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You were all groomed by Michael Jackson! THE ENTIRE FUCKING PLANET!

Michael Jackson groomed the entire planet… except for me! 😀 My mum knows a hell of a lot in regards to paedophilia and child abuse… it’s not that I wasn’t allowed to listen to him, but I was strongly dissuaded from doing so…

Once, in 1994?… in a Woolworths store, my mum went to buy Snoop Doggy Dogg Doggystyle (gangsta classic), and the woman serving said…
“Oh we don’t sell that kind of music here, he’s a suspected gang member”
My mothers response… 🙂
“Do you have Michael Jackson?”
“Of course”
“Well he’s a suspected paedophile, so what does that say about your company?”

BOOM!… I didn’t choose the Thug Life, my mum chose it for me! 😀
Hell of a lot better than being groomed by that fucking paedo freak!

I can’t believe people are so shocked.. or are they just pretending to be? :/ How the fuck are people still defending him? … oh I forgot, it’s a completely sick and deranged civilisation that is about to collapse! 😀

Without us noticing, it looks like Michael Jackson groomed us for decades.

The documentary Leaving Neverland, which details the alleged abuse of James Safechuck and Wade Robson at the hands of Michael Jackson, has hit a cultural nerve.
There is a sense, in my mind at least, that while Jackson was inviting young boys into his bedroom in the early hours of the morning, we were all sitting in the room next door. Perhaps listening to Bad on repeat.
We cannot say this time that we didn’t know, because we did.
Perhaps the most famous pop star of all time stood on the world stage and told us that he slept in beds with children and we collectively shrugged our shoulders.
We bought into a logic that, in retrospect, didn’t make sense.
If the allegations are true, then James Safechuck and Wade Robson were groomed. Their mothers were groomed.
And so were we.
“When I was a kid,” Jackson told us, “I was denied not only a childhood, but I was denied love.”
And who denied that to him?
Well, we did.

Jackson was six when he joined the Jackson Brothers, a band that one year later would become The Jackson 5.
We were greedy. We bought albums that we would later learn were the product of child labour. We laughed and applauded and demanded more as an 11-year-old Jackson sung ‘I Want You Back’ – a song he couldn’t possibly have understood. Behind it all was abuse and exploitation, and we funded it.
When we began to raise an eyebrow about Jackson’s behaviour at his Neverland Valley Ranch in California, he told us, “I wanted a place that I could create everything that I never had as a child. I was always on tour, traveling. You know?
“We have busloads of kids, who don’t get to see those things… they enjoy it in a pure, loving, fun way. It’s people with the dirty mind that think like that.”
The gut feeling we had that something wasn’t right, Jackson told us, was our own fault. We were sexualising the platonic. What an awful thing to do to an innocent man – to let our ‘dirty’ minds get in the way of philanthropy.
And so, we sat in our room next door, and turned up Bad a little louder.
But the noises didn’t go away. The accusations kept coming.

Then we saw it, with our own eyes, during an interview with British journalist Martin Bashir in 2003.
“Michael, you’re a 44-year-old man now,” Bashir asked. “What do you get out of this?”
Jackson sat across from his interviewer, holding tightly the hand of 12-year-old Gavin Arvizo.

“Why can’t you share your bed? That’s the most loving thing to do, to share your bed with someone,” he replied, as Arvizo rested his head on Jackson’s shoulder.
There were hints of coercion -“If you love me, you’ll sleep on the bed,” Jackson admitted he had said to Arvizo. The physical affection was blatant.
But we liked the idea that Jackson just loved, really loved, children. It felt true because we so desperately wanted it to be.
So we turned up the music a little louder.
Maybe it was that Jackson didn’t attempt to hide what he was doing that made him all the more convincing.
Like the family friend invited into the home, or the Priest who asks the school boys to stay back, or the uncle who takes a particular interest in a child, there’s a level of visibility that renders one invisible.
Isn’t that the paradox of sexual abuse?
Often, the perpetrator doesn’t creep into the window in the middle of the night. Rather, they’re the person you greet at the door, and then step kindly out of the way, welcoming them in.

We all stepped out of the way for Michael Jackson, didn’t we?
For decades, it now seems, we were groomed by the most famous man in the world.
And now it’s time to turn down the music and listen to what might have been happening next door all along.

‘Leaving Neverland’ shows that we were all groomed by Michael Jackson

Michael Jackson’s trick was to groom an entire culture

Emma Brockes
Like other prominent and powerful men he enjoyed the benefit of the doubt, despite all the evidence against him

It was hard this week – watching R Kelly jump up and down on CBS while claiming his greatest problem was being “big-hearted”, and sitting through four hours of Michael Jackson revelations – to hang on to the idea that the truth has implacable meaning. In both cases, the sense of outrage from the accused parties (in Jackson’s case, his estate) was palpable and brought to mind another example of male-pattern entitlement: that of Brett Kavanaugh during his supreme court confirmation hearing.
“They are trying to bring us down,” Jackson was reported as saying to one of his victims, while asking him to lie in court. The double-think was part of the abuse. The narrative was only ever these men’s to control, and one suspects that control was in large part what they got off on. Guilt or innocence seemed secondary to the fury generated by the presumption of those who dared to doubt them.

