Climate Change, energy, Environment, Evolution, Global Warming, Natural Law, Planet Earth

Apocalypse Now!… Averting the collapse of civilisation? pffffft! :/

“Well… I can only see one way this is going to go… a global cull of the human species. No-one wants to publicly admit it, but we’ve evolved into two separate species…. we have the greatest discovery this species ahs ever made (GUT-CP)… if it’s a choice between throwing it in the dustbin of history or culling a few billion people… I’m going with GUT-CP.”

“While some members of society might raise the alarm that the system is moving towards an impending collapse and therefore advocate structural changes to society in order to avoid it, Elites and their supporters, who opposed making these changes, could point to the long sustainable trajectory ‘so far’ in support of doing nothing.”

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David Attenborough: collapse of civilisation is on the horizon

Naturalist tells leaders at UN climate summit that fate of world is in their hands

“Right now we are facing a manmade disaster of global scale, our greatest threat in thousands of years: climate change,” he said. “If we don’t take action, the collapse of our civilisations and the extinction of much of the natural world is on the horizon.”

Nasa-funded study: industrial civilisation headed for ‘irreversible collapse’?

Natural and social scientists develop new model of how ‘perfect storm’ of crises could unravel global system

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A new study partly-sponsored by Nasa’s Goddard Space Flight Center has highlighted the prospect that global industrial civilisation could collapse in coming decades due to unsustainable resource exploitation and increasingly unequal wealth distribution.
Noting that warnings of ‘collapse’ are often seen to be fringe or controversial, the study attempts to make sense of compelling historical data showing that “the process of rise-and-collapse is actually a recurrent cycle found throughout history.” Cases of severe civilisational disruption due to “precipitous collapse – often lasting centuries – have been quite common.”

“The fall of the Roman Empire, and the equally (if not more) advanced Han, Mauryan, and Gupta Empires, as well as so many advanced Mesopotamian Empires, are all testimony to the fact that advanced, sophisticated, complex, and creative civilizations can be both fragile and impermanent.”

… accumulated surplus is not evenly distributed throughout society, but rather has been controlled by an elite. The mass of the population, while producing the wealth, is only allocated a small portion of it by elites, usually at or just above subsistence levels.”

The study challenges those who argue that technology will resolve these challenges by increasing efficiency:
“Technological change can raise the efficiency of resource use, but it also tends to raise both per capita resource consumption and the scale of resource extraction, so that, absent policy effects, the increases in consumption often compensate for the increased efficiency of resource use.”

Can a collapse of global civilization be avoided?

Throughout our history environmental problems have contributed to collapses of civilizations. A new paper published yesterday in Proceedings of the Royal Society B addresses the likelihood that we are facing a global collapse now. The paper concludes that global society can avoid this and recommends that social and natural scientists collaborate on research to develop ways to stimulate a significant increase in popular support for decisive and immediate action on our predicament.

Paul and Anne Ehrlich’s paper provides a comprehensive description of the damaging effects of escalating climate disruption, overpopulation, overconsumption, pole-to-pole distribution of dangerous toxic chemicals, poor technology choices, depletion of resources including water, soils, and biodiversity essential to food production, and other problems currently threatening global environment and society. The problems are not separate, but are complex, interact, and feed on each other.
The authors say serious environmental problems can only be solved and a collapse avoided with unprecedented levels of international cooperation through multiple civil and political organizations. They conclude that if that does not happen, nature will restructure civilization for us.

Society will collapse by 2040 due to catastrophic food shortages, says study

‘The results show that based on plausible climate trends and a total failure to change course, the global food supply system would face catastrophic losses, and an unprecedented epidemic of food riots’

A scientific model has suggested that society will collapse in less than three decades due to catastrophic food shortages if policies do not change.
The model, developed by a team at Anglia Ruskin University’s Global Sustainability Institute, does not account for society reacting to escalating crises by changing global behaviour and policies.

However the model does show that our current way of life appears to be unsustainable and could have dramatic worldwide consequences.

Dr Aled Jones :D, the Director of the Global Sustainability Institute, told Insurge Intelligence: “We ran the model forward to the year 2040, along a business-as-usual trajectory based on ‘do-nothing’ trends — that is, without any feedback loops that would change the underlying trend.

“The results show that based on plausible climate trends, and a total failure to change course, the global food supply system would face catastrophic losses, and an unprecedented epidemic of food riots.
“In this scenario, global society essentially collapses as food production falls permanently short of consumption.”

