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Report – Human civilisation is facing enviro-MENTAL breakdown… THE COLLAPSE OF HUMAN CIVILISATION! :D

“Human civilisation is having a complete mental breakdown (has been for the past 12,800 years)… environmental breakdown is just one of the symptoms!

The solution is to cull the human population down to maybe 500,000,000.

You can offer humans EVERY fucking solution there is to prevent this… EVERY SOLUTION! The sad truth is 99% of human beings will not only ignore those solutions, they will do EVERYTHING in their power to prevent any solution being implemented.

Potentially humans could create a civilisation free of war, crime, human suffering and environmental damage, quite easily sustaining a population of maybe 30 billion… …
but nooooo the masses are hell bent on creating a living hell for themselves (and their children and grand children).

THEY ARE ANIMALS! THEY ARE LOWER THAN ANIMALS! THEY ARE THE ONLY SPECIES ON THE PLANET WHICH WILL PURPOSELY DESTROY IT’S OWN ECO-SYSTEM!”

guide1.jpg
guide
Georgia Guidestones

Maintain humanity under 500,000,000 in perpetual balance with nature.
Guide reproduction wisely — improving fitness and diversity.
Unite humanity with a living new language.
Rule passion — faith — tradition — and all things with tempered reason.
Protect people and nations with fair laws and just courts.
Let all nations rule internally resolving external disputes in a world court.
Avoid petty laws and useless officials.
Balance personal rights with social duties.
Prize truth — beauty — love — seeking harmony with the infinite.
Be not a cancer on the earth — Leave room for nature — Leave room for nature.

guidestones_main.jpg.560x0_q80_crop-smart

Environment in multiple crises – report

Politicians and policymakers have failed to grasp the gravity of the environmental crisis facing the Earth, a report claims.
The think-tank IPPR says human impacts have reached a critical stage and threaten to destabilise society and the global economy.
Scientists warn of a potentially deadly combination of factors.
These include climate change, mass loss of species, topsoil erosion, forest felling and acidifying oceans.
The report from the centre-left Institute for Public Policy Research says these factors are “driving a complex, dynamic process of environmental destabilisation that has reached critical levels.
“This destabilisation is occurring at speeds unprecedented in human history and, in some cases, over billions of years.”

So what is needed?
The IPPR warns that the window of opportunity to avoid catastrophic outcomes is rapidly closing.
The authors urge three shifts in political understanding: on the scale and pace of environmental breakdown; the implications for societies; and the subsequent need for transformative change.
​They say since 1950, the number of floods across the world has increased by 15 times, extreme temperature events by 20 times, and wildfires seven-fold.
At least climate change features in policy discussions, they say – but other vitally important impacts barely figure.

What issues are being under-played?
Topsoil is being lost 10 to 40 times faster than it is being replenished by natural processes ​
Since the mid-20th Century, 30% of the world’s arable land has become unproductive due to erosion
95% of the Earth’s land areas could become degraded by 2050
These matters are close to home for British politicians, the authors argue, with the average population sizes of the most threatened species in the UK having decreased by two-thirds since 1970.
The UK is described as one of the most nature-depleted countries in the world.
Some 2.2 million tonnes of UK topsoil is eroded annually, and over 17% of arable land shows signs of erosion.
Nearly 85% of fertile peat topsoil in East Anglia has been lost since 1850, with the remainder at risk of being lost over next 30–60 years.
The IPPR says many scientists believe we have entered a new era of rapid environmental change.
The report warns: “We define this as the ‘age of environmental breakdown’ to better highlight the severity of the scale, pace and implications of environmental destabilisation resulting from aggregate human activity.”
Will society take the solutions on offer?
Simon Lewis, Professor of Global Change Science at University College London, told BBC News: “IPPR are right to say that environmental change is happening ever-faster and threatens to destabilise society.
“Future problems with food supplies could cause price spikes that drive civil unrest, while increases in levels of migration can strain societies.
“Both together could overload political institutions and global networks of trade.
“This century will be marked by rapid social and environmental change – that is certain. What is less clear is if societies can make wise political choices to avoid disaster in the future.”
Harriet Bulkeley, a geography professor at Durham University, told BBC News that the IPPR paper was a good interpretation of the current evidence, but she said it raised the question of how firm evidence of environmental threats had to be to prompt government action.
“We know lots of good things to do,” she said, “but often the argument is made that we need to have ‘evidence-based policy’.
“This can, of course, be used as an excuse for delay. So, I guess the question is how much more evidence is needed for action?”
A UK government spokesperson said: “We are committed to leaving our environment in a better state than we found it through our 25 Year Environment Plan and the forthcoming Environment Bill.
“Over 25 years we will replenish depleted soils, rid our seas and rivers of the rubbish trashing our planet, cut greenhouse gas emissions, cleanse our air of toxic pollutants, and develop cleaner, more sustainable energy sources.
“The Environment Bill will also create a new environmental body, the Office for Environmental Protection, to hold us to account on this commitment.”

