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Watch Israel’s historic moon launch live… The greatest sling shot since King fucking David!

Look at this!

Watch Israel’s historic moon launch live

The Beresheet ship will be hitching a ride with the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket this Thursday.

Israel will attempt to make history this week when it launches a ship into outer space. When it lands on the moon, Israel will become only the fourth country to ever make a lunar landing – after Russia, the U.S. and China.
The ship – called “Beresheet,” Hebrew for Genesis – has been undergoing final tests in Cape Canaveral, Florida for the past several weeks. Weather permitting, the liftoff is scheduled to take place from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on Thursday, February 21 at 8:45 PM EST (3:45 AM in Israel). The ship is carpooling into space aboard SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket. The SpaceIL ship will be riding along with various satellites and other research equipment, all of which will get dropped off first. The Beresheet will be the last passenger dropped off in the SpaceX carpool.
The Falcon 9 was first created in 2010. It has launched more than 60 times and has a success rate of 96.8%. “Please cross your fingers because this is a hard mission and we need all the help that we can get,” SpaceIL co-founder Yonatan Winetraub told From the Grapevine when we spoke with him this month. You can read our entire interview with him to find out how the idea first came about, the ship’s planned lunar experiments and what surprising gifts are onboard.
A live video feed will begin at approximately 8:30 PM EST on Thursday, February 21 (3:30 AM in Israel). Those wishing to view the launch live can watch the video on the From The Grapevine Facebook page. We will also be live-tweeting the progress of the ship on our Twitter page.
And, in case you miss the live feed, check back on FromTheGrapevine.com about an hour or two after the launch. We’ll be posting a wrap-up article which will include a video of the launch.

First private space probe on the moon could bring new era of space exploration’

“We’re looking at an entirely new model for space exploration beyond Earth orbit.”

Beresheet is the first word of the Hebrew Bible, meaning “in the beginning.” It’s also the apt name of the robotic lander that an Israeli start-up is planning to launch to the moon on Feb. 21.
If the mission succeeds, Beresheet will be the first Israeli spacecraft to travel beyond Earth orbit and the first private lander on the moon. The mission could also mark the beginning of a new spaceflight era — one in which companies go where previously only nations have gone.

John Horack, an aerospace engineer at Ohio State University and a spaceflight expert, is giddy at the possibilities. “Nothing like this has been tried before,” he says. “We’re looking at an entirely new model for space exploration beyond Earth orbit.”
From its funding to its engineering to its modest size (Beresheet is about the size of commercial refrigerator), almost everything about the Israeli probe goes against tradition. Its inspiration sprang not from a government program but from the Google Lunar XPrize, an “American Idol”-like competition that promised $30 million to any private team that could put a lander on the moon, have it travel 500 meters (about 1,600 feet) and send back photos and video documenting its journey.

In 2009, the XPrize captured the imagination of Yonatan Winetraub, at the time a 22-year-old Israeli aerospace engineer who was spending a year at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. He wondered: Why not try out for the moonshot award himself? “Unfortunately, I couldn’t find people who were crazy enough to follow my idea,” he says.
When Winetraub returned to Israel, he met two kindred spirits, computer engineer Yariv Bash and entrepreneur Kfir Damari. “The three of us sat down in a bar in the suburbs of Tel Aviv, and as the alcohol level went up we were becoming more and more determined to do this thing,” he recalls. That was when the trio founded SpaceIL, the nonprofit that created Beresheet.
It’s been high drama ever since. SpaceIL submitted its proposal to the XPrize committee just 45 minutes before the Dec. 31, 2010, deadline. The first three concepts for Beresheet failed their engineering evaluations, teaching SpaceIL painful lessons in how to get the most out of every drop of fuel. And when the XPrize competition expired last year without a winner, SpaceIL had to scramble for funds to complete its lander.
Now Beresheet is at Cape Canaveral in Florida, less than two weeks away from its scheduled liftoff aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.
Like an Uber to orbit
From the start, SpaceIL and its partner, Israel Aerospace Industries, have struggled against a major handicap: They had never worked on a moon mission before. Every component of the lander presented a fresh challenge, especially as the engineers struggled to keep the craft lightweight and on budget.
In its final form, Beresheet weighs 350 pounds, not counting a half-ton of onboard propellant. The mission costs add up to $95 million, much of it underwritten by Morris Kahn, an Israeli telecom billionaire and philanthropist.
For comparison, NASA’s last robotic moon lander was Surveyor 7 all the way back in 1968. It weighed twice as much as Beresheet, and the Surveyor program cost $3.5 billion in current dollars (although that covered seven separate missions).
Beresheet is a secondary payload on its SpaceX rocket, meaning it’s tagging along on a launch for another SpaceX customer. Winetraub likens the arrangement to an Uber rideshare: The other customer takes up most of the space on the rocket and so pays for most of the launch.
That ride will take Beresheet only as far as Earth’s orbit. From there, it will have to fire its own small rockets and navigate three circuitous loops around Earth and two around the moon before landing on Mare Serenitatis, a volcanic plain on the north-central part of the lunar nearside.
“In the Apollo days they got to the moon within two days, but it will take us about one and a half months,” Winetraub says. “That’s how it is if you don’t want to pay full price.”
Mapping the moon with magnets and lasers
Once Beresheet reaches the moon in April, its onboard magnetometer will measure the subtle magnetic field embedded in the lunar surface. According to Oded Aharonson, of Israel’s Weizmann Institute of Science, the lead scientist for the experiment, the observed pattern of magnetism should reveal what conditions were like more than 4 billion years ago, when molten rock cooled and solidified to form the moon’s outer layers.

