Uncategorized

BBC airs ‘Windermere children’: How Holocaust survivors went from hell to heaven

‘“The behavior of the children was exceptionally good, all instructions being immediately obeyed,” UK immigration officers recorded in their report.’ 🤨

  • Sala (Anna Maciejewska), Marie (Romola Garai) Sala (Anna Maciejewska), Marie (Romola Garai) (BBC/Wall to Wall/ZDF/  Helen Sloan)Sala (Anna Maciejewska), Marie (Romola Garai) Sala (Anna Maciejewska), Marie (Romola Garai) (BBC/Wall to Wall/ZDF/ Helen Sloan)

HOLOCAUST FILM‘YOU THOUGHT TO YOURSELF: IS THIS REAL LIFE?’

BBC airs ‘Windermere children’: How Holocaust survivors went from hell to heaven

New dramatization portrays how children, brought from camps to tranquil paradise of the Lake District, learned to adjust to being human again

By ROBERT PHILPOT27 Jan 2020, 2:54 am0

LONDON– Tucked into the far north-west corner of the country, the Lake District is one of the most picturesque and secluded parts of England. An idyll of deep glacial lakes, rugged fell mountains and picturesque valleys and villages, it is one of the United Kingdom’s most popular holiday destinations.

In the summer of 1945, however, it was to provide a place of sanctuary, recuperation and rest for children and young people who, just weeks earlier, had experienced and witnessed scenes of unimaginable horror and suffering in the Nazi death camps of Europe.

The story of the 300 Holocaust survivors flown from Prague to the UK in August 1945 is the subject of a BBC dramatization, The Windermere Children, which will be shown this month to mark the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. The program, which is also due to air on Germany’s ZDF, draws on the first-person testimony of some of the real-life survivors.

Get The Times of Israel’s Daily Edition by email and never miss our top stories FREE SIGN UP

One of their number, Jack Aizenberg, a teenager who had survived Buchenwald and a 200-mile death march, described their journey as “like going from hell to paradise” in a 2010 BBC documentary.

Others recalled similar feelings of their arrival in the Lake District. “When we got up in the morning, we saw where we are in Windermere. What a beautiful place,” recounted Minia Jay, who, unlike her parents and five of her six siblings, survived Auschwitz. “The surroundings and the hills and the lovely houses, they looked like they are all painted… After all this horror, after all that we went through to come to this place, we couldn’t believe that such a place exists.”

The children’s journey to Britain had been set in train in June 1945 when the Home Office agreed to a request from philanthropist Leonard Montefiore to grant up to 1,000 displaced children permission to come to the UK. Montefiore was a founder of the Central British Fund for German Jewry (CBF, now World Jewish Relief), which had rescued about 65,000 Jews from Nazi Europe prior to World War II.

On a visit to Europe at the end of the war, Montefiore had hit upon the idea of using RAF planes returning to the UK with empty cargo holds to fly back child survivors. Senior Home Office civil servants recommended the Home Secretary accept the proposal, stating that, they would have “liked to have avoided any scheme for bringing more refugees into Britain, but obviously this proposal with reference to children will receive [a lot] of public sympathy.”

Children in the kitchen at the Calgarth Estate, circa 1946 (Lake District Holocaust Project)

Children in the kitchen at the Calgarth Estate, circa 1946 (Lake District Holocaust Project)

The Home Office’s agreement had come, however, with the condition that the children would be supported by funding from the refugee organizations, and that they would also arrange logistics, such as health screening. An appeal for £1m (£81m in today’s money) was launched by the CBF. “IT IS YOUR DUTY,” adverts suggested, to help make the children “happy and healthy” again.

Thanks to the success of the appeal, 732 children aged between 8-16 year-olds (about 80 of them girls) were eventually brought to the country. Three hundred were designated to travel to the Lake District. The Home Office was, however, warned in advance that the children were unlikely to have any identity papers or proof of age.

The Windermere children fly to a temporary home

The 300 “Windermere children” had mostly been liberated from Theresienstadt in May 1945. Their story has been meticulously researched and documented by the Lake District Holocaust Project, which today hosts a permanent exhibition at the Windermere Library, and acted as advisers for this month’s BBC film. It has also collected invaluable oral testimony from the children, upon which this article extensively draws.

Two months after the British government had given the green light, 10 converted Stirling Bombers of 196 Squadron which were repatriating Czech Air Force personnel departed from the UK for Prague.

On the following day, August 14, 1945, they collected the children from the Czech capital and began their return journey. The children were accompanied on each plane by a small group of adults; numbering 35 in all, they included 11 who were Polish and German and had been brought to look after the youngsters once they arrived in Britain.

Minia Jay remembered the children sitting on the floor of the overcrowded bombers (bad weather heading towards Prague curtailed the original plan to use 22 planes) with many being sick due to the turbulence. To ease the overcrowding on her plane, the pilot brought her and another girl into the cockpit for the flight. During the journey, he handed the girls chocolate – the first time she had tasted it in six years. Although they spoke no English, Jay gathered his meaning as he told them they were flying over Germany.

Calgarth Estate (Lake District Holocaust Project)

At 5pm that afternoon, the first of the planes landed at the RAF base at Crosby-on-Eden in Cumbria (today the Carlisle Lake District Airport), with the final one touching down nearly four hours later. A small welcoming party included Montefiore and the chief executive of the CBF. “The behavior of the children was exceptionally good, all instructions being immediately obeyed,” UK immigration officers recorded in their report.

