose well-being largely, if not critically, depends on world market demand and the price of a single commodity. For example, oil. Venezuela and Iran, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, Nigeria and Kuwait. This is a long list of countries. “Black gold” became for them both a great gift and a great curse, since it largely determined the model of socio-economic development. Until recently, these countries were swimming in the flows of petrodollars. Now, after a significant drop in oil prices, the situation has changed, but for now it is not so critical. But what happens if the demand for oil begins to decline even more rapidly? What will happen if whole countries start to be “released” from the world market division of labor? On the example of what is happening in today’s Venezuela, we see possible scenarios …
What will happen if the process of displacing fossil fuels from the global energy balance begins to accelerate, and an avalanche? And such a scenario seems increasingly likely, and here’s why.

To date, the transition to alternative oil sources of energy has been complicated mainly by the inefficiency of alternatives. All alternative oil technologies could hardly be called “disruptive.” Neither solar, nor wind, nor geothermal, nor even atomic energy was a serious alternative to oil, at least on a planetary scale. But in the coming years, the situation may change radically.

October 26, 2016 there was quite an ordinary event. In a small room, designed only for a small audience for interested persons, Brilliant Light Power presented the latest, industrial design of the Sansell reactor (solar cell, SunCell). It was another presentation of an improved prototype, which the company has been conducting regularly since January 2014. It is important to note that this time the company positioned the sample of the reactor as an industrial prototype, that is, almost ready for testing and subsequent mass production. That is, able to work constantly, 24 * 7 * 365.

The appearance of Sunsell became possible as a result of the long and persistent efforts of the head of the company, Dr. Randall Mills. The result of a long, twenty-five years of work. The work is both practical and theoretical, since Sunsell is based on a completely new physical theory called “The Grand Unified Theory of Classical Physics” (GUT-CP) by Dr. Mills, “The Big Unified Theory of Classical Physics”. It is characteristic that the Mills theory fundamentally contradicts the currently dominant physical theory — quantum mechanics. However, Dr. Mills considers quantum mechanics “just a bad theory.” Well, he can afford it, since he proposed a much more effective alternative.

In addition to a number of others, the most important theoretical discovery of GUT-CP’s theory by Dr. Mills was the idea of ​​hydrino — a particularly compact state of the hydrogen atom, which is essentially the so-called “dark matter” in our Universe. The transformation of ordinary hydrogen into hydrino occurs during the so-called BLP process (BLP-process), a special catalytic process, with an output of enormous energy, hundreds of times greater than when burning hydrogen. The voron – argon mixture is used as a “fuel,” and molten silver is used as a catalyst. The product of the transformation of hydrogen into hydrino is the so-called “hydrino gas”. Extremely light and inert in its chemical properties, it cannot be held by gravity, as a result of which it is carried off into space.

Due to the fact that the emitted radiation is mainly in the invisible range (ultraviolet), it can not be absorbed by solar panels directly. Therefore, the design of the reactor uses the so-called “black body”, a graphite sphere, which absorbs ultraviolet light and emits it already in the visible range, suitable for operating the most efficient three-layer solar panels.

In turn, solar panels serve as a kind of compact “Dyson sphere”, absorbing the energy of thousands of suns.
firebird2

It is noteworthy that the reactor has a very simple design, with a minimum of moving parts. For example, two electromagnetic pumps are used as pumps for molten silver, as well as a “liquid electrode” modulator, so that opposite jets of melted silver converge in opposition in the center of a hot sphere (there is a video of the process on the digging site). This design makes the reactor cheap, simple and almost maintenance free. The main factor both in price and durability of the reactor is solar panels. At the moment, it is planned to use solar panels by Masimo (Masimo semiconductor), with a thirty-year history of work in this area. The declared life of the solar panels is more than 20 years.
Thus, the twenty-five-year work of Mills achieved the goal: confirmation of the correctness of his theory, its practical embodiment was a compact, and incredibly powerful source of energy. Which, according to the announced plan, should enter the market after industrial testing, in the second half of 2017.

SunCell-110716-web-new.png
Fig. from http://brilliantlightpower.com/

Now, back to the original question of this article: Is the Sunsell technology a so-called “disruptive innovation”? An innovation that can drastically change the face of the entire energy industry, and of the planet as a whole?

That is the goal stated by Dr. Randall Mills. And it seems that he is right. Because, at the moment there is no other source of energy so compact, so powerful, so cheap. Of course, it is a brilliant alternative to fossil fuels that can replace it in the vast majority of areas. Finally, humanity will stop, in the words of the great Russian chemist Mendeleev, “drown the stove with banknotes”, burning the most valuable mineral raw materials, and at the same time polluting the earth’s atmosphere. And this is a matter of time.
But this is the main question: what time? And what social and economic consequences will result from the introduction of this truly great innovation?