Apocalypse Soon: Has Civilization Passed the Environmental Point of No Return?

Although there is an urban legend that the world will end this year based on a misinterpretation of the Mayan calendar, some researchers think a 40-year-old computer program that predicts a collapse of socioeconomic order and massive drop in human population in this century may be on target

Remember how Wile E. Coyote, in his obsessive pursuit of the Road Runner, would fall off a cliff? The hapless predator ran straight out off the edge, stopped in midair as only an animated character could, looked beneath him in an eye-popping moment of truth, and plummeted straight down into a puff of dust. Splat! Four decades ago, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology computer model called World3 warned of such a possible course for human civilization in the 21st century. In Limits to Growth, a bitterly disputed 1972 book that explicated these findings, researchers argued that the global industrial system has so much inertia that it cannot readily correct course in response to signals of planetary stress. But unless economic growth skidded to a halt before reaching the edge, they warned, society was headed for overshoot—and a splat that could kill billions.
Don’t look now but we are running in midair, a new book asserts. In 2052: A Global Forecast for the Next Forty Years (Chelsea Green Publishing), Jorgen Randers of the BI Norwegian Business School in Oslo, and one of the original World3 modelers, argues that the second half of the 21st century will bring us near apocalypse in the form of severe global warming. Dennis Meadows, professor emeritus of systems policy at the University of New Hampshire who headed the original M.I.T. team and revisited World3 in 1994 and 2004, has an even darker view. The 1970s program had yielded a variety of scenarios, in some of which humanity manages to control production and population to live within planetary limits (described as Limits to Growth). Meadows contends that the model’s sustainable pathways are no longer within reach because humanity has failed to act accordingly.
Instead, the latest global data are tracking one of the most alarming scenarios, in which these variables increase steadily to reach a peak and then suddenly drop in a process called collapse. In fact, “I see collapse happening already,” he says. “Food per capita is going down, energy is becoming more scarce, groundwater is being depleted.” Most worrisome, Randers notes, greenhouse gases are being emitted twice as fast as oceans and forests can absorb them. Whereas in 1972 humans were using 85 percent of the regenerative capacity of the biosphere to support economic activities such as growing food, producing goods and assimilating pollutants, the figure is now at 150 percent—and growing.

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Randers’s ideas most closely resemble a World3 scenario in which energy efficiency and renewable energy stave off the worst effects of climate change until after 2050. For the coming few decades, Randers predicts, life on Earth will carry on more or less as before. Wealthy economies will continue to grow, albeit more slowly as investment will need to be diverted to deal with resource constraints and environmental problems, which thereby will leave less capital for creating goods for consumption. Food production will improve: increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere will cause plants to grow faster, and warming will open up new areas such as Siberia to cultivation. Population will increase, albeit slowly, to a maximum of about eight billion near 2040. Eventually, however, floods and desertification will start reducing farmland and therefore the availability of grain. Despite humanity’s efforts to ameliorate climate change, Randers predicts that its effects will become devastating sometime after mid-century, when global warming will reinforce itself by, for instance, igniting fires that turn forests into net emitters rather than absorbers of carbon. “Very likely, we will have war long before we get there,” Randers adds grimly. He expects that mass migration from lands rendered unlivable will lead to localized armed conflicts.
Graham Turner of Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization fears that collapse could come even earlier, but due to peak oil rather than climate change. After comparing the various scenarios generated by World3 against recent data on population, industrial output and other variables, Turner and, separately, the PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, conclude that the global system is closely following a business-as-usual output curve. In this model run the economy continues to grow as expected until about 2015, but then falters because nonrenewable resources such as oil become ever more expensive to extract. “Not that we’re running out of any of these resources,” Turner explains. “It’s that as you try to get to unconventional sources such as under deep oceans, it takes a lot more energy to extract each unit of energy.” To keep up oil supply, the model predicts that society will divert investment from agriculture, causing a drop in food production. In this scenario, population peaks around 2030 at between seven and eight billion and then decreases sharply, evening out at about four billion in 2100.

End of days: Is Western civilisation on the brink of collapse?