OH FUCK OFF! NASA DID NOT PUT MAN ON THE MOON! WE ALL KNOW IT! I ask every Israeli… every Jew if they believe the Apollo missions where real, and they look you dead in the eye, smile… and change the subject.

“They turned Nazi into NASA
They just couldn’t waaaaaaiiiiit!” ;D

 

Can Israel’s first lunar mission solve a magnetic mystery?

With SpaceIL’s unmanned spacecraft set to lift off next week, the organization’s Science Team has included instruments that will help unlock the secrets of the Moon’s magnetic rocks.

After eight years of preparations costing $100 million, the SpaceIL Israeli unmanned spacecraft “Beresheet” (Genesis) is tentatively scheduled to take off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, on February 21 and reach the rocky surface of the Moon six to eight weeks later following multiple orbits around Earth.

Prof. Oded Aharonson of the Weizmann Institute of Science’s Earth and Planetary Sciences Department hopes to be at the launch along with the other seven members of SpaceIL International Science Team he heads.
The team members – from Israel, France and the United States — put scientific instruments aboard Beresheet to take measurements that they hope will shed new light on one of the basic enigmas about the Moon:
Although rocks collected by Apollo missions were found to be magnetic, the Moon’s iron core does not generate a global magnetic field as does the Earth’s iron core.
“On Earth the rocks are magnetized from the global magnetic field, but how and when did the lunar rocks get magnetized? If we can measure the magnetism of these rocks, we can begin to understand how and when this magnetism arose,” Aharonson tells ISRAEL21c.

Weizmann Institute of Science Prof. Oded Aharonson and the Beresheet lunar craft at Israel Aerospace Industries. Photo: courtesy
Scientists have various theories about how a temporary magnetic “dynamo” may have been generated on the Moon, perhaps from repeated asteroid impacts or from the long-ago dynamo action of the iron core that is now cool. But nobody knows how long that dynamo lasted.
“As we find younger and younger rocks – say 2 billion years old instead of 3 billion years old — that still have a magnetic signature, then we conclude the dynamo must have been alive for longer than previously hypothesized.
We’re motivated by this basic science question, to help us understand the universe around us,” says Aharonson, who earned his PhD at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Magnetometer expert Asaf Grosz from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev’s department of electrical and computer engineering helped integrate a sensor built at UCLA onto the Beresheet spacecraft.
This instrument will be calibrated by measuring the magnetic field of the craft itself while it is still on its way. Once Beresheet is in orbit around the Moon, the instrument will be able to detect and measure the lunar magnetic field in different areas.

The lander will employ this “retroreflector” to return a laser beam to its source on a NASA Moon Orbiter and thus determine Beresheet’s precise location. Photo: courtesy
The craft also carries a unique array of mirrors provided by NASA for reflecting a laser beam of light precisely back in the direction of its source, a NASA Moon Orbiter (LRO), enabling the scientific team to track the position of Beresheet on the surface.
The landing site was chosen carefully by the scientific team to ensure a smooth and safe touchdown in a suitable area for performing the scientific experiments and relaying results back to Earth.
“We’ve had a lot of experience studying the surface of the Moon including its topography and temperatures, so we synthesized all this information and narrowed it down to a dozen candidate landing sites without a lot of rocks and slopes, from which we selected the primary site to aim for,” says Aharonson. This area covers a few kilometers.
The Israeli spacecraft will be launched on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. If it touches down successfully it will make Israel only the fourth country to land there after the US, the former Soviet Union and China.
SpaceIL is an independent initiative started in 2011 by Yariv Bash, Kfir Damari and Yonatan Winetraub to compete in the Google LunarX Prize competition. Although the competition officially ended in March 2018 with no winners, SpaceIL and its donors decided to continue working toward the goal of landing on the moon.
The 180-kilo Beresheet craft, built at Israel Aerospace Industries, was transported on January 17 in a cargo plane from Ben-Gurion Airport to Florida.
“After eight years of hard work, our dream has come true: We finally have a spacecraft,” said SpaceIL CEO Ido Anteby. “Shipping the spacecraft to the United States is the first stage of a complicated and historic journey to the moon. This is the first of many exciting moments, as we look forward to the forthcoming launch in Cape Canaveral.”

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