Of course, the main thing that awaits us is the “great infrastructure transition,” on a planetary scale. This is a question of quite a long time, perhaps several decades. Of course, fossil fuels will not be squeezed out of the energy market tomorrow. But in the perspective of 10-15 years, it will begin to happen inevitably. And the farther, the more, and over time, the process of introducing a new technology will acquire an avalanche-like character, causing not only fundamental technological, but also social changes. Preserving smoothness and stability during this transition is a complex managerial task on a global scale that requires both comprehensive thinking and the creation of international mechanisms that facilitate the transition, compensating for possible negative socio-economic consequences, especially in “oil” countries.

There is still time, and it is necessary to use it. This is especially true of the “oil” countries, which are well prepared for the possible socio-economic turbulence caused by structural changes in the economy. As Steven Chu, an American physicist and Nobel Prize winner, former US Secretary of Energy in the United States, said, “the Stone Age did not end because humanity ended up with stones,” meaning that the oil age would end not because oil would end. Looks like he was right.
firebird3

Chemistry, cosmology, Dark Matter, Futurism, GUT-CP, hydrino, New elements, particle physics, physics, Randell Mills, technology

1st International Conference On The Grand Unified Theory Of Classical Physics?… Anyone? VIENNA! :D

“Well I’m thinking of TedTalk… meh? Brett Holverstott may be interested.

But I’m thinking The Society For Classical Physics was up and running for fifteen years, Mills has slowly built support and confirmation since the inception, there’s physicists and theoreticians from London to Russia to India to Japan to South Korea to New Zealand to Italy… that are at least open to The Grand Unified Theory Of Classical Physics… some people are hailing it as the greatest scientific work since Newton Principia… they want Standard Model and Quantum in the dustbin of history… organise an international conference!
I’m thinking Vienna! Just to take the piss! 😀 On a number of levels.
(that and the U.S may not let me in)

vienna2

ICGUTP 2018 : 20th International Conference on Grand Unified Theory of Physics
San Francisco, USA
June 6 – 7, 2018

Climate Change, Dark Matter, Futurism, Global Warming, GUT-CP, hydrino, Randell Mills, SunCell, technology

“It’s like there’s some cabal of physicists that wants everybody to be stupid.” – Scientist claims dark matter-powered device can create nearly limitless energy

“It’s like there’s some cabal of physicists that wants everybody to be stupid.” – Dr Randell Mills
“Most people want to be stupid… it’s a form of cowardice” – Danny Hurley

stupid
“The risk for me turning to the dark side… stupid people… I don’t think they should be allowed to breed, to even live on this planet… kind of with the Rockefellers and Rothschilds on that one!”

Scientist claims dark matter-powered device can create nearly limitless energy

New Jersey scientist says his research is a revolution, but it flies in the face of accepted physics.
By Sam Newhouse
millssun

A scientist working in a lab in central New Jersey says he has discovered a nearly limitless source of energy that can solve the world’s energy problems.

There’s just one problem: most scientists think it’s baloney.

But Dr. Randell Mills, inventor of the Suncell, has no doubt that his device could change the world.

“It is the pinnacle of the quest for the ultimate power source,” said Dr. Mills during an interview at Brilliant Light Power’s laboratory. “It’s not a theory. What I did was just to take the natural laws, Newton’s laws from the 1600s and Maxwell’s laws from the 1800s, and use them to solve structurally what the atom is.”

The Suncell is based on Mills’ concept of the hydrino, which arises from his personal Grand Unified Theory of Classical Physics.

Hydrinos are created by compacting the orbital of electrons in the hydrogen atoms found in water, Mills said. This creates the hydrino, a form of dark matter, which releases tremendous light and energy, hotter than the surface of the sun. If captured through technology like solar panels, it could power cars, computers, home heating – everything, he believes.

What do other scientists have to say about it? “La-la land,” said one. “BS,” said another.
None agreed to go on the record discussing hydrinos. But their skepticism relates to the fact that the concept of the hydrino defies most of quantum mechanics and its understanding of subatomic particles.

No problem, Mills said. Quantum mechanics is wrong.

“I’m saying ‘physical laws apply to atoms.’ That’s provable,” he said. “They say the universe is pure math. … It’s like there’s some cabal of physicists that wants everybody to be stupid.”

Mills isn’t completely alone in his quest. Bucknell University professor and engineer Peter Mark Jansson ran experiments on the hydrino in 2010 at Rowan University, partly funded by Mills. He found the process was creating energy.

“There has got to be something in the reaction itself that creates this extremely high energy reaction,” Jansson said. “Dr. Mills and his scientists believe it is the hydrino formation. … They believe they’ve found the greatest discovery in recent history.”
Jansson argued that while Mills’ theories may not be accepted by mainstream science, he doesn’t think most scientists have given them a fair consideration.

“I have heard Nobel laureates say it’s a scam,” Jansson said. “How can you say that if you haven’t done an experiment and tried to prove whether or not these guys are onto something novel?”

For Mills, who has been toiling on his project for more than two decades, it’s just a matter of perfecting the technology. So far, the hydrino has blown up or melted most of the devices he used to create it, he said. But Brilliant Light Power aims to soon be marketing Suncells that can help heat homes.