History tells us all cultures have their sell-by date. Do political strife, crippling inequality and climate change mean the West’s time is now up
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By Laura Spinney
AH, the good old days, when predictions that “the end is nigh” were seen only on sandwich boards, and the doom-mongers who carried them were easy enough to ignore.
If only things had stayed so simple. The sandwich boards have mostly gone and the world is still here, but the gloomy predictions keep coming, and not all of them are based on creative interpretations of religious texts. Scientists, historians and politicians alike have begun to warn that Western culture is reaching a critical juncture. Cycles of inequality and resource use are heading for a tipping point that in many past civilisations precipitated political unrest, war and finally collapse.
For the most part, though, people are carrying on as usual, shopping for their next holiday or posing on social media. In fact, many people seem blissfully unaware that collapse might be imminent. Are Westerners doing the modern equivalent of sitting around eating grapes while the barbarians hammer on the doors? And more importantly, does science have any ideas about what is really going on, what might happen next and how people could turn things around?

The idea that Western power and influence is in gradual decline, perhaps as a prelude to a precipitous fall, has been around for a while. But it has gained a new urgency with recent political events, not least the election of US president Donald Trump. For some, his turning away from international commitments is part of fulfilling his promise to “make America great again” by concentrating on its own interests. For others, it’s a dangerous move that threatens to undermine the whole world order. Meanwhile, over in the old world, Europe is mired in its own problems.
Using science to predict the future isn’t easy, not least because both “collapse” and “Western civilisation” are difficult to define. We talk about the collapse of the Roman Empire in the middle of the first millennium, for example, but there is plenty of evidence that the empire existed in some form for centuries afterwards and that its influence lingers today. The end of Ancient Egypt was more of a change in the balance of power than a catastrophic event in which everyone died. So, when we talk about collapse, do we mean that people lose everything and go back to the dark ages? Or that it’s going to be socially and politically turbulent for a while?
Western civilisation is a similarly slippery concept. Roughly speaking, it covers parts of the world where the dominant cultural norms originated in Western Europe, including North America, Australia and New Zealand. Beyond that, though, the lines get blurrier. Other civilisations, such as China, were built on different sets of cultural norms, yet thanks to globalisation, defining where Western culture starts and ends is far from easy.
Despite these difficulties, some scientists and historians are analysing the rise and fall of ancient civilisations to look for patterns that might give us a heads-up on what is coming.
So is there any evidence that the West is reaching its end game? According to Peter Turchin, an evolutionary anthropologist at the University of Connecticut, there are certainly some worrying signs. Turchin was a population biologist studying boom-and-bust cycles in predator and prey animals when he realised that the equations he was using could also describe the rise and fall of ancient civilisations.
In the late 1990s, he began to apply these equations to historical data, looking for patterns that link social factors such as wealth and health inequality to political instability. Sure enough, in past civilisations in Ancient Egypt, China and Russia, he spotted two recurring cycles that are linked to regular era-defining periods of unrest.
“You’ve got to be very optimistic to think that this is just a blip on the screen”
One, a “secular cycle”, lasts two or three centuries. It starts with a fairly equal society, then, as the population grows, the supply of labour begins to outstrip demand and so becomes cheap. Wealthy elites form, while the living standards of the workers fall. As the society becomes more unequal, the cycle enters a more destructive phase, in which the misery of the lowest strata and infighting between elites contribute to social turbulence and, eventually, collapse. Then there is a second, shorter cycle, lasting 50 years and made up of two generations – one peaceful and one turbulent.
Looking at US history Turchin spotted peaks of unrest in 1870, 1920 and 1970. Worse, he predicts that the end of the next 50-year cycle, in around 2020, will coincide with the turbulent part of the longer cycle, causing a period of political unrest that is at least on a par with what happened around 1970, at the peak of the civil rights movement and protests against the Vietnam war.
This prediction echoes one made in 1997 by two amateur historians called William Strauss and Neil Howe, in their book The Fourth Turning: An American prophecy. They claimed that in about 2008 the US would enter a period of crisis that would peak in the 2020s – a claim said to have made a powerful impression on US president Donald Trump’s former chief strategist, Steve Bannon.
Turchin made his predictions in 2010, before the election of Donald Trump and the political infighting that surrounded his election, but he has since pointed out that current levels of inequality and political divisions in the US are clear signs that it is entering the downward phase of the cycle. Brexit and the Catalan crisis hint that the US is not the only part of the West to feel the strain.
As for what will happen next, Turchin can’t say. He points out that his model operates at the level of large-scale forces, and can’t predict exactly what might tip unease over into unrest and how bad things might get.
How and why turbulence sometimes turns into collapse is something that concerns Safa Motesharrei, a mathematician at the University of Maryland. He noticed that while, in nature, some prey always survive to keep the cycle going, some societies that collapsed, such as the Maya, the Minoans and the Hittites, never recovered.
Borrowed time
To find out why, he first modelled human populations as if they were predators and natural resources were prey. Then he split the “predators” into two unequal groups, wealthy elites and less well-off commoners.
This showed that either extreme inequality or resource depletion could push a society to collapse, but collapse is irreversible only when the two coincide. “They essentially fuel each other,” says Motesharrei.
Part of the reason is that the “haves” are buffered by their wealth from the effects of resource depletion for longer than the “have-nots” and so resist calls for a change of strategy until it is too late.
This doesn’t bode well for Western societies, which are dangerously unequal. According to a recent analysis, the world’s richest 1 per cent now owns half the wealth, and the gap between the super-rich and everyone else has been growing since the financial crisis of 2008.
The West might already be living on borrowed time. Motesharrei’s group has shown that by rapidly using non-renewable resources such as fossil fuels, a society can grow by an order of magnitude beyond what would have been supported by renewables alone, and so is able to postpone its collapse. “But when the collapse happens,” they concluded, “it is much deeper.”

