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Mission studying sun named for MSU grad surprises NASA with 50% more data than expected… NASA’s sun-sailing mission is proving a surprising success: Quest to work out how the star works yields 50 percent more data than initially projected

This data is going to prove us right! The sun is a hydrino producing engine of the Universe… all stars are… producing a lower form of hydrogen (dark matter) causing the accelerating expansion of the Universe.
A CHEMICAL catalyst reaction… it explains so many mysteries of the sun, first being why the corona is hotter than the interior.

Mission studying sun named for MSU grad surprises NASA with 50% more data than expected

By Benjamin Raven | braven@mlive.com

Officials working on NASA’s Parker Solar Probe mission to study the sun in unprecedented detail say they received double the data they expected from its first two solar encounters.

The Parker Solar Probe is the first NASA spacecraft to be named for a living person, who just happens to be Michigan State University graduate Eugene Parker. The U.S. space agency says it received 22 gigabytes of science data back on May 6, which is 50 percent more than it estimated/expected after the two solar encounters.

“This 22 GB is 50% more data than the team had estimated would be downlinked by this point in the mission — all because the spacecraft’s telecommunications system is performing better than pre-launch estimates,” the John’s Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory reports in a Thursday, Aug. 1 blog post.

“After characterizing the spacecraft’s operations during the commissioning phase, which began soon after launch, the Parker mission team determined that the telecom system could effectively deliver more downlink opportunities, helping the team maximize the download of science data.”

As #ParkerSolarProbe speeds towards its third solar flyby, experiments here on Earth are helping scientists get a closer look at the physics of the Sun. More from @UWMadison about how researchers are mimicking solar wind in the lab: https://t.co/AYyuoxfWy6 pic.twitter.com/qQRruDW0xf— NASA Sun & Space (@NASASun) July 29, 2019

Related: NASA probe named for MSU grad sets speed, distance records while on path for sun

The Parker Solar Probe launched back in August 2018, and has flown closer — and faster — to the sun than has ever been done. NASA hopes the mission improves our ability to forecast major space-weather events that impact us on Earth.

NASA reported back in April of this year that the probe moved past the sun from 15 million miles away at 213,000 mph. While 15 million miles doesn’t exactly sound like a “close approach,” the space agency points out that this tied the closest approach of the sun by a spacecraft ever (also set by the Parker Solar Probe).

On top of this doubling of the data, the space agency says it expects another 25 GB of downloaded data from the probe between July 24 and Aug. 15.

“All of the expected science data collected through the first and second encounters is now on the ground,” Nickalaus Pinkine, missions operations manager for the Parker Solar Probe, said.

“As we learned more about operating in this environment and these orbits, the team did a great job of increasing data downloads of the information gathered by the spacecraft’s amazing instruments.”

In this image from the Deep Space Network Now site, Parker Solar Probe is shown connecting with a carrier wave to antennas 25 and 55 on Aug. 1, 2019. Parker Solar Probe is identified as SPP by DSN; the mission, formerly Solar Probe Plus, was renamed for solar scientist Eugene Parker in 2017.
In this image from the Deep Space Network Now site, Parker Solar Probe is shown connecting with a carrier wave to antennas 25 and 55 on Aug. 1, 2019. Parker Solar Probe is identified as SPP by DSN; the mission, formerly Solar Probe Plus, was renamed for solar scientist Eugene Parker in 2017.

Next up for the mission is its third solar encounter projected to start Aug. 27, and its third perihelion which is set to start Sept. 1. Perihelion is the point when an object reaches its closest approach to the sun.

The prove will make its second flyby of Venus the day after Christmas, and then its fourth and fifth perihelion on Jan. 29 and June 7, 2020, respectively. As it stands, the mission is scheduled to make its 24th and final close approach to the sun in June 2025.

In these close approaches, the Parker Solar Probe faces “heat and radiation unlike any spacecraft has in history.” To help it face these conditions on its journey, NASA installed a “cutting-edge heat shield” that is made of two panels of superheated carbon-composite sandwiching a 4.5-inch thick carbon foam core.