“Early on, I was subject to a lot of attacks,” he acknowledged. “Now we’re just refining it, and we’ll have a first model of a heater product … We wouldn’t have to pollute as much. That should really accelerate our quality of life.”

stupid1

Article, Astro-biology, astro-physics, Dark Matter, Extra-terrestrial, SPECULATION!, UFOs

Aliens and Dark Matter! :D … it’s a Friday! Why not? JUST SPECULATING!

“There seems to be some talk of possible patent infringement of Mills’s technology in regards to Evaco LLC
Startup files patent on energetic heater using “hydrino” reaction as source of power.

“I don’t see this as being a threat to BLP, although industrial espionage and theft is likely to happen in the future (if not already)… Russia, China, Israel, South Korea?
Interestingly enough, the founder of Evaco is backed by the Du Pont family. 😀 (“the cunning, c*****g, shitty little Illuminati, Du Pont ponce family” according to some!)

Anyway… it’s Friday night. I have a glass of whiskey… we’re discussing the possibility of extra-terrestrial lifeforms or intelligences existing within ‘Dark Matter’… purely speculation and conjecture of course!

My thoughts are, such ‘beings’ could well be hiding within ‘dark matter’, and humans are not able to perceive them, either with technology developed or with the senses evolution has equipped us with… unless of course possibly with the pineal gland, which is mysteriously a light sensitive lens… what about whilst under the influence of Ayahuasca? DMT? What if such substances gave human consciousness a glimpse into the realm of dark matter?
Also the UFO phenomena is way stranger and unexplainable than humans can possibly comprehend when you actually look into it… they often seem to materialise and dematerialise at will, can seemingly ‘fly’ through solid objects… as well as defy the current known laws of physics… I would say again, if an advanced species is piloting such crafts… look into dark matter.

Besides, I don’t take the subject too seriously… not as seriously as say… The Knights Malta or The Vatican Jesuits do! ;D

angel

Is Physical Law an Alien Intelligence?

Alien life could be so advanced it becomes indistinguishable from physics.
By Caleb Scharf (Director Of Astrobiology, Columbia University)

Perhaps Arthur C. Clarke was being uncharacteristically unambitious. He once pointed out that any sufficiently advanced technology is going to be indistinguishable from magic. If you dropped in on a bunch of Paleolithic farmers with your iPhone and a pair of sneakers, you’d undoubtedly seem pretty magical. But the contrast is only middling: The farmers would still recognize you as basically like them, and before long they’d be taking selfies. But what if life has moved so far on that it doesn’t just appear magical, but appears like physics?
After all, if the cosmos holds other life, and if some of that life has evolved beyond our own waypoints of complexity and technology, we should be considering some very extreme possibilities. Today’s futurists and believers in a machine “singularity” predict that life and its technological baggage might end up so beyond our ken that we wouldn’t even realize we were staring at it. That’s quite a claim, yet it would neatly explain why we have yet to see advanced intelligence in the cosmos around us, despite the sheer number of planets it could have arisen on—the so-called Fermi Paradox.
dark.png

For example, if machines continue to grow exponentially in speed and sophistication, they will one day be able to decode the staggering complexity of the living world, from its atoms and molecules all the way up to entire planetary biomes. Presumably life doesn’t have to be made of atoms and molecules, but could be assembled from any set of building blocks with the requisite complexity. If so, a civilization could then transcribe itself and its entire physical realm into new forms. Indeed, perhaps our universe is one of the new forms into which some other civilization transcribed its world.
These possibilities might seem wholly untestable, because part of the conceit is that sufficiently advanced life will not just be unrecognizable as such, but will blend completely into the fabric of what we’ve thought of as nature. But viewed through the warped bottom of a beer glass, we can pick out a few cosmic phenomena that—at crazy as it sounds—might fit the requirements.

These possibilities might seem wholly untestable, because part of the conceit is that sufficiently advanced life will not just be unrecognizable as such, but will blend completely into the fabric of what we’ve thought of as nature. But viewed through the warped bottom of a beer glass, we can pick out a few cosmic phenomena that—at crazy as it sounds—might fit the requirements.

For example, only about 5 percent of the mass-energy of the universe consists of ordinary matter: the protons, neutrons, and electrons that we’re composed of. A much larger 27 percent is thought to be unseen, still mysterious stuff. Astronomical evidence for this dark, gravitating matter is convincing, albeit still not without question. Vast halos of dark matter seem to lurk around galaxies, providing mass that helps hold things together via gravity. On even larger scales, the web-like topography traced by luminous gas and stars also hints at unseen mass.

Cosmologists usually assume that dark matter has no microstructure. They think it consists of subatomic particles that interact only via gravity and the weak nuclear force and therefore slump into tenuous, featureless swathes. They have arguments to support this point of view, but of course we don’t really know for sure. Some astronomers, noting subtle mismatches between observations and models, have suggested that dark matter has a richer inner life. At least some component may comprise particles that interact with one another via long-range forces. It may seem dark to us, but have its own version of light that our eyes cannot see.
dark1

In that case, dark matter could contain real complexity, and perhaps it is where all technologically advanced life ends up or where most life has always been. What better way to escape the nasty vagaries of supernova and gamma-ray bursts than to adopt a form that is immune to electromagnetic radiation? Upload your world to the huge amount of real estate on the dark side and be done with it.
If you’re a civilization that has learned how to encode living systems in different substrates, all you need to do is build a normal-matter-to-dark-matter data-transfer system: a dark-matter 3D printer. Perhaps the mismatch of astronomical models and observations is evidence not just of self-interacting dark matter, but of dark matter that is being artificially manipulated.