Joseph Tainter, an anthropologist at Utah State University, and author of The Collapse of Complex Societies, offers a similarly bleak outlook. He sees the worst-case scenario as a rupture in fossil fuel availability, causing food and water supplies to fail and millions to die within a few weeks.
That sounds disastrous. But not everyone agrees that the boom-and-bust model applies to modern society. It might have worked when societies were smaller and more isolated, critics say, but now? Can we really imagine the US dissolving in an internal war that would leave no one standing? There are armies of scientists and engineers working on solutions, and in theory we can avoid past societies’ mistakes. Plus, globalisation makes us robust, right?
This comes back to what we mean by collapse. Motesharrei’s group defines historical societies according to strict geographical limits, so that if some people survived and migrated to find new natural resources they would constitute a new society. By this criterion, even very advanced societies have collapsed irreversibly and the West could too. But it wouldn’t necessarily mean annihilation.
For that reason, many researchers avoid the word collapse, and talk instead about a rapid loss of complexity. When the Roman Empire broke up, new societies emerged, but their hierarchies, cultures and economies were less sophisticated, and people lived shorter, unhealthier lives. That kind of across-the-board loss of complexity is unlikely today, says Turchin, but he doesn’t rule out milder versions of it: the break-up of the European Union, say, or the US losing its empire in the form of NATO and close allies such as South Korea.
On the other hand, some people, such as Yaneer Bar-Yam of the New England Complex Systems Institute in Massachusetts, see this kind of global change as a shift up in complexity, with highly centralised structures such as national governments giving way to less centralised, overarching networks of control. “The world is becoming an integrated whole,” says Bar-Yam.
Some scientists, Bar-Yam included, are even predicting a future where the nation state gives way to fuzzy borders and global networks of interlocking organisations, with our cultural identity split between our immediate locality and global regulatory bodies.
However things pan out, almost nobody thinks the outlook for the West is good. “You’ve got to be very optimistic to think that the West’s current difficulties are just a blip on the screen,” says historian Ian Morris of Stanford University in California, author of Why the West Rules – For Now. So, can we do anything to soften the blow?
Turchin says that by manipulating the forces that fuel the cycles, by, for example, introducing more progressive taxes to address income equality and the exploding public debt, it might be possible to avert disaster. And Motesharrei thinks we should rein in population growth to levels his model indicates are sustainable. These exact levels vary over time, depending on how many resources are left and how sustainably – or otherwise – we use them.
The problem with these kinds of solutions, however, is that humans haven’t proved themselves to be great at playing the long game. New psychology research may help to explain why that is the case.
Cognitive scientists recognise two broad modes of thought – a fast, automatic, relatively inflexible mode, and a slower, more analytical, flexible one. Each has its uses, depending on the context, and their relative frequency in a population has long been assumed to be stable. David Rand, a psychologist at Yale University, though, argues that populations might actually cycle between the two over time.
Say a society has a transportation problem. A small group of individuals thinks analytically and invents the car. The problem is solved, not only for them but for millions of others besides, and because a far larger number of people have been relieved of thinking analytically – at least in this one domain – there is a shift in the population towards automatic thinking.
This happens every time a new technology is invented that renders the environment more hospitable. Once large numbers of people use the technology without foresight, problems start to stack up. Climate change resulting from the excess use of fossil fuels is just one example. Others include overuse of antibiotics leading to microbial resistance, and failing to save for retirement.
Jonathan Cohen, a psychologist at Princeton University who developed the theory with Rand, says it could help solve a long-standing puzzle regarding societies heading for ruin: why did they keep up their self-destructive behaviour even though the more analytical people must have seen the danger ahead? “The train had left the station,” says Cohen, and the forward-thinking folk were not steering it.
“Technological innovation may not be able to bail us out as it has in the past”
This is the first time anyone has attempted to link the evolution of societies with human psychology, and the researchers admit their model is simple, for now. And while Rand and his colleagues make no attempt to guide policy, they do think their model suggests a general direction we might look in for remedies. “Education has got to be part of the answer,” says Cohen, adding that there could be more emphasis on analytical thinking in the classroom.
But Tainter says trying to instil more forethought might be a pipe dream. If behavioural economics has taught us anything, he says, it is that human beings are much more emotional than rational when it comes to decision-making. He thinks a more pressing issue to tackle is the dwindling rate of invention relative to investment in R & D, as the world’s problems become harder to solve. “I foresee a pattern in the future where technological innovation is not going to be able to bail us out as it has in the past,” he says.
So, is the West really on the ropes? Perhaps. But ultimately its survival will depend on the speed at which people can adapt. If we don’t reduce our dependency on fossil fuels, tackle inequality and find a way to stop elites from squabbling among themselves, things will not end well. In Tainter’s view, if the West makes it through, it will be more by luck than by good judgement. “We are a species that muddles through,” he says. “That’s all we’ve ever done, and all we’ll ever do.”
This article appeared in print under the headline “The Fall”