“The primary science goals for the mission are to trace the flow of energy and understand the heating of the solar corona and to explore what accelerates the solar wind,” NASA writes on its website.

“Parker Solar Probe provides a statistical survey of the outer corona.”

Oh, it’s #SpiderManDay? We have a Parker in our family, too! 🕷️@NASASun‘s Parker #SolarProbe has spent almost a year swooping and swinging close to the Sun’s intense heat and radiation. Its next close solar encounter is planned for August 27. Suit up: https://t.co/5xX5Oms8da pic.twitter.com/UxWl0D3Vdx— NASA (@NASA) August 1, 2019

As for Parker, he earned his bachelor’s degree in physics from Michigan State University before getting his doctorate at Caltech. The spacecraft’s namesake studied and proposed concepts of how stars and our sun give off energy in what he called “the solar wind.”

Version:1.0 StartHTML:000000289 EndHTML:000832155 StartFragment:000748072 EndFragment:000832123 StartSelection:000748496 EndSelection:000832069 SourceURL:https://www.mlive.com/news/2019/08/mission-studying-sun-named-for-msu-grad-surprises-nasa-with-50-more-data-than-expected.html Mission studying sun named for MSU grad surprises NASA with 50% more data than expected – mlive.com

Mission studying sun named for MSU grad surprises NASA with 50% more data than expected

Updated Aug 2, 2:26 PM; Posted Aug 2, 2:26 PM NASA’s Parker Solar Probe9

Gallery: NASA’s Parker Solar Probe2

By Benjamin Raven | braven@mlive.com

Officials working on NASA’s Parker Solar Probe mission to study the sun in unprecedented detail say they received double the data they expected from its first two solar encounters.

The Parker Solar Probe is the first NASA spacecraft to be named for a living person, who just happens to be Michigan State University graduate Eugene Parker. The U.S. space agency says it received 22 gigabytes of science data back on May 6, which is 50 percent more than it estimated/expected after the two solar encounters.

“This 22 GB is 50% more data than the team had estimated would be downlinked by this point in the mission — all because the spacecraft’s telecommunications system is performing better than pre-launch estimates,” the John’s Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory reports in a Thursday, Aug. 1 blog post.

“After characterizing the spacecraft’s operations during the commissioning phase, which began soon after launch, the Parker mission team determined that the telecom system could effectively deliver more downlink opportunities, helping the team maximize the download of science data.”

The Parker Solar Probe launched back in August 2018, and has flown closer — and faster — to the sun than has ever been done. NASA hopes the mission improves our ability to forecast major space-weather events that impact us on Earth.

NASA reported back in April of this year that the probe moved past the sun from 15 million miles away at 213,000 mph. While 15 million miles doesn’t exactly sound like a “close approach,” the space agency points out that this tied the closest approach of the sun by a spacecraft ever (also set by the Parker Solar Probe).

On top of this doubling of the data, the space agency says it expects another 25 GB of downloaded data from the probe between July 24 and Aug. 15.

“All of the expected science data collected through the first and second encounters is now on the ground,” Nickalaus Pinkine, missions operations manager for the Parker Solar Probe, said.

“As we learned more about operating in this environment and these orbits, the team did a great job of increasing data downloads of the information gathered by the spacecraft’s amazing instruments.”

Next up for the mission is its third solar encounter projected to start Aug. 27, and its third perihelion which is set to start Sept. 1. Perihelion is the point when an object reaches its closest approach to the sun.

The prove will make its second flyby of Venus the day after Christmas, and then its fourth and fifth perihelion on Jan. 29 and June 7, 2020, respectively. As it stands, the mission is scheduled to make its 24th and final close approach to the sun in June 2025.