Or to take this a step further, perhaps the behavior of normal cosmic matter that we attribute to dark matter is brought on by something else altogether: a living state that manipulates luminous matter for its own purposes. Consider that at present we have neither identified the dark-matter particles nor come up with a compelling alternative to our laws of physics that would account for the behavior of galaxies and clusters of galaxies. Would an explanation in terms of life be any less plausible than a failure of established laws?

“Part of the fabric of the universe is a product of intelligence.”

The universe does other funky and unexpected stuff. Notably, it began to expand at an accelerated rate about 5 billion years ago. This acceleration is conventionally chalked up to dark energy. But cosmologists don’t know why the cosmic acceleration began when it did. In fact, one explanation with a modicum of traction is that the timing has to do with life—an anthropic argument. The dark energy didn’t become significant until enough time had gone by for life to take hold on Earth. For many cosmologists, that means our universe must be part of a vast multiverse where the strength of dark energy varies from place to place. We live in one of the places suitable for life like us. Elsewhere, dark energy is stronger and blows the universe apart too quickly for cosmic structures to form and life to take root.
But perhaps there is another reason for the timing coincidence: that dark energy is related to the activities of living things. After all, any very early life in the universe would have already experienced 8 billion years of evolutionary time by the time expansion began to accelerate. It’s a stretch, but maybe there’s something about life itself that affects the cosmos, or maybe those well-evolved denizens decided to tinker with the expansion.
dark2

There are even possible motivations for that action. Life absorbs low-entropy energy (such as visible light from the sun), does useful work with that energy, and dumps higher-entropy energy back into the universe as waste heat. But if the surrounding universe ever got too warm—too filled with thermal refuse—things would stagnate. Luckily we live in an expanding and constantly cooling cosmos. What better long-term investment by some hypothetical life 5 billion years ago than to get the universe to cool even faster? To be sure, it may come to rue its decision: Hundreds of billions of years later the accelerating expansion would dilute matter so quickly that civilizations would run out of fresh sources of energy. Also, an accelerating universe does not cool forever, but eventually approaches a floor in temperature.
One idea for the mechanism of an accelerating cosmic expansion is called quintessence, a relative of the Higgs field that permeates the cosmos. Perhaps some clever life 5 billion years ago figured out how to activate that field. How? Beats me, but it’s a thought-provoking idea, and it echoes some of the thinking of cosmologist Freeman Dyson’s famous 1979 paper “Time Without End,” where he looked at life’s ability in the far, far future to act on an astrophysical scale.

Once we start proposing that life could be part of the solution to cosmic mysteries, there’s no end to the fun possibilities. Although dark-matter life is a pretty exotic idea, it’s still conceivable that we might recognize what it is, even capturing it in our labs one day (or being captured by it). We can take a tumble down a different rabbit hole by considering that we don’t recognize advanced life because it forms an integral and unsuspicious part of what we’ve considered to be the natural world.
Life’s desire to avoid trouble points to some options. If it has a choice, life always looks for ways to lower its existential risk. You don’t build your nest on the weakest branch or produce trillions of single-celled clones unless you build in some variation and backup.
Maybe there’s something about life itself that affects the cosmos.
A species can mitigate risk by spreading, decentralizing, and seeding as much real estate as possible. In this context, hyper-advanced life is going to look for ways to get rid of physical locality and to maximize redundancy and flexibility. The quantum realm offers good options. The cosmos is already packed with electromagnetic energy. Today, at any instant, about 400 photons of cosmic microwave radiation are streaming through any cubic centimeter of free space. They collectively have less energy than ordinary particles such as protons and electrons, but vastly outnumber them. That’s a lot of potential data carriers. Furthermore, we could imagine that these photons are cleverly quantum-mechanically entangled to help with error control.
By storing its essential data in photons, life could give itself a distributed backup system. And it could go further, manipulating new photons emitted by stars to dictate how they interact with matter. Fronts of electromagnetic radiation could be reaching across the cosmos to set in motion chains of interstellar or planetary chemistry with exquisite timing, exploiting wave interference and excitation energies in atoms and molecules. The science-fiction writer Stanisław Lem put forward a similar idea, involving neutrinos rather than photons, in the novel His Master’s Voice.

“That’s one way that life could disappear into ordinary physics. But even these ideas skirt the most disquieting extrapolations.”

Toward the end of Carl Sagan’s 1985 science-fiction novel Contact, the protagonist follows the suggestion of an extraterrestrial to study transcendental numbers. After computing to 1020 places, she finds a clearly artificial message embedded in the digits of this fundamental number. In other words, part of the fabric of the universe is a product of intelligence or is perhaps even life itself.
It’s a great mind-bending twist for a book. Perhaps hyper-advanced life isn’t just external. Perhaps it’s already all around. It is embedded in what we perceive to be physics itself, from the root behavior of particles and fields to the phenomena of complexity and emergence.