And the prominence of these men, across different worlds and eras, has traditionally been a part of their camouflage. It seemed to me, after watching Leaving Neverland, that the biggest grooming project was less of any one individual than of a culture as a whole. Most of us are primed to believe that a powerful man is more likely to be telling the truth than his nobody accuser, even though he has so much to lose. Revisiting child abuse allegations against Jackson from 1993 and again from 2004 brought on an almost out-of-body experience. All that footage of him wandering around holding 10-year-old boys’ hands; the admission that he slept in a bed with them; the way he got older but the age of his “friends” never did. It was hard to condemn the two mothers in the film when their faith in Jackson’s innocence – or at least their doubt in his guilt – had been shared by the rest of the world.
One did blame them, though, of course. While the fathers in the film floundered on the sidelines, it was the mothers Jackson zeroed in on and his techniques pertained, in the first instance, as much to these women as to their young sons. Both James Safechuck and Wade Robson’s mothers talked of the separate relationship they thought they had with Jackson, how he courted them in their own right; and although they both spoke of it as a mother-son thing, it was clearly a matter of seduction. Meanwhile, he was teaching their sons to hate their mothers and distrust women in general.

It was this, I think, that felt like the oddest reversal of received wisdom: that whether Jackson was a lovable weirdo or something darker, he was essentially a guileless individual. In fact, it becomes clear through the two men’s testimony that he was, like all abusers, deeply calculating. He went to huge lengths to set up the conditions for abuse. Large parts of his career – putting young boys in his videos and on stage with him – weren’t artistic decisions but a means of furthering his aims as an abuser.
Another recent documentary, Abducted in Plain Sight, told the unbelievable story of a girl taken from under her parents’ noses by a neighbour who’d seduced them both. This happened in 1974, and many of us said in response to the foolish credulity of the parents, “Those were different times, it couldn’t happen now.” I’m not so sure.

‘Master manipulator’ Michael Jackson groomed the world, accusers claim

James Safechuck and Wade Robson appeared on the Victoria Derbyshire show.

Michael Jackson accuser James Safechuck claimed the late singer “groomed the world” as he accused the pop star of driving a wedge between his parents to isolate him.

Safechuck, who alongside Wade Robson is the subject of the documentary Leaving Neverland, said Jackson was “meticulous” in how he embedded himself into his family.
Describing the alleged abuse by Jackson during an appearance on the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire show, Safechuck said the singer groomed not only him but his family and the wider public.

Michael Jackson is the subject of a controversial documentary (Yui Mok/PA)
Robson, who also appeared on the show alongside the documentary’s director Dan Reed, called Jackson a “master manipulator”.
Leaving Neverland features both men’s testimonies and has provoked a furious reaction from the Jackson estate, which is suing HBO – the US TV channel that co-produced it alongside Channel 4.
Safechuck, 40, said: “There’s a long grooming process for Michael. He inserts himself into your family and becomes part of of your family.
“He grooms the children and grooms the parents as well.
“It’s a meticulous build-up for him to be able to do that and it takes him a while to build the trust. It doesn’t happen overnight.
“Not letting our parents off or saying it’s not their fault but I think people need to understand that it just doesn’t happen right away.

“He’s also a major star. People know him already. There are years of them feeling comfortable with this star that they have seen on TV.
“It shows how Michael groomed the world.”
Jackson’s brothers Tito, Marlon and Jackie, and his nephew Taj, have dismissed the allegations, saying the controversial programme is “all about the money”.
Robson, 36, said: “Most of the time it’s not the scary guy in the van in the alleyway.
“Of course, that happens sometimes but I think it is the minority of cases.
“Most of the time it’s the coach, the uncle, the teacher, the stepfather, the father, the mother, whatever.

“Somebody who is absolutely trusted, who has gained the trust of the child first and foremost, then the whole family. This was the case.
“Michael made sure from day one that he had a really special relationship with me, and that he had a really special separate relationship with my mother and with my sister and then my father.
“Right from day one, in an unnoticeable way, he started drawing this wedge between myself and my father, my mother and my father.
“He was just a master manipulator.”
The men later appeared in New York where they were interviewed by Oprah Winfrey following a screening of the documentary in front of 100 sex abuse survivors.
During the discussion, Robson revealed he had received a death threat on Thursday, saying: “I just received another death threat last night.”
Winfrey described child sex abuse as “a scourge on humanity” before warning the pair to expect further backlash in response to the film.
She asked them: “All the fans and the estate. You guys know you’re gonna get it, right? I’m gonna get it. Are you prepared for that?”
Two-part documentary Leaving Neverland is due to air on Channel 4 on March 6 and March 7.

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