The collapse of civilisation could be just around the corner…

A new report suggests the effects of global warming could lead to migration, conflict, famine and societal breakdown

The collapse of civilisation could be just around the corner, as a result of human-caused environmental change occurring at an unprecedented scale and pace.
That’s the conclusion reached in a new report from the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR), which suggests a combination of global warming, damaged soils, fewer pollinators, chemical leaks and ocean acidification means impacts on the planet have reached a critical stage.
It argues mainstream political and policy debates have failed to recognise this and adds the situation is now so bad that is risks eroding the conditions upon which socioeconomic stability is possible.
The report shows since 2005, floods have increased 15-fold, temperatures have become 20-times more extreme and wildfires have increased seven-fold.

In addition, fertile soils are now being lost 40 times faster than they are being replenished by natural processes and vertebrate populations have fallen by an average of 60% since the 1970s.
The IPPR warns these issues could cause economic instability, large-scale involuntary migration, conflict, famine and the collapse of social and economic systems if they continue unabated and stresses the consequences of environmental breakdown will likely fall hardest on the poorest, who are most vulnerable to its effects and least responsible for the problem.
It calls for policymakers to realise the scale and pace of environmental breakdown, the implications for societies and the subsequent need for transformative change.
The report says this is vitally important in the UK, which it warns is already one of the “most nature-depleted countries in the world”.

World is facing unprecedented ‘environmental breakdown’ and window to prevent catastrophe is closing, report warns

Report ‘This is a Crisis: Facing up to the Age of Environment’ describes the UK one of the ‘most nature-depleted countries in the world’

Human-induced environmental change is occurring at an unprecedented scale and is reaching the point where we will no longer be able to stop its progress, a new report has warned.