A fleet of buses and army trucks then set off from the airfield headed towards the Calgarth Estate, about a mile from Lake Windermere at Troutbeck Bridge. It had been constructed during the war to house workers at the nearby Short Sunderland “flying boat” factory, which had been moved there to avoid bombing elsewhere in the country. The village had a canteen, shops, and an entertainment hall.

“I’ll never forget the smell of the fresh linen I slept on that first night,” Ben Helfgott, who was 15 when he arrived, told the BBC 2010 documentary.

“It was the first time I had slept on a bed instead of a bunk for more than three years, and even longer since I had seen clean sheets. I can’t remember ever having a better night’s sleep than I enjoyed that first night in Windermere. It was only a hut I was sleeping in, but to me it was a palace,” said Helfgott.

Other children experienced similar feelings. “I had a little room with a single little bed and a toothbrush and toothpaste, which I had never seen in years,” said Hannah Smith. “I didn’t know what to do with it. You didn’t have luxuries like that… It made such an impression on me. I looked at it and it was so lovely, and a lovely piece of soap and a flannel.”

Sala(Anna Maciejewska), Arek (Tomasz Studzinski), Juliusz (Lukasz Zieba), Ike (Kuba Sprenger), Sam (Marek Wrobelewski), Salek (Jakub Jankiewicz), Ben (Pascal Fischer), Chaim (Kacper Swietek) (BBC/Wall to Wall/ZDF/ Helen Sloan)

Mayer Hersh, who survived internment in a series of camps, including Auschwitz and Buchenwald, explained why their treatment meant so much to the children. “Each one of us got a little room, a little cubicle, with a little cabinet to put some belongings in,” he recalled. “Of course, we had nothing to put into the cabinet because all we had was only what we stood up in. But we felt really great. We had a wonderful clean bed here. White linen. One to each person. We felt we were human beings. We had been treated in the most humane way with dignity.”

Breakfast on the first morning also proved a treat for many of the children. “All the food,” recounted Icek Alterman, “Our eyes were popping out and… because we were not used to being able to get food, we were pinching and grabbing a lot of the stuff, stuffing them down your shirt or your trousers. Like wild animals, you might say.” It was, he remembered “a happy, happy time.”

Mayer Hersh also remembered how the children reacted to plentiful food after suffering years of hunger and privation. In the dining hall, he said, those quick enough stuffed their pockets with buttered bread that had been put out on the tables. “The people in charge of us took us into the kitchen and showed us how many stacks of loaves of bread they had got and [explained that] more is arriving tomorrow.” The children were told: “There’s no need for that.” “We soon learned,” he argued.

Life in paradise

The adjustment – from the brutality of the camps to the tranquillity of the Lake District – naturally took time. “It was completely a new world,” said  Harry Spiro. “You thought to yourself: is this real life? It took a long time to accept that life is not what you were forced to do and what people can do – what people did do — to each other, and all of a sudden you see people around you, caring for you, accepting you for what you are. It was completely different.”

Berek Obuchowski put it more simply. “They looked after us so wonderfully well. The people were angels.”

Simon Block, the screenwriter of “The Windermere Children,” has noted  just how challenging the task facing those caring for the children must have been. “As no children in history had been through what these children had been through, there was no precedent to draw upon for those men and women,” he wrote. “No textbooks. No research papers. They must have operated almost entirely in the dark.”

The children spent most of their time regaining their strength and health. They were encouraged to play football and volleyball, hike, and swim in, or boat on, the lakes.

Children at the school on the Calgarth Estate circa 1946 (Lake District Holocaust Project)

“I went swimming in the cold water,” Helfgott, who would later represent Britain in the 1956 and 1960 Olympics as a multiple-medal winning weightlifter, remembered. “We were there from August to December and I’ll never forget the glory of the autumn leaves.”

Dr. Oscar Friedmann, a psychologist and a Jewish refugee from Germany, was placed in charge of the children’s care. His philosophy was a simple one: to aid their rehabilitation and bring them back into civilized society, the children should be given the maximum amount of freedom possible. Only rules that could be simply explained to the children should be imposed upon them.

To aid their rehabilitation and bring them back into civilized society, the children should be given the maximum amount of freedom

It wasn’t all play, however – the children were also taught basic English, although Maureen Livingston, a nursery nurse who helped looked after the children remembered that they had “no language, they spoke a few words of Russian, a few words of German, an odd Polish word and that was their language.”

The horrors they had experienced bound them together, though. They were, Livingston said, “like a group, they thought as a group, they acted as a group.”

The children’s arrival was not without incident. Some only had their underwear initially while waiting for delayed, correct-fitting clothing to arrive, as one local resident discovered when she encountered the boys for the first time.

“I was walking home from school and I saw big white strip coming towards me on the street. I didn’t know what on earth it was,” Jennifer Jewell told Lancashire Life magazine.

“As it got closer I realized it was a long line of boys. They had arrived from Poland but their new clothes hadn’t. They didn’t let that stop them though so they were walking through the streets in their white vests and underwear.”

She went on: “There were lovely boys. Part of the lake was once cordoned off to make a swimming pool and the boys would often be down there. They were all so delighted and grateful to have been brought here. It was hard to believe the atrocities they had seen and lived through. They said coming to Windermere was like being in paradise.”