“In other words, life might not just be in the equations. It might be the equations.”

Caleb Scharf is an astrophysicist, the Director of Astrobiology at Columbia University in New York, and a founder of yhousenyc.org, an institute that studies human and machine consciousness. His latest book is The Copernicus Complex: Our Cosmic Significance in a Universe of Planets and Probabilities.

aliens

Does Dark Matter Harbor Life?

An invisible civilization could be living right under your nose.
By Lisa Randall
aya1 - Copy

Even though we know that ordinary matter accounts for only about one-twentieth of the universe’s energy and a sixth of the total energy carried by matter (with dark energy constituting the remaining portion), we nonetheless consider ordinary matter to be the truly important constituent. With the exception of cosmologists, almost everyone’s attention is focused on the ordinary matter component, which you might have thought to be largely insignificant according to the energy accounting.
We of course care more about ordinary matter because we are made of the stuff—as is the tangible world in which we live. But we also pay attention because of the richness of its interactions. Ordinary matter interacts through the electromagnetic, the weak, and the strong nuclear forces—helping the visible matter of our world to form complex, dense systems. Not only stars, but also rocks, oceans, plants, and animals owe their very existence to the nongravitational forces of nature through which ordinary matter interacts. Just as a beer’s small-percentage alcohol content affects carousers far more than the rest of the drink, ordinary matter, though carrying a small percentage of the energy density, influences itself and its surroundings much more noticeably than something that just passes through.

Familiar visible matter can be thought of as the privileged percent—actually more like 15 percent—of matter. In business and politics, the interacting 1 percent dominates decision making and policy, while the remaining 99 percent of the population provides less widely acknowledged infrastructure and support—maintaining buildings, keeping cities operational, and getting food to people’s tables. Similarly, ordinary matter dominates almost everything we notice, whereas dark matter, in its abundance and ubiquity, helped create clusters and galaxies and facilitated star formation, but has only limited influence on our immediate surroundings today.
It seems very odd to assume that all of dark matter is composed of only one type of particle.
For nearby structure, ordinary matter is in charge. It is responsible for the motion of our bodies, the energy sources that drive our economy, the computer screen or paper on which you are reading this, and basically anything else you can think of or care about. If something has measurable interactions, it is worth paying attention to, as it will have far more immediate effects on whatever is around.
In the usual scenario, dark matter lacks this type of interesting influence and structure. The common assumption is that dark matter is the “glue” that holds together galaxies and galaxy clusters, but resides only in amorphous clouds around them. But what if this assumption isn’t true and it is only our prejudice—and ignorance, which is after all the root of most prejudice—that led us down this potentially misleading path?
space.png
Hidden Dark Matter? Warped galaxy clusters could indicate the presence of dark matter.
NASA

The Standard Model contains six types of quarks, three types of charged leptons (including the electron), three species of neutrinos, all the particles responsible for forces, as well as the newly discovered Higgs boson. What if the world of dark matter—if not equally rich—is reasonably wealthy too? In this case, most dark matter interacts only negligibly, but a small component of dark matter would interact under forces reminiscent of those in ordinary matter. The rich and complex structure of the Standard Model’s particles and forces gives rise to many of the world’s interesting phenomena. If dark matter has an interacting component, this fraction might be influential too.

If we were creatures made of dark matter, we would be very wrong to assume that the particles in our ordinary matter sector were all of the same type. Perhaps we ordinary matter people are making a similar mistake. Given the complexity of the Standard Model of particle physics, which describes the most basic components of matter we know of, it seems very odd to assume that all of dark matter is composed of only one type of particle. Why not suppose instead that some fraction of the dark matter experiences its own forces?
In that case, just as ordinary matter consists of different types of particles and these fundamental building blocks interact through different combinations of charges, dark matter would also have different building blocks—and at least one of those distinct new particle types would experience nongravitational interactions. Neutrinos in the Standard Model don’t interact under the strong or electric force yet the six types of quarks do.
No one had allowed for the very simple possibility that although most dark matter doesn’t interact, a small fraction of it might.

In a similar fashion, maybe one type of dark matter particle experiences feeble or no interactions aside from gravity, but a fraction of it—perhaps 5 percent—does. Based on what we’ve seen in the world of ordinary matter, perhaps this scenario is even more likely than the usual assumption of a single very feebly or non-interacting dark matter particle.

People in foreign relations make a mistake when they lump together another country’s cultures—assuming they don’t exhibit the diversity of societies that is evident in our own. Just as a good negotiator doesn’t assume the primacy of one sector of society over another when attempting to place the different cultures on equal footing, an unbiased scientist shouldn’t assume that dark matter isn’t as interesting as ordinary matter and necessarily lacks a diversity of matter similar to our own.