The report, from the Institute for Public Police Research (IPPR), claims the the damage to land, soil, air, water, animal populations and climate change is happening so rapidly that the world is facing an unprecedented “environmental breakdown” that could threaten the stability of societies. The left wing think tank warns in its paper, This is a Crisis: Facing up to the Age of Environmental Breakdown, that the window to prevent catastrophe is closing, and that mainstream political and policy debates have failed to recognise that human impacts on the environment have reached a critical stage. Conflict, famine and collapse of economic systems The IPPR studied of dozens of academic papers on climate change to calculate the levels of devastation the UK could face. The impacts of environmental breakdown could include financial instability, large-scale involuntary migration, conflict, famine and the potential collapse of social and economic systems, it said. Researchers found that since 2005 the number of floods across the world has increased by 15 times. The signs of the environment’s deterioration are many and far-reaching (Pexels) Global vertebrate populations have fallen by 60 per cent since the 1970s, a signifier of climate change, pollution, and deforestation, the report states. And 30 per cent of the world’s formerly arable land – land suitable for farming – is no longer in action due to erosion. At the current rate of environmental destabilisation, 95 per cent of the Earth’s land areas could become degraded by 2050. UK severely ‘nature-depleted’ Among the worrying statistics, the UK is named as one of the “most nature-depleted countries in the world”. And the researchers behind the project are insisting that without acknowledging the extent of the issues that have been “human-induced”, the opportunity to avoid catastrophic outcomes in societies around the world is “rapidly closing”. What issues have been highlighted in the report? More than 75 per cent of the earth’s land is substantially degraded The past four years are the warmest ever recorded Top soil is being lost at 10 to 40 times more than the rate it can be replaced Vertebrate populations have fallen by 60 per cent since the Seventies Speaking at the conference launching the report on Tuesday, senior visiting fellow at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at LSE Dmitri Zenghis said that “calling the environmental crisis anything but a crisis would be misleading”. However, he is one of several experts who believes that if the Government and policy-makers take the issues seriously “there are grounds for optimism and the two can work together powerfully”. “There’s a heck of a lot individuals can do themselves and by pushing their politicians and representatives into action, rather than withdrawing,” he said. “Just talking about sacrifice won’t get there. Nobody wants to be the first person or country to move. But as we talk about opportunity to do things more efficiently, to make cities more liveable, and other changes that benefit people, then you start to get everyone taking action,” he added. Defra addressing concerns Kim Croasdale, Sustainability Networks Manager of the Sustainable Development Unit for the NHS, Public Health and Social Care said “active transport” links which encourage walking and cycling are essential in combatting environmental instability. Ms Croasdale said: “If we all work together we can be far more than fighting to survive. We have an opportunity to make our systems stronger than ever.” The movement has been named #ThisIsACrisis (Pexels) The Government’s environmental department, Defra, said it is taking the concerns of the think tank seriously. It is bringing forward the first Environment Bill for more than 20 years to help improve the state of the environment.

It has drafted clauses for the Environment Bill to establish a new, independent environment body called the Office for Environmental Protection to create a statutory framework for environmental principles, and put our flagship 25 Year Environment Plan into law. A spokesperson from the department said: “We are committed to leaving our environment in a better state than we found it through our 25 Year Environment Plan and the forthcoming Environment Bill. “Over 25 years we will replenish depleted soils, rid our seas and rivers of the rubbish trashing our planet, cut greenhouse gas emissions, cleanse our air of toxic pollutants, and develop cleaner, more sustainable energy sources. “The Environment Bill will also create a new environmental body, the Office for Environmental Protection, to hold us to account on this commitment.”

Climate change expert David Wallace-Wells explains why it’s the end of the world as we know it