Children in the local cinema circa 1946 (Lake District Holocaust Project)

There were occasional hitches, such as the youngsters being unaware that, unlike in the US and Israel, Britons drive on the left-hand side of the road.

“We started to live as normally as we could,” Arek Hersh told the Observer newspaper earlier this month. “Some kids brought us bicycles and they said, ‘Go on, have a ride!’ We didn’t understand what they were saying, but they gave us a bicycle. So we went on the main road, and we were cycling on the right-hand side, so they tooted the horn like mad, shouting from the cars. We didn’t know what they were shouting at us. We couldn’t speak one word of English! But we caught on quite quickly, and we went to the cinemas, sixpence per seat, and it was very nice and we made our own life and things were OK.”

Some of the villagers, however, recalled the children taking local people’s bikes from outside their homes without asking. “They brought it back, though,” said a laughing Velma Smith. “‘I will give you sugar,’ they used to say.”

Spiro said he “never found any resentment” from local people. He also remembered that a lack of proficiency in English didn’t prevent some of the boys meeting local girls. “Nature as it is, body language goes a long way,” he said.

Scars from their time in hell

The joy that the children recounted about arriving in Lake Windermere contrasts with how they appeared to some local people.

“I’d never seen young people that age… who were so solemn, so sad,” a young trainee teacher, Colin Heighton, remembered. “They showed no sign of pleasure in any way.”

“They were in a terrible state. Still wounds on them from where they’d been shot or beaten up” said John Jones. “One just felt very, very sorry for them all.”

Kevin Coulter, a local teenager, was in a hospital near Windermere when Mendel Preter, one of the children brought to Windermere, was also admitted and placed in the adjoining bed.

“I assumed he was about 12-years-old but he was actually about 16, but that’s how he looked,” Coulter remembered. “He was very frail. Even at my young age I could that his eyes were like looking into space – glazed, as if he had no feelings. He was very, very gaunt and frightened, timid.” A rabbi introduced the two teenagers and asked Coulter to look after Preter, passing him a phrase book that enabled the pair to communicate.

Dr. Oscar Friedmann (played by Thomas Kretschmann) in the Windermere Children (BBC/Wall to Wall/ZDF/Helen Sloan)

Physical illness were easier to treat than the deep psychological scars the Nazis had inflicted on the children. All-too-rarely did the arrival of the post after breakfast bring news of the survival of lost relatives.

Nonetheless, Harry Spiro believed that it was “good that we were all together… I think looking back if we had been broken down in small groups right away, maybe we wouldn’t have come through it as well-adjusted as we were.”

The children’s spell in the Lake District inevitably had to come to an end and by early 1946 all had departed for hostels and new homes throughout the UK.

The BBC dramatization, however, reflects continuing interest in the story. Last summer, a National Lottery Heritage Fund award allowed an archaeological dig and survey to take place on the site of the former Calgarth Estate, which had been demolished by the mid-1960s. The BBC’s “Digging for Britain” program featured a story about the dig last month.

But as screenwriter Block has made clear, the story is not just about history. Instead, he argues, the events of 75 years ago have parallels with today’s migrant crisis in general, and the treatment of child refugees in particular.

That point was also made by one of the survivors’ best-known descendants. In 2018, Robert Rinder – the host of a popular daytime courtroom TV series which is Britain’s answer to “Judge Judy” – appeared in an episode of the BBC’s “Who Do You Think You Are?” In the genealogy program, he travelled to Windermere to see where his grandfather, Morris Malenicky, one of the 300 children, had arrived in Britain.

Sala (Anna Maciejewska), Marie (Romola Garai) Sala (Anna Maciejewska), Marie (Romola Garai) (BBC/Wall to Wall/ZDF/ Helen Sloan)

“These boys and young men arrived at Windermere and had enormously productive families infused with this brimming love of England,” he suggested when the show was broadcast.

“It’s not surprising – imagine the Lake District being your first view of England, and to be welcomed so warmly by this rural community. We all came to benefit from that.”

Uncategorized

Everything you need to know about Al Wasl Plaza: the heart of Expo 2020 Dubai

😃

Expo 2020

Everything you need to know about Al Wasl Plaza: the heart of Expo 2020 Dubai

The world’s first look at expo, the 360-degree dome will be the main staging area for the opening ceremony on October 20

Ramola Talwar Badam

Ramola Talwar Badam

January 31, 2020

Driving up to the sprawling Expo 2020 site, it is impossible not to notice Al Wasl Plaza.

The expansive dome is one of the most easily identified structure at the Dubai South site.

Described as the ‘crown jewel’ and ‘beating heart’ of Expo 2020, its construction is one that engineers and staff are the most proud of.

Meaning ‘connection’ in English, Al Wasl is also the historical name for Dubai. The steel trellis is the centrepiece of the site, where all roads meet, and reflects the world fair’s aim to bring people together.

It connects the three main zones of Opportunity, Mobility and Sustainability — the central themes of the expo.

Thousands of visitors will congregate at the plaza, which is near the striking falcon-wing inspired UAE pavilion, Dubai Metro and the seven entrances and exits to the world fair.

The world’s first look at expo, the 360-degree dome will be the main staging area for the opening ceremony on October 20. It will also host performances, concerts and events throughout during the six-month expo before staging the closing ceremony.