The science writer Corey S. Powell, when reporting on our research in Discover magazine, started his piece by announcing that he was a “light-matter chauvinist”—and pointing out that virtually everyone else is too. By this he meant that we view the type of matter we are familiar with as by far the most significant and therefore the most complex and interesting. It’s the type of belief that you might have thought was upended by the Copernican Revolution. Yet most people persist in assuming that their perspective and their conviction of our importance are in keeping with the external world.
Ordinary matter’s many components have different interactions and contribute to the world in different ways. So too might dark matter have different particles with different behaviors that might influence the universe’s structure in a measurable fashion.

When first studying partially interacting dark matter, I was astonished to find that practically no one had considered the potential fallacy—and hubris—of assuming that only ordinary matter exhibits a diversity of particle types and interactions. A few physicists had tried to analyze models, such as “mirror dark matter,” which features dark matter that mimics everything about ordinary matter. But exemplars such as this one were rather specific and exotic. Their implications were difficult to reconcile with everything we know.

A small community of physicists had studied more general models of interacting dark matter. But even they assumed that all the dark matter was the same and therefore experienced identical forces. No one had allowed for the very simple possibility that although most dark matter doesn’t interact, a small fraction of it might.

You have no idea how cute dark matter life could be—and you almost certainly never will.

One potential reason might be apparent. Most people would expect a new type of dark matter to be irrelevant to most measurable phenomena if the extra component constitutes only a small fraction of the dark matter inventory. Having not even observed the dominant component of dark matter, concerning oneself with a smaller constituent might seem premature.

But when you remember that ordinary matter carries only about 20 percent of the energy of dark matter—yet it’s essentially all that most of us pay attention to—you can see where this logic could be flawed. Matter interacting via stronger nongravitational forces can be more interesting and more influential even than a larger amount of feebly interacting matter.

We’ve seen that this is true for ordinary matter. Ordinary matter is unduly influential given its meager abundance because it collapses into a dense matter disk where stars, planets, the Earth, and even life could form. A charged dark matter component—though not necessarily quite as bountiful—can collapse to form disks like the visible one in the Milky Way too. It might even fragment into starlike objects. This new disklike structure can in principle be observed, and might even prove to be more accessible than the conventional dominant cold dark matter component that is spread more diffusely in an enormous spherical halo.

Once you start thinking along these lines, the possibilities quickly multiply. After all, electromagnetism is only one of several nongravitational forces experienced by Standard Model particles. In addition to the force that binds electrons to nuclei, the Standard Model particles of our world interact via the weak and strong nuclear forces. Still more forces might be present in the world of ordinary matter, but they would have to be extremely weak at accessible energies since so far, no one has observed any sign of them. But even the presence of three nongravitational forces suggests that the interacting dark sector too might experience nongravitational forces other than just dark electromagnetism.

Perhaps nuclear-type forces act on dark particles in addition to the electromagnetic-type one. In this even richer scenario, dark stars could form that undergo nuclear burning to create structures that behave even more similarly to ordinary matter than the dark matter I have so far described. In that case, the dark disk could be populated by dark stars surrounded by dark planets made up of dark atoms. Double-disk dark matter might then have all of the same complexity of ordinary matter.

Partially interacting dark matter certainly makes for fertile ground for speculation and encourages us to consider possibilities we otherwise might not have. Writers and moviegoers especially would find a scenario with such additional forces and consequences in the dark sector very enticing. They would probably even suggest dark life coexisting with our own. In this scenario, rather than the usual animated creatures fighting other animated creatures or on rare occasions cooperating with them, armies of dark matter creatures could march across the screen and monopolize all the action.
But this wouldn’t be too interesting to watch. The problem is that cinematographers would have trouble filming this dark life, which is of course invisible to us—and to them. Even if the dark creatures were there (and maybe they have been) we wouldn’t know.

You have no idea how cute dark matter life could be—and you almost certainly never will.

Though it’s entertaining to speculate about the possibility of dark life, it’s a lot harder to figure out a way to observe it—or even detect its existence in more indirect ways. It’s challenging enough to find life made up of the same stuff we are, though extrasolar planet searches are under way and trying hard. But the evidence for dark life, should it exist, would be far more elusive even than the evidence for ordinary life in distant realms.

“Dark life could in principle be present—even right under our noses.” 

We have only recently finally seen gravity waves from enormous black holes. We stand little to no chance of detecting the gravitational effect of a dark creature, or even an army of dark creatures—no matter how close all of them might be.

Ideally, we would want somehow to communicate with this new sector—or have it correspond with us in some distinctive manner. But if this new life doesn’t experience the same forces that we do, that’s not going to happen. Even though we share gravity, the force exerted by a small object or life-form would almost certainly be too weak to detect. Only very big dark objects, like a disk extending throughout the Milky Way plane, could have visible consequences.

Dark objects or dark life could be very close—but if the dark stuff’s net mass isn’t very big, we wouldn’t have any way to know. Even with the most current technology, or any technology that we can currently imagine, only some very specialized possibilities might be testable. “Shadow life,” exciting as that would be, won’t necessarily have any visible consequences that we would notice, making it a tantalizing possibility but one immune to observations. In fairness, dark life is a tall order. Science-fiction writers may have no problem creating it, but the universe has a lot more obstacles to overcome. Out of all possible chemistries, it’s very unclear how many could sustain life, and even among those that could, we don’t know the type of environments that would be necessary.