In the past 25 years the biggest damage to the environment has been done No major industrial nation is on track to meet the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to well below 2°C Air pollution is already killing nine million people a year For a prophet of doom, David Wallace-Wells seems rather neat and unruffled. We meet over a cup of tea in a hotel next to Charing Cross station as the whirl and honks of central London’s traffic, human and vehicular, take place beneath us. A softly, swiftly spoken New Yorker, his calm demeanor belies the opening words of “The Uninhabitable Earth”, a 7,000-word article that he wrote in 2017 – now expanded into a book – that offered an apocalyptic view of climate change and subsequently went virulently viral. Worse than you think “It is worse, much worse, that you think”, he wrote, presenting his theories with snappy titles that read like the menu in hell: Doomsday; Heat Death; The End of Food; Climate Plagues; Unbreathable Air; Perpetual War; Permanent Economic Collapse; Poisoned Oceans. “It is unlikely that all of these warming scenarios will be fully realised, largely because the devastation along the way will shake our complacency. But those scenarios, and not the present climate, are the baseline. In fact, they are our schedule,” he explained. “Two degrees of warming used to be considered the threshold of catastrophe: tens of millions of climate refugees unleashed upon an unprepared world. Now two degrees is our goal.” Extinction porn or the greatest story of all time? His story was described by some of his critics as “deeply irresponsible”, “alarmist”, written in a “sloppy and hyperbolic” manner, “leans very hard on the EXTINCTION PORN angle”. Other readers found it “well-researched and on target”, a “formidable” story that used language that’s “visceral, visual and memorable”. Surprisingly, perhaps, many of those critics weren’t climate-change deniers, but climate scientists – perhaps disgruntled that, despite his apparent assurance on the subject and that of the experts whose findings he used to make his shopping list of horror, Wallace-Wells isn’t one of them, but the deputy editor of New York Magazine. So, neither a wild-eyed soothsayer nor a white-coated boffin or field scientist, but a journalist on a story that he describes to me as “the greatest story of our time – you could say the greatest story of all time”. David Wallace-Wells, journalist turned author, in New York A collective delusion In a nutshell, his scoop was that we’re deluded as to how bad climate change already is, how much more awful it’s going to be, how fast it’s happening and the extent to which it will change everything about how we live and who we are. He’s followed up his – I think, but I am also no climate scientist – well-written, captivating, occasionally wry and utterly petrifying article into his new book The Uninhabitable Earth: A Story of the Future. On the one hand, it’s not a light read. He’s got a great way with words but that doesn’t take the sting out of the fact that (spoiler alert) in the past 25 years – less than my lifetime and, perhaps, yours – the biggest damage to the environment has been done. That when temperatures rise, so does violence. That air pollution is, right now, killing nine million people a year. That no major industrial nation is on track to meet the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to well below 2°C. And that’s just where we’re at now, not where we’re heading. On the other, it’s quite the thriller. Which is how he came to write about climate change in the first place. “I came to this subject as a reader before I came to it as a writer,” he says. “As I followed the news about science generally, I was seeing more and more terrifying stuff about climate science. As an editor I’m always keeping an eye out for untold stories and the gap between the findings I was seeing in academic research and the way that climate was being talked about in publications like my own, and others, felt so big that there had to be a storytelling opportunity there. The more that I collected the research, the bigger that story seemed. Two degrees of warming were meant to be a ceiling – they’re more of a floor “The two degrees [of temperature increase] that we were taught to think of as a ceiling were really more of a floor of warming. I knew, especially as I learnt more, that in addition to being worse, climate change was also much more present, more local, and that it wasn’t just sea level – there were all of these other impacts that were going to affect everything, everyone, wherever you live on the planet. Where we’re headed, even in a median outcome, is f**king terrifying. Rising temperatures Extra warming on top of the approximately 1°C we have seen so far would amplify the risks and associated impacts, with implications for the world and its inhabitants. This would be the case even if the global warming is held at 1.5°C, just half a degree above where we are now, and would be further amplified at 2°C of global warming. Reaching 2°C instead of 1.5°C of global warming would lead to substantial warming of extreme hot days in all land regions. It would also lead to an increase in heavy rainfall in some regions, particularly in the high latitudes of the northern hemisphere, potentially raising the risk of flooding. Some regions, such as the Mediterranean, are projected to become drier at 2°C vs 1.5°C of global warming. The impacts of any additional warming would include stronger melting of ice sheets and glaciers, and increased sea-level rise. Source: IPCC “My understanding of climate change 15 years ago, even five years ago, was that it could be a big problem, but that the worst impacts were going to hit us far in the future, and that gave us a lot of time to prepare and grow and develop technology. So my sense of urgency wasn’t that strong. The effects of Storm Eleanor. Extreme weather conditions will just become weather in the future, Wallace-Wells predicts (Photo: Getty) “I’ve lived my whole life in cities, and one of things that taught me was that nature was elsewhere, it was avoidable, and in fact it didn’t even touch my life in a dramatic way. But the sense of the story being bigger and more dramatic than was being told as I wrote the piece, and especially as I started working on the book, grew. Manhattan is too rich to let drown. Queens, on the other hand… “New York City is a particular example of a place where the climate impacts are going to be much, much more dramatic than the residents understand.” He tells me about having lunch recently with the climate scientist Michael Oppenheimer, who’s a central figure in the IPCC. “He had been doing some advisory work with the City of New York about climate planning and I asked him at one point whether he thought that the city was going to build a sea wall to