Striking images, films and dazzling lights will be beamed on to the translucent dome via more than 200 projectors that have been fitted within it.

It will be the world’s largest projection surface when it comes to life in seven months, promising immersive experiences.

The images that will be beamed on the intricate trellis will be visible both inside and outside the structure.

READ MORE

Construction of Expo 2020 Dubai’s ‘crown jewel’ complete

UAE leaders launch Al Wasl Plaza — the ‘beating heart’ of Expo 2020 Dubai

Al Wasl Plaza’s trellis design was inspired by an ancient golden ring found in the Saruq Al Hadid site by Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid, Vice President and Ruler of Dubai. It also reflects the intertwined logo of the Expo 2020.

The moulded steel dome is 130-metre wide, 67-metre tall and weighs more than 500 tonnes.

It required expert engineers with precision heavy lifting equipment to raise it and fit it perfectly into place last year.

Taller than the leaning tower of Pisa and one of the largest single structures on the site, Al Wasl will be a permanent installation that will remain after the world fair ends in April 2021.

The plaza was officially inaugurated on Wednesday by Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed, the Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme Commander of the UAE Armed Forces and Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid, the Vice President and Ruler of Dubai.

The dome’s unique structure was designed by US firm Adrian Smith and Gordon Gill Architecture.

Its location, at the heart of the 4.38 sq km site, will make for dramatic photographs for the millions of visitors from across the world.

Fountains, parks and restaurants have also been planned across the plaza area.

Al Wasl Plaza, an open space at the center of Expo 2020 Dubai, combines breathtaking design, innovative technology, and an intricate domed trellis incorporating a huge immersive projection experience. The plaza at the center of the 4.38-square kilometer site will make a dramatic impression on the millions of people visiting Expo 2020 Dubai from around the world.

The 150 meter diameter Al Wasl Plaza is being designed as a central hub for the exposition. The space will bring people of all backgrounds together to “Connect Minds,” a key ambition of the first World Expo to be held in the Middle East, Africa, and South Asia (MEASA) region. Al Wasl is the historical name for Dubai but also means “connection” in Arabic, reflecting both Dubai’s goal of bringing people together at the Expo and the plaza’s physical location at the heart of the site.

The plaza will connect the three thematic districts – Opportunity, Sustainability and Mobility – as well as the other main concourses, including the Dubai Metro link and the UAE Pavilion, through its seven entrances and exits.

The plaza will be topped by a 65-meter-high domed trellis that was inspired by the shape of the Expo 2020 Dubai logo and will act as an immersive 360-degree projection surface. As the dome is translucent, the projection will be visible to both those inside and out of the covered plaza. Numerous other features in the plaza include restaurants, fountains, and parks.

The comfort of visitors to Expo 2020 Dubai has been factored into the design of the plaza. The design uses techniques to calibrate the temperature under the trellis with that outside, ensuring a comfortable environment.

After the Expo completes in 2021, the plaza will continue to play a central role – literally and metaphorically – in its legacy. There are plans to convert the surrounding 10-13 story buildings into hotels and other commercial uses, complementing the entire mixed-use legacy of the Expo site.

The location will also further strengthen Dubai’s thriving events scene, having been designed to be adapted to host experiences of all sizes and purposes, whether it be a small, intimate event or a large gathering of up to 10,000 people, such as National Day celebrations.

Expo 2020 Dubai will open its doors on 20 October, 2020 and will end on 10 April, 2021. Work is due to start on Al Wasl Plaza in the coming months and is expected to be completed by the end of 2019.

Uncategorized

Video: UAE leaders inaugurate Al Wasl Plaza at Expo 2020 site… 15 Amazing Structures Originally Built for World's Fairs

“Should make an EXPO video, showing all the structures and architecture, unveiled at World Fairs, from around the globe… … LIKE THE INTRO TO GAME OF THRONES!” 😆

Anyhoo…

Video: UAE leaders inaugurate Al Wasl Plaza at Expo 2020 site

Wam
Last updated on January 30, 2020

(Expo 2020)

His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai, and His Highness Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme Commander of the UAE Armed Forces, inaugurated Al Wasl Plaza, the heart of the Expo 2020 Dubai site, on Wednesday.

Also see: Al Wasl Plaza inaugurated

They said that under the leadership of the President, His Highness Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan, the UAE has consolidated its status as a leader in the global arena. The country is a perfect host for Expo 2020, which will promote optimism and hope and inspire people to work towards achieving positive change and a better future.

“We will celebrate the accomplishments of the last 50 years. Thanks to the efforts of UAE citizens and residents, as well as all those who have contributed to its success and prosperity, Expo 2020 will mark the start of new 50-year phase of leadership and achievements,” Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid said.HH Sheikh Mohammed@HHShkMohd

Today, my brother Mohamed bin Zayed and I launched Al Wasl Plaza at the Expo 2020 Dubai site. The giant dome will be the heart of the Expo site that will bring together 192 countries. 38,000 employees are working round the clock to organize the world’s largest show. We are ready.

Embedded video

3,081Twitter Ads info and privacy1,068 people are talking about this



“We are working to implement our vision as part of our comprehensive development plan, whose key objective is the happiness of people. Our efforts are backed by initiatives and projects aimed at maximising the energy and talent of our people and creating new opportunities for them. We work with all countries and governments keen to promote the prosperity and wellbeing of humanity. In a few months, the world will gather in this place to celebrate the cultures of various nations across the world and humankind’s best innovations. Expo 2020 will offer new hope for creating a better tomorrow both for the region and the world.”

Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed said: “Through Expo 2020, we will show the world how our union was the starting point for our development journey, and how our founding fathers established the robust foundations necessary for sustainable development and progress. We will also have an opportunity to demonstrate how the spirit of collaboration is embedded deep in our national ethos and serves as a means for progress and development. The world will also be able to better understand the achievements we have accomplished in the short period since our nation’s foundation, and will learn about our traditions and heritage, our diversity and our experience of peaceful coexistence.”

Their comments came during their visit to the Expo 2020 Dubai site. Accompanying them on the visit were Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Crown Prince of Dubai and Chairman of the Dubai Executive Council; Sheikh Maktoum bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Deputy Ruler of Dubai; Sheikh Tahnoun bin Mohammed Al Nahyan, Ruler’s Representative in Al Ain Region; Lieutenant-General Sheikh Saif bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Interior; Sheikh Mansour bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Presidential Affairs; and other leaders and officials.

Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid and Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed were briefed about Al Wasl Plaza and the preparations to welcome the 192 participating countries and millions of visitors to Expo. They were also briefed on the various phases of Expo completed in 2019, including major construction projects at the site. – Wam

15 Amazing Structures Originally Built for World’s Fairs

MARISA LASCALAJuly 28, 2013 10:00 AM

Some of the world’s most enduring landmarks (perhaps you’ve heard of the Eiffel Tower?) were originally constructed for a World’s Fair. We look back at 15 of our favorites.