Nonetheless, dark life could in principle be present—even right under our noses. But without stronger interactions with the matter of our world, it can be partying or fighting or active or inert and we would never know. But the interesting thing is that if there are interactions in the dark world—whether or not they are associated with life—the effects on structure might ultimately be measured. And then we will learn a great deal more about the dark world.

Lisa Randall is the Frank B. Baird, Jr., Professor of Science at Harvard University, where she studies theoretical particle physics and cosmology. @lirarandall

From the book Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs by Lisa Randall. Copyright @ 2015 by Lisa Randall.aya - Copy

Dark matter may be a manifestation of extremely advanced alien life, researchers suggest

by Mihai Andrei

Our limited understanding of dark matter and the fact that we’re focusing on the wrong things might be preventing us from discovering alien life.

This collage shows NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope images of six different galaxy clusters, with the distribution of dark matter colored in blue.

A Cosmic Gorilla
You know that experiment where you’re supposed to count the number of basketball passes, and you’re so focused on the ball that you don’t even see a bear moving through the picture? Researchers believe something similar might be happening on a cosmic scale. We’re so focused on one thing that we’re completely missing the other — and in this case, ‘the other’ might mean alien signals.
Writing in the journal Acta Astronautica, neuropsychologists Gabriel de la Torre and Manuel García, from the University of Cádiz, say that when it comes to detecting alien signals, we might be looking in the wrong direction. They say that we’re looking for aliens that act similarly to us when that might really not be the case.

“When we think of other intelligent beings, we tend to see them from our perceptive and conscience sieve; however we are limited by our sui generis vision of the world, and it’s hard for us to admit it,” says De la Torre, who prefers to avoid the terms ‘extraterrestrial’ or aliens by its Hollywood connotations and uses more generic terms, such as ‘non-terrestrial’.
“What we are trying to do with this differentiation is to contemplate other possibilities,” he says “for example, beings of dimensions that our mind cannot grasp; or intelligences based on dark matter or energy forms, which make up almost 95% of the universe and which we are only beginning to glimpse. There is even the possibility that other universes exist, as the texts of Stephen Hawking and other scientists indicate.”

Hardwired to miss it
In order to test their hypothesis, they had 137 people distinguish aerial photographs with artificial structures (such as buildings or roads) from others with natural elements (such as mountains or rivers). In one of the images, a tiny character disguised as a gorilla was inserted to see if the participants noticed. As expected, participants tended to miss the gorilla. It’s normal because we’re hardwired to miss it — we’re looking for something else. Similarly, if we’re looking for a specific kind of signal, we might completely miss an unrelated type of signal, one we weren’t expecting.
“If we transfer this to the problem of searching for other non-terrestrial intelligences, the question arises about whether our current strategy may result in us not perceiving the gorilla,” stresses the researcher, who insists: “Our traditional conception of space is limited by our brain, and we may have the signs above and be unable to see them. Maybe we’re not looking in the right direction.”
In another example presented in the article, researchers showed participants an apparently geometric structure that can be seen in the images of Occator — an impact crater of the dwarf planet Ceres, famous for its bright spots. Inside the crater appears a strange structure, looking like a square inside a triangle. The point researchers were trying to make is that we sometimes see patterns that just aren’t there, due to the way our brains are wired.
“Our structured mind tells us that this structure looks like a triangle with a square inside, something that theoretically is not possible in Ceres,” says De la Torre, “but maybe we are seeing things where there are none, what in psychology is called pareidolia.”

But the opposite might also be happening, they say. We might have the signal right in front of our eyes, and simply miss it — kind of like a cosmic gorilla effect.

Types of civilizations
We’re not really sure what to expect in terms of potentially advanced alien species, but the most commonly used scale is the Kardashev scale, proposed by Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev. The scale has three main categories, and it focuses on different stages of energy capture and use, which seems to be a vital requirement for an advanced species:
A Type I civilization (a planetary civilization) can use and store all of the energy which reaches its planet from the parent star.
A Type II civilization (a stellar civilization) can harness the total energy of its planet’s parent star and use it on a planet.
A Type III civilization (a galactic civilization) can control energy on the scale of its entire host galaxy.
If you’ll look at it closely, you’ll see that humans aren’t really even on a Type I level yet, so the Kardashev scale has been extended, both upwards and downwards, including:
A Type 0 civilization (humans) that harvests a significant part of its planet energy, just not yet to its full potential.
A Type IV civilization (a universal civilization) that can control energy on the scale of the entire universe. This is already a virtually indestructible civilization. This hypothetical civilization would be able to interact with and harvest dark matter and dark energy.
A type V civilization (a multiversal civilization) — this already steps into the realm of metaphysics and assumes there is more than one universe, and a civilization that’s able to span and populate several universes.
A type VI civilization (deities) that would have the ability to interact with universes outside of time and space, similar in concept to an absolute deity.