protect itself. He said that Manhattan is too rich to let drown, so we will build a sea wall. But the pace of that kind of infrastructure is so slow that if we started today, we would not be finished in time to save much of South Brooklyn and Queens. “The City knows this – you will start seeing, over the new few years, they will simply stop servicing the infrastructure of those neighbourhoods. They will stop repairing the subways, they will start telling the homeowners, possibly even explicitly, but first in some more subtle ways, that they may be able to live in their home until they die, but they will not be able to leave it to their children’. “That is part of one of the richest cities in the richest countries in the world, and we’re talking about within those city boundaries, possibly as many as a million people’s homes being lost. “That delusion, that we can avoid these impacts by living in modernity, in unnatural environments, is extremely pervasive.” Climate chance is going to transform our understanding of ourselves As he wrote in the article that kick-started his climate-sage status: “Not only are we going to be faced with catastrophic natural disasters, with having to engineer our way out of famine because our crops were going to be so much less productive, not only were we going to be dealing with likely more war, and more murder, and all of these absolutely horrifying narrowly understood climate impacts, but also all of that was going to transform everything about how we understood the relationship we had to the planet, to history, to our own future, to our politics, to our psychology, to what we expected from and blamed technology for, what we expected and blamed capitalism for.” The 2018 wildfires in California have made some Americans more aware of the potential effects of climate change (Photo: Getty) I pass him the milk, mind rather blown by the trim Manhattanite in a pastel V-neck telling me about the unprecedented suffering that is almost certainly going to happen in the coming decades because of climate change. How does he sleep at night, I ask. Has he changed the way he lives, gone vegan, perhaps, hyperaware as he is that we’re racing towards the destruction of the world as we know it? Would he prefer soya milk? Lifestyle changes are a drop in the ocean “Apart from air travel, it basically hasn’t changed my life. And that is probably in part because I’m still a relative newcomer to the subject.” (He also reveals that, despite his relatively recent dedication to the environment, that the polar bears’ plight leaves him cold. “People are moved when they see photos of polar bears on melting ice floes. I happen not to be one of those people. I don’t really care much about animals.”) “It’s likely that over the next few years I will be thinking harder about those choices. But I think that almost all of the lifestyle choices that we’re told to think about don’t make all that much difference compared to the difference that can be made politically. “Air travel is the one that really looms largest to me now, I feel really guilty when I get on a plane. The statistic that got to me most is one I read recently. A cross-country flight in the US is the equivalent of eight months of driving.” Plane travel is how the rich get around But he doesn’t see a move towards reducing our reliance on aviation being as popular as, say, going vegan. “Plane travel is the way that the rich get around the world. It’s the way that they do their business and as a result it hasn’t yet acquired this idea that ‘we’re going to be better than you by travelling less’. There’s been little political pressure on the carbon emissions of air travel, which is crazy. There should be major legislative energy around the world, forcing Boeing to manufacture electric planes rather than diesel-driven planes. Why is that not happening?” Air pollution is already claiming nine million lives each year. That number will grow as temperatures rise (Photo: Getty) If there are two clear messages that come through from Wallace-Wells’s work – other than if we continue like this, we’re doomed – is that our collective power as voters is vital and that only carbon capture on a global scale, plus negative emissions technologies, could result in “what we think of as a planet that is liveably close to our own”. An unlikely optimist Give his ability to turn up the dial on climate terror, he’s surprisingly optimistic about our chances. “Climate change is happening really fast in ways that are terrifying, but I really do feel like it is also empowering. The measure of the damage we’ve done is a measure of our power over the climate, which means we can do the reverse just as easily.” What are negative emissions? Negative emissions mean reducing the amount of carbon by capturing it, extracting it from the environment and storing it in a safe place. This is commonly known as carbon capture and storage (CCS) and scientists have been investigating the process for many years. Negative emissions technologies (Nets) are novel processes that aim to remove greenhouse gases from the atmosphere and hold them in long-term storage. Many Nets remove the CO2 from the atmosphere biologically through photosynthesis – the simplest example being afforestation, or planting more trees. Depending on the specific technique, the carbon removed from the atmosphere may end up in soils, vegetation, the ocean, deep geological formations, or even in rocks. But we have to put our backs into it, he adds. “Whenever you hear people talking about climate in a passive way, they’re really evading responsibility. Any individual person does not share all that much burden, all that much guilt, but collectively, this story is being written by us in real time, and if we write it towards disaster, that’s us writing it.” Bringing a child into a horrifying hellscape As the father of a baby daughter, he’s regularly asked what he thinks he’s playing at (or words to that effect), bringing a child into a world that, within her lifetime, will probably become a “horrifying hellscape”. “Part of it is delusion and compartmentalisation. But in general, just as a political principle, bigger than climate, I think you have to fight to make the world accommodate the kind of lives that you want to see unfold in it. “I think that having a child is an investment in a healthier future, but even if I didn’t have a child, I would still be really concerned about where the planet was going to be 50 years from now. “I want to have a child because in addition to being a climate writer, I’m a person! I don’t want to define our future so that it inhibits so many things that make us human.” ‘The Uninhabitable Earth: A Story of the Future’ (Penguin, £20) is published on 19 February Read more at: https://inews.co.uk/news/long-reads/climate-change-david-wallace-wells-uninhabitable-earth/