Built by Sir Joseph Paxton for the Great Exhibition in 185, the Crystal Palace marked the greatest span of glass on a building at that time. The building was later destroyed by a fire.
Crystal Palace, LondonBuilt by Sir Joseph Paxton for the Great Exhibition in 1851, the Crystal Palace marked the greatest span of glass on a building at that time. The building was later destroyed by a fire.
One of the most famous landmarks in the world was, at the time of its construction for the 1889 Exposition Universelle, also the tallest building on earth, at 1,063 feet high. Before its opening, plans for the structure were met with scorn. Notable artists, including Guy de Maupassant and Paris Opera architect Charles Garnier even signed a letter in Le Temps that called it a "dizzyingly ridiculous tower dominating Paris." Still, Gustave Eiffel, an engineer by trade, persevered, and on the day of its opening he climbed the 1,710 stairs himself to unfurl the French flag at the summit.
Eiffel Tower, ParisOne of the most famous landmarks in the world was, at the time of its construction for the 1889 Exposition Universelle, also the tallest building on earth, at 1,063 feet high. Before its opening, plans for the structure were met with scorn. Notable artists, including Guy de Maupassant and Paris Opera architect Charles Garnier even signed a letter in Le Temps that called it a “dizzyingly ridiculous tower dominating Paris.” Still, Gustave Eiffel, an engineer by trade, persevered, and on the day of its opening he climbed the 1,710 stairs himself to unfurl the French flag at the summit.Courtesy tour-eiffel.fr
Designed by and named after Czech engineer František Křižík, the electrically illuminated Křižíkova Fountain was the centerpiece of the 1891 General Land Centennial Exhibition held in Prague, which was then part of Austria-Hungary. Today, the Fountain is equal parts attraction and stage. As the backdrop for a 6,000-person amphitheater, it hosts dance performances, classical concerts, and other events.
The Křižíkova Fountain, PragueDesigned by and named after Czech engineer František Křižík, the electrically illuminated Křižíkova Fountain was the centerpiece of the 1891 General Land Centennial Exhibition held in Prague, which was then part of Austria-Hungary. Today, the Fountain is equal parts attraction and stage. As the backdrop for a 6,000-person amphitheater, it hosts dance performances, classical concerts, and other events.Wikimedia Commons/Jan Vilimek
Many cities repurposed their World's Fair buildings into museums, including San Francisco (the Palace of Fine Arts Theatre), Saint Louis (the Saint Louis Art Museum), and Philadelphia (the Please Touch Museum). Chicago's Greek-inspired Palace of Fine Arts, one of the few remaining buildings from the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition, has housed two museums: The Field Museum of Natural History and the Museum of Science and Industry, which has been there since it opened in 1933.
The Palace of Fine Arts, ChicagoMany cities repurposed their World’s Fair buildings into museums, including San Francisco (the Palace of Fine Arts Theatre), Saint Louis (the Saint Louis Art Museum), and Philadelphia (the Please Touch Museum). Chicago’s Greek-inspired Palace of Fine Arts, one of the few remaining buildings from the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition, has housed two museums: The Field Museum of Natural History and the Museum of Science and Industry, which has been there since it opened in 1933.Courtesy Chicago History Museum
More than 3,000 water jets and 4,000 lights create a practically infinite number of displays in the Magic Fountain of Montjuïc. Architect Carles Buïgas, who'd previously worked with illuminated fountains, came up with the idea to add dancing water to the colorful display; more than 3,000 workers were commissioned to the creation before the opening of the Great Universal Exhibition in 1929. In the ’80s, music was added to the show, which you can still watch on Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday nights in the summer, and Friday and Saturday nights from October to April.
The Magic Fountain of Montjuïc, BarcelonaMore than 3,000 water jets and 4,000 lights create a practically infinite number of displays in the Magic Fountain of Montjuïc. Architect Carles Buïgas, who’d previously worked with illuminated fountains, came up with the idea to add dancing water to the colorful display; more than 3,000 workers were commissioned to the creation before the opening of the Great Universal Exhibition in 1929. In the ’80s, music was added to the show, which you can still watch on Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday nights in the summer, and Friday and Saturday nights from October to April.Copyright: Ajuntament de Barcelona – Hàbitat Urbà
Treasure Island, sitting underneath the Bay Bridge, was built to celebrate the opening of the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate Bridge, which coincided with the 1939 World Fair.
Golden Gate Bridge, San FransiscoTreasure Island, sitting underneath the Bay Bridge, was built to celebrate the opening of the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate Bridge, which coincided with the 1939 World Fair.Courtesy Golden Gate Bridge, Highway and Transportation District
Inspired by the dawn of the Atomic Age, engineer André Waterkeyn designed a structure for Expo ’58 based on an iron molecule enlarged 165 billion times: the Atomium. Each of the nine interconnected spheres is about 60 feet in diameter, and the highest rises to more than 300 feet. Today, the Atomium still houses an exhibition dedicated to the expo, in addition to other rotating installations and a restaurant with panoramic views on the eighth level.
The Atomium, BrusselsInspired by the dawn of the Atomic Age, engineer André Waterkeyn designed a structure for Expo ’58 based on an iron molecule enlarged 165 billion times: the Atomium. Each of the nine interconnected spheres is about 60 feet in diameter, and the highest rises to more than 300 feet. Today, the Atomium still houses an exhibition dedicated to the expo, in addition to other rotating installations and a restaurant with panoramic views on the eighth level.© www.atomium.be – SABAM 2012
The blueprints for the 605-foot-tall Space Needle were so precisely planned that, when it opened, the rotating restaurant could revolve using only a one-horsepower motor. Since the 1962 World’s Fair, the technology has been refined so that the SkyCity restaurant needs only a 1 ½-horsepower motor to turn in a circle. The tower also boasts an observation deck and events space, with shops down below.
The Space Needle, SeattleThe blueprints for the 605-foot-tall Space Needle were so precisely planned that, when it opened, the rotating restaurant could revolve using only a one-horsepower motor. Since the 1962 World’s Fair, the technology has been refined so that the SkyCity restaurant needs only a 1 ½-horsepower motor to turn in a circle. The tower also boasts an observation deck and events space, with shops down below.Courtesy Seattle Center
Flushing Meadows–Corona Park in New York City has hosted two World’s Fairs: one in 1939 and one in 1964. And those fairs boasted many impressive landmarks, including the 610-foot-tall Trylon spire and the “UFOs” of the New York State Pavilion. But the Unisphere is one of the most well-known—and longest-lasting. Designed by landscape architect Gilmore D. Clarke, the steel sphere was, at the time, the largest globe ever constructed, rising 140 feet and weighing 900,000 pounds (including its base). Today, it’s still an icon of the city; try spotting it from your plane when landing at LaGuardia.
The Unisphere, New York CityFlushing Meadows–Corona Park in New York City has hosted two World’s Fairs: one in 1939 and one in 1964. And those fairs boasted many impressive landmarks, including the 610-foot-tall Trylon spire and the “UFOs” of the New York State Pavilion. But the Unisphere is one of the most well-known—and longest-lasting. Designed by landscape architect Gilmore D. Clarke, the steel sphere was, at the time, the largest globe ever constructed, rising 140 feet and weighing 900,000 pounds (including its base). Today, it’s still an icon of the city; try spotting it from your plane when landing at LaGuardia.Unisphere, 1964. Collection Queens Museum of Art; courtesy Fred Tannery
Built by R. Buckminster Fuller for the 1967 World Fair, the Biosphere is located at Parc Jean-Drapeau, on Saint Helen's Island. Since 2007, the building has been an environmental museum, focusing on water, climate change, and sustainability.
Biosphere, MontrealBuilt by R. Buckminster Fuller for the 1967 World Fair, the Biosphere is located at Parc Jean-Drapeau, on Saint Helen’s Island. Since 2007, the building has been an environmental museum, focusing on water, climate change, and sustainability.
Like a giant disco ball in the sky, the 266-foot-tall Sunsphere beckoned visitors to the World's Fair in 1982. It was constructed out of 360 panes of glass (about 14,000 square feet of glass overall—much less than London’s Crystal Palace a century earlier) and laminated with a gold-dust-filled vinyl, which gave the sphere its color. Today, the Sunsphere is a place for one of the cheapest dates in Knoxville—there's no charge to take the elevator to the observation deck. And, if the date goes well, the Sunsphere can also be rented out as a location for weddings.
The Sunsphere, KnoxvilleLike a giant disco ball in the sky, the 266-foot-tall Sunsphere beckoned visitors to the World’s Fair in 1982. It was constructed out of 360 panes of glass (about 14,000 square feet of glass overall—much less than London’s Crystal Palace a century earlier) and laminated with a gold-dust-filled vinyl, which gave the sphere its color. Today, the Sunsphere is a place for one of the cheapest dates in Knoxville—there’s no charge to take the elevator to the observation deck. And, if the date goes well, the Sunsphere can also be rented out as a location for weddings.Courtesy Knoxville.org
Looking like a cross between a sailboat and the Sydney Opera House, Canada Place serves many purposes. Not only was it the home of the Canada Pavilion during the Expo '86, it’s also now a convention center, a hotel, an office building, a cruise-ship terminal, a retail center, and a promenade (and its "sails" light up at night). Last year, the site hosted a festival for Canada Day that featured 30 bands on three stages.
Canada Place, VancouverLooking like a cross between a sailboat and the Sydney Opera House, Canada Place serves many purposes. Not only was it the home of the Canada Pavilion during the Expo ’86, it’s also now a convention center, a hotel, an office building, a cruise-ship terminal, a retail center, and a promenade (and its “sails” light up at night). Last year, the site hosted a festival for Canada Day that featured 30 bands on three stages.Courtesy Canada Place
Standing more than 300 feet tall, South Korea's Hanbit Tower was designed to recall Cheomseongdae, an ancient Korean astronomical observatory, though what surrounds it is decidedly more modern. The site of the fair still operates as the Expo Science Park, which houses an IMAX dome theater, simulation rides, and a an electric energy pavilion. The observation deck in the Hanbit Tower gives a bird's-eye-view of all the park's attractions.
Hanbit-Tap (Tower of Grand Light), South KoreaStanding more than 300 feet tall, South Korea’s Hanbit Tower was designed to recall Cheomseongdae, an ancient Korean astronomical observatory, though what surrounds it is decidedly more modern. The site of the fair still operates as the Expo Science Park, which houses an IMAX dome theater, simulation rides, and a an electric energy pavilion. The observation deck in the Hanbit Tower gives a bird’s-eye-view of all the park’s attractions.Courtesy of KTO NY
Located right on the prime meridian and in the home of Greenwich Mean Time, London's Millennium Dome fittingly resembles a clock, with 12 yellow masts sticking up out of a gleaming white "face". (Project director Mike Davies was into astronomy, so the number 12 also references the months of the year and constellations in the zodiac.) Architects at the Richard Rogers Partnership took a beating in the press when it opened as part of the nationwide Millennium Festival, partially because of political posturing surrounding the project, but residents today still visit the Millennium Dome—rebranded the O2 Arena—to see concerts. It also hosted basketball and gymnastic events during the 2012 Olympic & Paralympic Games.
The Millennium Dome, LondonLocated right on the prime meridian and in the home of Greenwich Mean Time, London’s Millennium Dome fittingly resembles a clock, with 12 yellow masts sticking up out of a gleaming white “face”. (Project director Mike Davies was into astronomy, so the number 12 also references the months of the year and constellations in the zodiac.) Architects at the Richard Rogers Partnership took a beating in the press when it opened as part of the nationwide Millennium Festival, partially because of political posturing surrounding the project, but residents today still visit the Millennium Dome—rebranded the O2 Arena—to see concerts. It also hosted basketball and gymnastic events during the 2012 Olympic & Paralympic Games.Sergio Pitamitz/CORBIS
Like other World's Fair structures, the iconic China pavilion of the 2010 Expo has taken on a second life as an art museum—a really, really big one. The China Art Palace has more than 160,000 square meters of exhibition space covering five floors. One of the Expo highlights, "Along the River During Qingming Festival," a digitally animated rendering of an ancient scroll, is still on exhibit within.
The China Art Palace, ShanghaiLike other World’s Fair structures, the iconic China pavilion of the 2010 Expo has taken on a second life as an art museum—a really, really big one. The China Art Palace has more than 160,000 square meters of exhibition space covering five floors. One of the Expo highlights, “Along the River During Qingming Festival,” a digitally animated rendering of an ancient scroll, is still on exhibit within.
Uncategorized