Already, it’s becoming quite clear that we don’t even know how to understand very advanced alien civilizations, assuming that they exist. We might be able to understand a Type 0, I, or II civilization, assuming that they do share some similarities with us. But should we come across the higher levels of civilization, would we even realize what we’re looking at? This is what de la Torre and Garcia are asking. For all we know, dark matter and dark energy might hold the traces of such an advanced civilization. Of course, the researchers themselves admit the inherent shortcomings when you’re classifying something you know nothing about.
“We were well aware that the existing classifications are too simplistic and are generally only based on the energy aspect. The fact that we use radio signals does not necessarily mean that other civilizations also use them, or that the use of energy resources and their dependence are the same as we have,” the researchers point out, recalling the theoretical nature of their proposals.
The duo also proposes a different civilization scale, with 3 types. Type 1 is essentially ours, ephemeral, vulnerable to a planetary cataclysm, either natural or self-made. Type 2 is characterized by the longevity of its members, able to explore galaxies and overall much more durable. Type 3, as you’d expect, would be constituted by exotic creatures with eternal or near-eternal life, with an absolute dominion over the universe.
Naturally, this is all a bit speculative. We don’t really know whether we’re looking for the right thing or not, we don’t even know if there is a right thing or not. How likely are we to miss an alien signal, in the case that it exists? Impossible to tell right now. So this study definitely goes a bit ‘out there’, but it poses some intriguing questions.
If anything, the main takeaway is that we should perhaps take a step back and reconsider what alien life might look like. In other words, we shouldn’t only be counting the passes — we should keep an eye out for any gorillas.
Journal Reference: Gabriel G. De la Torre, Manuel A. Garcia. The cosmic gorilla effect or the problem of undetected non terrestrial intelligent signals. Acta Astronautica, 2018; 146: 83 DOI: 10.1016/j.actaastro.2018.02.036

aya3 - Copy

‘Dark matter’ aliens here on Earth? Could be, scientists say

Dan Satherley

Have we been looking for aliens in the wrong place this whole time?
Researchers are now seriously considering the possibility if they exist, we won’t find evidence in outer space, but right here on Earth – only invisible to the eye.
“When we think of other intelligent beings, we tend to see them from our perceptive and conscience sieve; however we are limited by our unique vision of the world, and it’s hard for us to admit it,” says Gabriel de la Torre of the University of Cadiz in Spain.
He’s proposed rather than looking for radio signals, gamma ray bursts and alien probes, scientists should be looking for signs of ET in dark matter.
Dark matter and energy are believed to make up 95 percent of the universe’s total energy. The stuff we can see is only 5 percent.

It’s not even a certainty that dark matter exists, but without it much of what scientists know about universe doesn’t add up. Scientists believe dark energy is what’s driving the universe apart, and dark matter is what’s holding galaxies together.
They don’t interact with the matter and energy we know of, except through gravity.
“What we are trying to do with this differentiation is to contemplate other possibilities – for example, beings of dimensions that our mind cannot grasp, or intelligences based on dark matter or energy forms, which make up almost 95 percent of the universe and which we are only beginning to glimpse.”

There could be dark matter passing through us right now, and unless we had state-of-the-art scientific instruments to measure it, we wouldn’t even know.
“The fact that we use radio signals does not necessarily mean that other civilizations also use them, or that the use of energy resources and their dependence are the same as we have,” says Dr de la Torre.

Have we been looking for aliens in the wrong place this whole time?
Researchers are now seriously considering the possibility if they exist, we won’t find evidence in outer space, but right here on Earth – only invisible to the eye.
“When we think of other intelligent beings, we tend to see them from our perceptive and conscience sieve; however we are limited by our unique vision of the world, and it’s hard for us to admit it,” says Gabriel de la Torre of the University of Cadiz in Spain.
He’s proposed rather than looking for radio signals, gamma ray bursts and alien probes, scientists should be looking for signs of ET in dark matter.
Dark matter and energy are believed to make up 95 percent of the universe’s total energy. The stuff we can see is only 5 percent.
The unstoppable bubble that could destroy the universe
Aerospace boss believes aliens live on Earth
It’s not even a certainty that dark matter exists, but without it much of what scientists know about universe doesn’t add up. Scientists believe dark energy is what’s driving the universe apart, and dark matter is what’s holding galaxies together.
They don’t interact with the matter and energy we know of, except through gravity.
“What we are trying to do with this differentiation is to contemplate other possibilities – for example, beings of dimensions that our mind cannot grasp, or intelligences based on dark matter or energy forms, which make up almost 95 percent of the universe and which we are only beginning to glimpse.”
Are UFOs and psychics real? CIA files give an answer
Astronomers discover galaxy with no dark matter
There could be dark matter passing through us right now, and unless we had state-of-the-art scientific instruments to measure it, we wouldn’t even know.
“The fact that we use radio signals does not necessarily mean that other civilizations also use them, or that the use of energy resources and their dependence are the same as we have,” says Dr de la Torre.

“We can have the signal in front of us and not perceive it or be unable to identify it… In fact, it could have happened in the past or it could be happening right now.”

Gabriel de la Torre’s ideas were published in the latest issue of scientific journal Acta Astronautica.