Climate Change, energy, Environment, Global Warming, technology

Energy Transitions 2019 – New Actors, New Technologies, New Business Models -March 18, Chatham House, London (THE CHATHAM HOUSE RULE!), The Rothschild Foundation.

“When a meeting, or part thereof, is held under the Chatham House Rule, participants are free to use the information received, but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the speaker(s), nor that of any other participant, may be revealed.”

£1302.00 … for a one day conference! No wonder these people rule the world!

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Energy Transitions 2019

Leadership in a climate of disruptive change
18 March 2019 – 9:30am 5:30pm
Chatham House, London

Conference
Energy Transitions 2019
New Actors, New Technologies, New Business Models
18 March 2019 – 9:30am to 5:30pm
Chatham House, London

Overview

A global shift in the energy sector is under way with the rise of renewable energy sources spearheaded by their dominance of investment in the power sector. This is leading to disruptive change as the greater deployment of renewables and many associated technologies, such as storage, are challenging existing business models and threatening the market dominance of the existing actors. At the same time investment in fossil fuels has stabilized, as a slowdown of the financing of coal has been balanced by modest increases in spending in upstream oil and gas.

New global trends, electrification of new sectors such as transport and heating, along with the provision of modern energy services to over a billion people lacking access could further disrupt the energy sector, and the future impacts of these transitions on global energy security and sustainable transitions globally remain unclear.

Therefore, now, more than ever, it is critical that policy-makers and business leaders re-evaluate current and future strategies for delivering the domestic and international energy transition. The fourth annual Chatham House Energy Transitions conference will examine the new drivers of change, focusing on how different economies and industries can make the shift to a low-carbon energy future. Key questions to be explored include:

  • What will incentivize an acceleration in decarbonization and drive low-carbon innovation?
  • How can new technologies be deployed to transform grid interaction and enhance connectivity?
  • What are the implications of the changing policy environment for low-carbon investment?
  • How do disruptive shifts in the energy sector affect the prospects for enhancing access to clean, safe and sustainable energy in developing countries?

The Chatham House Rule
To enable as open a debate as possible, this conference will be held under the Chatham House Rule.