In these close approaches, the Parker Solar Probe faces “heat and radiation unlike any spacecraft has in history.” To help it face these conditions on its journey, NASA installed a “cutting-edge heat shield” that is made of two panels of superheated carbon-composite sandwiching a 4.5-inch thick carbon foam core.

“The primary science goals for the mission are to trace the flow of energy and understand the heating of the solar corona and to explore what accelerates the solar wind,” NASA writes on its website.

“Parker Solar Probe provides a statistical survey of the outer corona.”

As for Parker, he earned his bachelor’s degree in physics from Michigan State University before getting his doctorate at Caltech. The spacecraft’s namesake studied and proposed concepts of how stars and our sun give off energy in what he called “the solar wind.”

1 / 9APNASA’s Parker Solar ProbeThis image made available by NASA shows an artist’s rendering of the Parker Solar Probe approaching the Sun. It’s designed to take solar punishment like never before, thanks to its revolutionary heat shield that’s capable of withstanding 2,500 degrees Fahrenheit (1,370 degrees Celsius). (Steve Gribben/Johns Hopkins APL/NASA via AP) ORG XMIT: NY631 AP

2 / 9NASA’s Parker Solar ProbeOn Sept. 25, 2018, Parker Solar Probe captured a view of Earth as it sped toward the first Venus gravity assist of the mission. Earth is the bright, round object visible in the right side of this image.

3 / 9(NASA/Bill Ingalls)NASA’s Parker Solar ProbeThe United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket launches NASA’s Parker Solar Probe to touch the Sun, Sunday, Aug. 12, 2018 from Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. Parker Solar Probe is humanity’s first-ever mission into a part of the Sun’s atmosphere called the corona. Here it will directly explore solar processes that are key to understanding and forecasting space weather events that can impact life on Earth. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)…More

4 / 9NASA’s Parker Solar Probe”On Jan. 19, 2019, just 161 days after its launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, NASA’s Parker Solar Probe completed its first orbit of the Sun, reaching the point in its orbit farthest from our star, called aphelion. The spacecraft has now begun the second of 24 planned orbits, on track for its second perihelion, or closest approach to the Sun, on April 4, 2019.” (NASA)

5 / 9NASA’s Parker Solar Probe

6 / 9NASA’s Parker Solar Probe

7 / 9Parker Solar ProbeJust over a month into its mission, NASA’s Parker Solar Probe has returned first-light data from each of its four instrument suites. These early observations show that each of the instruments is working well.

8 / 9NASA’s Parker Solar ProbeDr. Eugene Parker (seated in the foreground), a pioneer in heliophysics and S. Chandrasekhar distinguished service professor emeritus for the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of Chicago, watches the launch of NASA’s Parker Solar Probe. This is the first agency mission named for a living person. Standing behind Parker is Nicky Fox, Parker Solar Probe project scientist at Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory. The liftoff took place at 3:31 a.m. EDT on Sunday, Aug. 12, 2018. The spacecraft was built by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland. The mission will perform the closest-ever observations of a star when it travels through the Sun’s atmosphere, called the corona. The probe will rely on measurements and imaging to revolutionize our understanding of the corona and the Sun-Earth connection.…More

9 / 9NASA’s Parker Solar ProbeOn Friday, Aug. 10, 2018, at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, the United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket stands ready to boost NASA’s Parker Solar Probe on a mission to study the Sun following rollback of the Mobile Service Tower. Parker Solar Probe will perform the closest-ever observations of a star when it travels through the Sun’s atmosphere, called the corona. The probe will rely on measurements and imaging to revolutionize our understanding of the corona and the Sun-Earth connection.

NASA’s sun-sailing mission is proving a surprising success: Quest to work out how the star works yields 50 percent more data than initially projected

  • NASA’s Parker Probe has transferred 50 percent more data than projected 
  • The probe was aided by better than expected communications systems
  • Data will be pored over and released to the public later this year 
  • NASA hopes the info will help unlock mysteries about how the sun works

When it comes to collecting data NASA‘s sun-sailing Parker Probe is on fire. 