Coronavirus may have originated in lab linked to China's biowarfare program

“The Chinese developed ‘SARS and ‘MERS’ 😷… The Israelis developed ‘MEHS’… 🤷 (not so contagious, early symptoms include not giving a fuck)

5′ Hospital staff wash the emergency entrance of Wuhan Medical Treatment Center, where some infected with a new virus are being treated, in Wuhan, China, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020. The number of cases of a new coronavirus from Wuhan has risen … more >

Coronavirus may have originated in lab linked to China’s biowarfare program

By Bill Gertz– The Washington Times – Sunday, January 26, 2020

The deadly animal-borne coronavirus spreading globally may have originated in a laboratory in the city of Wuhan linked to China’s covert biological weapons program, said an Israeli biological warfare analyst.

Radio Free Asia last week rebroadcast a Wuhan television report from 2015 showing China’s most advanced virus research laboratory, known the Wuhan Institute of Virology. The laboratory is the only declared site in China capable of working with deadly viruses.  TOP ARTICLES4/5Alan Dershowitz says Trumpera more divisive than McCarthyism

Dany Shoham, a former Israeli military intelligence officer who has studied Chinese biological warfare, said the institute is linked to Beijing’s covert bio-weapons program.

“Certain laboratories in the institute have probably been engaged, in terms of research and development, in Chinese [biological weapons], at least collaterally, yet not as a principal facility of the Chinese BW alignment,” Mr. Shoham told The Washington Times.

Work on biological weapons is conducted as part of dual civilian-military research and is “definitely covert,” he said in an email.

Mr. Shoham holds a doctorate in medical microbiology. From 1970 to 1991, he was a senior analyst with Israeli military intelligence for biological and chemical warfare in the Middle East and worldwide. He held the rank of lieutenant colonel.