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“Have I applied?… maybe!” 😀

The Waddesdon Club: Mainstreaming Climate in Finance and Economic Decision-making

Achieving the Paris Agreement’s goal of limiting temperature increases to ‘well below’ 2°C requires environmental leadership to rapidly emerge within the world’s centres of economic policymaking: treasuries, finance ministries and ministries of economy and business.
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Plenary Session at the Waddesdon Club 2018 annual meeting

The urgency of climate change dictates that the next generation of leaders must deliver the economic transformation needed; these individuals need to understand how climate and environment challenges will affect their time in power and define their legacies.
Our Work

The Waddesdon Club is Chatham House’s response – through engaging future leaders, it seeks to equip them with the necessary tools, concepts, language, and capacities for influence needed to advance a mainstream economic agenda for climate change and sustainable development. Core to this approach is an annual retreat at Waddesdon Manor, offering a unique opportunity for participants to deepen their knowledge; widen their peer network, including meeting leading international experts; and share their respective perceptions, experiences and ideas on climate change issues.~

Previous Waddesdon Club Retreats

The inaugural Waddesdon Club retreat was held in October 2016 with a broad focus on the importance of low-carbon industrial strategies in mobilizing capital for low-carbon investment, driving down technology costs, fostering innovation and phasing out high-emitting activities.

The second Waddesdon Club retreat took place in early 2018, with a discussion on the practical policy challenges of managing the green economy transition. Expert speakers highlighted the role of international institutions in shaping norms, policies and financial flows. Participants addressed the need for a vision that brings together poverty alleviation, tackling inequality and addressing climate change for a just transition amidst rapid decarbonisation.

ROTHSCHILD FOUNDATION
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Chatham House ‘Waddeson Club’ at Windmill Hill

Achieving the Paris Agreement’s goal of limiting temperature increases requires strong environmental leadership within economic policymaking. In October 2016, Chatham House used the unique setting of Windmill Hill to convene future leaders in finance and economy ministries from across the globe. The self styled ‘Waddesdon Club’ aimed to enhance understanding of climate and environmental challenges and ensure consideration within policy making at the highest level.
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Organised by the Energy, Environment and Resources department and the International Economic departments at Chatham House the ‘retreat’ was attended by leading economic policymakers and experts from the fields of climate science, energy and finance. Utilising the inspiration of Windmill Hill, itself a celebration of the conservation and environmental work pursued by the Rothschild Foundation, attendees shared knowledge on the current political and economic context and explored the intersections of environmental and economic policymaking. With the long term aim of supporting economies to respond more effectively to global change, the event identified recommendations for future discussion.

In order to enhance attendees’ experience and support effective communication, a dedicated mobile app was developed for the event. Co-created by Chatham House and digital tool provider, Lumi, the app allowed real-time updates and feedback as well as being an on-going resource which supports the implementation of ideas discussed at the event.
Chatham House plan to continue the momentum built through the first Waddesdon Club with future events at Windmill Hill.

Climate Change, Dark Matter, Futurism, Global Warming, GUT-CP, hydrino, Randell Mills, SunCell, technology

“It’s like there’s some cabal of physicists that wants everybody to be stupid.” – Scientist claims dark matter-powered device can create nearly limitless energy

“It’s like there’s some cabal of physicists that wants everybody to be stupid.” – Dr Randell Mills
“Most people want to be stupid… it’s a form of cowardice” – Danny Hurley

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“The risk for me turning to the dark side… stupid people… I don’t think they should be allowed to breed, to even live on this planet… kind of with the Rockefellers and Rothschilds on that one!”

Scientist claims dark matter-powered device can create nearly limitless energy

New Jersey scientist says his research is a revolution, but it flies in the face of accepted physics.
By Sam Newhouse
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A scientist working in a lab in central New Jersey says he has discovered a nearly limitless source of energy that can solve the world’s energy problems.

There’s just one problem: most scientists think it’s baloney.

But Dr. Randell Mills, inventor of the Suncell, has no doubt that his device could change the world.

“It is the pinnacle of the quest for the ultimate power source,” said Dr. Mills during an interview at Brilliant Light Power’s laboratory. “It’s not a theory. What I did was just to take the natural laws, Newton’s laws from the 1600s and Maxwell’s laws from the 1800s, and use them to solve structurally what the atom is.”

The Suncell is based on Mills’ concept of the hydrino, which arises from his personal Grand Unified Theory of Classical Physics.

Hydrinos are created by compacting the orbital of electrons in the hydrogen atoms found in water, Mills said. This creates the hydrino, a form of dark matter, which releases tremendous light and energy, hotter than the surface of the sun. If captured through technology like solar panels, it could power cars, computers, home heating – everything, he believes.