Read more at: https://inews.co.uk/news/long-reads/climate-change-david-wallace-wells-uninhabitable-earth/

Environment suffering multiple crises that threaten to destabilise society and global economy, experts warn

Thinktank warns ‘runaway crisis’ could lead to migration, famine and war comparable to 2008 financial crash

World leaders have failed to recognise the unprecedented “environmental breakdown” taking place across the world, a think tank has warned.
Climate change – along with mass extinctions, soil erosion and pollution – represent enormous dangers that threaten the stability of societies and economies across the globe.

The predicted “runaway collapse”, including financial instability, involuntary migration, conflict and famine, is comparable to the 2008 financial crisis, according to the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR).

In a new report issued by the group, the authors warn that the disregard shown for these issues by nations has been a “catastrophic mistake”.

“Our research shows how urgent it is that we understand and address a much wider range of environmental issues than climate change alone,” said Laurie Laybourn-Langton, lead author of the report.

In a new report issued by the group, the authors warn that the disregard shown for these issues by nations has been a “catastrophic mistake”.

“Our research shows how urgent it is that we understand and address a much wider range of environmental issues than climate change alone,” said Laurie Laybourn-Langton, lead author of the report.

“Overall, the environment is breaking down, with consequences which include more drought, famine, forced migration and war.

“Environmental breakdown poses a catastrophic risk. This is a crisis.”
In the UK, “one of the most nature-depleted countries in the world”, populations of the most threatened species have fallen by two-thirds on average since 1970.

Some 2 million tons of topsoil is eroded annually and nearly 85 per cent of fertile peat soil in East Anglia has gone since 1850, with the rest at risk of being lost in the next 30 to 60 years.
Politicians and officials need to understand the scale and pace of environmental breakdown, the implications for societies, and the need for large-scale transformation to tackle the crisis, the researchers said.
The report also warned that countries like the UK needed to start planning for the impacts of changes that are already set to occur, for example as a result of rising global temperatures.

Natural systems are being damaged by phosphorus and nitrogen runoff from farming, and pollution from various sources such as vehicle emissions and plastic waste is also causing problems, the report adds.

“This is a crisis particularly for millennial and younger generations – the leaders of tomorrow,” said Lesley Rankin, a researcher at IPPR.
“They face the daunting twin tasks of preventing environmental breakdown while responding to its growing negative effects and the failure to stop the damage sooner.”
The report also points to the shrinking hole in the ozone layer and the rollout of clean technologies as rare examples of successful action to avert catastrophe.

Support free-thinking journalism and subscribe to Independent Minds
“We need to move from these isolated successes to a transformation to make our societies and economies sustainable, just and prepared,” said Ms Rankin.
Responding to the findings, co-leader of the Green Party Jonathan Bartley said the UK government “desperately need to find the political will to take the bold steps so urgently needed”.
“This report is clear – the impact of human activity on our climate is utterly destructive, and it will have serious political and economic implications,” he said.
“There still is an opportunity to build a fairer and more sustainable future, but that window is closing fast.”

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