China has denied having any offensive biological weapons, but a State Department report last year revealed suspicions of covert biological warfare work.

A Chinese Embassy spokesman did not return an email seeking comment.

Chinese authorities said they do not know the origin of the coronavirus, which has killed at least 80 and infected thousands.

Gao Fu, director of the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, told state-controlled media that initial signs indicated the virus originated from wild animals sold at a seafood market in Wuhan.

Uncategorized

'I look forward to Britain's Israel embassy moving to Jerusalem,'… UK's premier Boris Johnson supports Trump's M.East deal

“Something important is going to happen at the end of the week.” 😎

‘I look forward to Britain’s Israel embassy moving to Jerusalem,’ says Minister Robert Jenrick

He tells Conservative Friends of Israel reception: ‘We have a patch of land in Jerusalem that has been waiting for our embassy for some time’

Robert Jenrick addresses the event
Robert Jenrick addresses the event (Photo: The JC)

Communities Secretary Robert Jenrick has joked that he would “look forward to the day” when Britain’s embassy in Israel will be “moved to Jerusalem” in a speech at a Westminster event.

Speaking at the Conservative Friends Of Israel parliamentary reception, the government minister added he was told by an ambassador when in the Jewish state that “we have a patch of land in Jerusalem that has been waiting for our embassy for some time.”

Britain has so far not indicated it will move its embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, as the US did in 2018.

To loud applause at the packed gathering on Tuesday, Mr Jenrick added: “As Housing Secretary I don’t like land-banking. I want us to build that embassy.”

Taking a more serious tone, Mr Jenrick said that “defeating Jeremy Corbyn” at last month’s election was “not the celing – that’s the floor.”

He told the gathering, which included Tory Party chairman James Cleverly, MPs Andrew Percy, Robert Halfon and host for the evening Bob Blackman, “It is not just Jeremy Corbyn who is antisemitic – many of those people continue.”

Mr Jenrick singled out Labour leadership contender Sir Keir Starmer, accusing him of hypocrisy for now attempting to distance himself from the Labour leader despite having been “perfectly willing to take a ministerial car and serve in the cabinet of Jeremy Corbyn.”

He added:”We will not forget the conduct of those people who now aspire to lead the Labour Party – and the Jewish community won’t either.”

Mr Jenrick also called Israel an “incredible achievement” and praised the “sheer resilience” of the Jewish people.

He also vowed to ensure the building of the Holocaust Memorial and Learning Centre next to Parliament and revealed he had met with Yad Vashem curators over the project while in Israel last week.

In a further barnstorming speech, Chancellor Sajid Javid declared the government’s “unwavering support” for Israel and said “every minister thinks carefully about what they can do to strengthen that relationship.”

Sajid Javid addresses the event
Sajid Javid addresses the event (Photo: The JC)

Mr Javid then said that, when he was Home Secretary, he had told an “official” to “get stuffed” when they refused to back his now successful bid to proscribe the Iranian-backed terror group Hezbollah as a terrorist group.

To loud cheers, he said he repeated the same “get stuffed” message when he was told he should not visit the Western Wall in Jerusalem during a visit to Israel because of “long-standing policy of over two-decades.”

The Chancellor continued: “You know what? I told them to ‘get stuffed’ and I went anyway.”

In a further attack he said he also delivered the same message to Mr Corbyn after he “sent me legal letter after legal letter” for branding him an antisemite on Twitter.

Mark Regev, the Israel’s ambassador in the UK, told the event: “Something important is going to happen at the end of the week.”

He added: “When this happens and Israel and the UK have signed a trade deal we will continue to see trade grow in this new reality.”

Also delivering speeches at the event were Stephen Crabb, CFI’s parliamentary chair and its honorary president Lord Polak.

UK’s premier Boris Johnson supports Trump’s M.East deal

Support to Trump’s so-called deal of century confirmed in UK gov’t statement

Ahmet Gurhan Kartal   |28.01.2020UK's premier Boris Johnson supports Trump's M.East deal

LONDON

The U.K. announced its support Tuesday for U.S. President Donald Trump’s controversial Middle East peace plan

The revelation came during Trump’s press conference at the White House, where he released the so-called ‘deal of the century,’ his oft-delayed plan to end the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. 
“America is prepared to work with all parties on our vision. So many other countries are willing, ready and able to work with us,” Trump said, adding he has spoken to many leaders.

“I cannot believe the amount of support this morning has,” he said.

“I have been called by leaders, Boris [Johnson] called; so many called.

“They’re all saying, ‘whatever we can do to help’,” Trump added.

A statement from the British government also confirmed the phone call between Trump and Johnson.

“The leaders also discussed the United States’ proposal for peace between Israelis and Palestinians, which could prove a positive step forwards,” the statement said, confirming Johnson’s support for the so-called deal.

British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab also released a statement to say they “welcome” the deal.

“This is clearly a serious proposal, reflecting extensive time and effort,” Raab said.

“A peace agreement between Israelis and Palestinians that leads to peaceful coexistence could unlock the potential of the entire region and provide both sides with the opportunity for a brighter future.”

Raab added, however, that “only the leaders of Israel and the Palestinian territories can determine whether these proposals can meet the needs and aspirations of the people they represent.”

“We encourage them to give these plans genuine and fair consideration and explore whether they might prove a first step on the road back to negotiations.”