What do other scientists have to say about it? “La-la land,” said one. “BS,” said another.
None agreed to go on the record discussing hydrinos. But their skepticism relates to the fact that the concept of the hydrino defies most of quantum mechanics and its understanding of subatomic particles.

No problem, Mills said. Quantum mechanics is wrong.

“I’m saying ‘physical laws apply to atoms.’ That’s provable,” he said. “They say the universe is pure math. … It’s like there’s some cabal of physicists that wants everybody to be stupid.”

Mills isn’t completely alone in his quest. Bucknell University professor and engineer Peter Mark Jansson ran experiments on the hydrino in 2010 at Rowan University, partly funded by Mills. He found the process was creating energy.

“There has got to be something in the reaction itself that creates this extremely high energy reaction,” Jansson said. “Dr. Mills and his scientists believe it is the hydrino formation. … They believe they’ve found the greatest discovery in recent history.”
Jansson argued that while Mills’ theories may not be accepted by mainstream science, he doesn’t think most scientists have given them a fair consideration.

“I have heard Nobel laureates say it’s a scam,” Jansson said. “How can you say that if you haven’t done an experiment and tried to prove whether or not these guys are onto something novel?”

For Mills, who has been toiling on his project for more than two decades, it’s just a matter of perfecting the technology. So far, the hydrino has blown up or melted most of the devices he used to create it, he said. But Brilliant Light Power aims to soon be marketing Suncells that can help heat homes.

“Early on, I was subject to a lot of attacks,” he acknowledged. “Now we’re just refining it, and we’ll have a first model of a heater product … We wouldn’t have to pollute as much. That should really accelerate our quality of life.”

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Climate Change, Futurism, Global Warming, GUT-CP, Planet Earth, technology

Who? Rothschild? … well we where suppose to have met twice in the past two months. (I imagine they are taking an interest… yeah)

“Well I invited them (or a representative) to The Shard in August… didn’t happen. They invited me to The Shard just two weeks ago (wine tasting), it was too short notice… … we just keep fleetingly passing each other Rothschild!… it’s meant to be.” 😀
Perhaps I wont see any middle fingers from way up here! (goy)

“For the first time in human history the power of the Sun has been brought down to planet Earth”
“The biggest discovery since fire”

“This overturns EVERYTHING! Fossil fuels, ALL energy industries, medicine, chemistry,space… the global financial system… I imagine a few people in The City are aware of it.”

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Daniel Hurley. Enjoys Chocolate and Champagne (ask you’re cousin), and the ‘things of wealth and taste’… … hope you saved a seat at the table for me gents! 😉

 

Chemistry, Climate Change, Environment, Futurism, GUT-CP, hydrides, hydrino, HydrinoDollars, HydrinoEconomy, Millsian, Molecular modelling, New elements, physics, Randell Mills, SunCell, technology

Hydrino energy & GUT-CP… WHERE’S SILICONE VALLEY ON THIS? (Dr. Mills presentation at Fresno State, 2017)

“You have to understand something about the United Kingdom at this moment in history… it is not the place for great scientific innovation and big ideas! Long gone are the days of Newton. In fact some of us are comparing it to the beginnings of Nazi Germany (this whole mass surveillance, gang stalking thing is unprecedented in history, and no-ones really saying anything about it)… and with Brexit and the possible effects on the countries scientific activities… most of the UK’s best scientists and theoreticians may be best getting out now.”
What would a Brexit mean for the scientific community?

“Anyway… we where talking about California and Silicone Valley! Silicone Valley has for the past thirty years been the centre for this kind of innovative thinking and world changing ideas… Randell Mills is the greatest scientific mind of our age, he has created a future multi-trillion dollar industry, an unlimited number of future industries… it will effect EVERYTHING from energy, to medicine, to computers, to chemical compounds, to transport and aviation… the space industry! WHERE ARE YOU ON THIS ONE CALIFORNIA?
… I’m coming to Silicone Valley in 2019! … and Virginia!”
(I may have to speak to some people at the US Embassy, because last time I tried boarding a flight to California…  there where some slight problems)

silicone valley

Dr. Mills presentation at Fresno State on February 27, 2017.

Brilliant Light Power presented its Roadshow series event at ABM Industries Irvine, California location on February 28th, 2017. In addition, the Company addressed the updated commercial strategy that was expanded to subsidiaries, the latest timeline, and terms for the availability of access to its latest commercial designs and developments.