According to the agency, the Parker Solar Probe, which was sent out on its mission to orbit the Sun last year, just delivered a payload of data 50 percent larger than what scientists expected.

The transmission dropped 22 gigabytes of data from its two first encounters with the Sun says NASA.

The Parker Probe has delivered a payload of data that far outpaces projections according to NASA

The Parker Probe has delivered a payload of data that far outpaces projections according to NASA

‘All of the expected science data collected through the first and second encounters is now on the ground,’ said Nickalaus Pinkine, Parker Solar Probe mission operations manager at APL in a statement. 

‘As we learned more about operating in this environment and these orbits, the team did a great job of increasing data downloads of the information gathered by the spacecraft’s amazing instruments.’

A boon in information was aided by a better-than-expected performance from the probe’s telecommunications system which NASA says has helped to set up more downlink opportunities.

In that extra data are unprecedented insights into our sun, including information on particles, waves, and observations of the Sun’s corona and the solar environment.

The probe, about the size of a family compact car, has traveled closer to the sun than any other man-made object, enduring some of the most brutal conditions imaginable. 

Those include cosmic radiation 500 times more powerful than radiation on Earth and temperatures of 1,300°C (2,400°F).

The Parker Probe has endured brutal conditions including unprecedented radiation and speeds that outpace any reached by a human-made object

The Parker Probe has endured brutal conditions including unprecedented radiation and speeds that outpace any reached by a human-made object

Because of the Sun’s immense gravitational force, the probe has also traveled faster than any object made by man, hurtling around the star at blistering 213,200 mph (343,000 kph) – fast enough to fly between New York and London 39 times in one hour.

Scientists hope the pioneering probe will help unlock mysteries about our sun, like why its corona – the outermost part of the Sun’s atmosphere – is 300 times hotter than the surface and how the Sun produces giant plumes of plasma called solar flares.

The closest it will ever get to the Sun will be on December 24, 2024, where it is expected to fly just 3.9 million miles (6.3 million km) away from the surface, more than seven times further than its predecessor, Helios 2, which reached only four per cent of the distance between the Sun and Earth.

It’s final mission, in about five years, will send the instrument plummeting into the Sun where it will completely burn up.

For now, Parker will continue to collect data, with its next fly-by happening on August 27. Data already collected by the craft will be made available to the public later this year according to NASA. 

HOW WILL THE PARKER SOLAR PROBE GET SO CLOSE TO THE SUN?

The Parker Solar Probe mission will require 55 times more energy than would be needed to reach Mars, according to NASA.

It launched atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy, one of the most powerful rockets in the world, with a third stage attached.

But, its trajectory and speed are critical in getting to the correct orbit.

As Earth, and everything on it, are traveling at about 67,000 miles per hour in a direction that’s sideways to the sun, craft must be launched backward to cancel out the sideways motion, NASA explains.

The Parker probe is heading past the sun, so it will need to remove about 53,000 miles per hour, according to the space agency.

 The Parker Solar Probe will swing around Venus a total of seven times, with each pass slowing it down some and pushing it closer and closer to the sun. These orbits are shown in the animation above

This will require a boost from the powerful Delta IV rocket, and several gravity assists from Venus to slow it down.

The probe will rely on a series of gravity assists from Venus to slow down its sideways motion, allowing it to get just 3.8 million miles away from the sun’s surface.

‘In this case, rather than speeding up the spacecraft, as in a typical gravity assist, Venus slows down its sideways motion so the spacecraft can get close to the sun,’ NASA explains.

‘When it finally does get close, Parker Solar Probe will have lost much of its sideways speed, but gained a great deal of overall speed thanks to the sun’s gravity.

‘Parker Solar Probe will hurtle past the sun at 430,000 miles per hour.’

At its closest approach, it will get just 3.8 million miles from the surface of the sun, making it the only spacecraft to ever venture so close. NASA explains: Why is it so difficult to go to the sun?

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