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I am scared of dying from Ayahuasca… dying from fucking laughter! (SERIOUSLY!)… people are just not grasping GUTCP and hydrino are they?… AT ALL! :’D

I think some people may get their wish… they may actually kill Danny Hurley! 😀 You’re absolute stupidity and ignorance may actually kill me off from laughter the next time I drink Ayahuasca!
Seriously… there’s been a few Ayahuasca ceremonies where I thought I was going to laugh myself to death… six hours of uncontrollable laughter, I was in agony the next day… … now I am worried I might actually finally do it!

Death of Brit highlights the danger of Amazonian psychedelic brew
A man from the UK is believed to have died from the dangerous psychedelic drug Ayahuasca. Witnesses said he was laughing uncontrollably, gasping out for air, screamed out “Quantum Physics! You fucking morons!”, before expiring.
The death is being treated as unexplained.

I don’t know what to say anymore… I honestly don’t.

If I was given a choice between saving six and half billion people, and this collection of books… you do realise what choice I’m making don’t you! 😀

ai

 

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Field searched in possible link to Linda Razzell murder finds nothing… the use of LIDAR in locating unmarked graves, Using GIS to Find Hidden Graves Based on Killers’ Preferences, Searching for clandestine graves with geophysical tools

“What about the use of LIDAR  technology in locating ‘clandestine’ or unmarked graves? Not just in regards to killer Christopher Halliwell (Linda Razell and other murder victims)… but more recent cases of missing women? Where hundreds of police officers where drafted in to scour fields… … I’m not saying replace them, but it is an extra tool in searching for a potential unmarked grave… essentially it’s a needle in haystack.
The technology has been used in the US… it’s been used in finding graves in Bosnia (Serbia/Croatia)… Holocaust victims… shit it can be used to find medieval graves!”

“The reason I use pigs!”
“Fuck sake man!”

Field searched in possible link to Linda Razzell murder finds nothing

A police search of a field near where a woman went missing 17 years ago has found nothing.
Wiltshire Police said they were keeping an open mind when asked if the search was connected to the disappearance of mother of four Linda Razzell, in 2002.
Mrs Razzell was last seen on her way to work in Swindon and the 41-year-old’s body has never been found.
A search of a site near Pentylands Lane in Highworth led to “no items of interest” being found.
During the search, which took place over the weekend and earlier this week, officers made clear they were not linking the search to a specific case.
Det Supt Jeremy Carter said officers with sniffer dogs began work in a small area of the park last Friday, after information was received from a member of the public.
“This information was passed to us from a concerned dog walker in good faith and was acted upon appropriately and thoroughly,” he said.
“We have meticulously searched this area and concluded that nothing of interest is located there.”

Mrs Razzell went missing after setting off from her Highworth home to work at Swindon College.
Despite her body never being found, her husband Glyn was jailed for life in 2003, a conviction he failed to overturn in 2005.
He claimed DNA evidence against him – drops of her blood found in the boot of a car he had access to – was unreliable.
Former police detective Steve Fulcher later suggested double murderer Christopher Halliwell could have been involved with Mrs Razzell’s disappearance.
Halliwell was jailed in 2016 for the 2003 murder of Becky Godden, having already been convicted of killing Sian O’Callaghan in 2011.

LIDAR Could Detect Clandestine Graves

Clandestine graves, often placed in remote locations and further hidden with brush, present a forensic riddle that has proven to defy easy answers.
LIDAR, or the use of light in a radar-liked platform, can show minute changes in elevations for burial mounds, according to the recent study by personnel from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee’s “Body Farm,” published in the journal Forensic Science International.
The graves initially show higher elevation, which lowers by soil settling and decomposition, before settling down to uniform elevation change, according to the paper.
“Our study is the first to quantify the differences in elevation and demonstrates the future potential benefit of incorporating terrestrial LIDAR into existing data-collection approaches to locate unmarked graves,” said Katie Corcoran, lead author, of Oak Ridge.
Four pits were dug in mid-February 2013 at the Body Farm. One grave was a control, without remains, according to the study. But the others had corpses: one had six bodies, another had three, and one contained a single set of remains. Some of the bodies had partial clothing, were partially bound with ligatures, and were buried in the backfilled soil with bullet casing, keys, gloves and other items that could be associated with violent crime evidence.
The graves were all shallow, with the topmost body of each resting just 10 to 15 centimeters below the soil surface.
The 3D data points were collected using a tripod-mounted Reigel VZ-400 terrestrial laser scanner.
They started off with a pre-burial universal reference scan, taken just days before the graves were dug. The other 3D images were captured immediately after the burials, 108 days after interment, and approximately 21 months (643 days) after the burial.
The 3D point data produced data down to 5-cm pixel resolution.
The changes were wrought because of some dynamics of human death and burial, write the investigators. First digging a grave loosens compacted soil—and when it is returned to the pit, it occupies more volume and space, they write. The body also occupies space, making the mound slightly higher than the initial soil surface, they add. But the soil gradually is compacted down, and the body gradually decays—decreasing the height of the mound.
The study had the initial reference points to show dynamics—which may not be available in remote locations. But the possibility of identifying changes in a landscape suspected of harboring unidentified graves means the forensic applications of LIDAR have yet to be fully explored, add the authors.
“Localized elevation change in a landscape—particularly if it follows the direction trends observed in this study—is a strong sign of disturbance,” write the scientists. “Elevation change detection data my complement other burial detection methods in the field, such as pedestrian survey, soil probing, or ground-based geophysical technologies.”
Indeed, LIDAR featured prominently in a recent archaeological excavation at the Holocaust site of Treblinka in Poland, led by British scientists.
Clandestine graves have also been subject to location tests using drones and near-infrared photos, as reported last month in Forensic Magazine—and also advanced GIS systems narrowing down the preference for criminals trying to hide the most incriminating evidence of all.

Using LIDAR to find unmarked graves of murder victims

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. reports that LIDAR can be used to find the unmarked graves of murder victims. In their paper published in the journal Forensic Science International, the group describes the technique and how well it worked.

Oftentimes, a murderer will seek to hide the body to avoid being caught and imprisoned. One well-known method of victim hiding is simply to bury the body in a remote location. This approach has proven effective in the long run, as nature will eventually hide evidence of digging—but not all of the evidence, it seems. The researchers in this new effort noted that when a body is buried, it takes up a certain amount of room beneath the ground. But as the body decays, it takes up less room, causing the dirt above to settle. This slight bit of settling can look like a depression on the surface of the ground to the observant eye—though less so when covered by debris such as scattered leaves.
The researchers noted that LIDAR has proven to be quite effective at mapping terrain—one example was its use in uncovering hidden Mayan ruins in the Amazon. LIDAR is an acronym of the words “light” and “radar.” It is used in the same way as radar—light beams, in the form of laser blasts, are fired at the ground, and a sensor reads how much light is bounced back. Improvements over time have led to LIDAR systems that can detect changes in ground texture to the centimeter.
Because of its accuracy, the researchers wondered whether LIDAR could be used to find unmarked graves. They obtained several corpses that had been donated to science and buried them in several unmarked graves. Some of the graves held just one body, others held more, and of course, one held none to serve as a control. The researchers then flew over the graves in a helicopter periodically for almost two years and monitored the ground using LIDAR. They report that they were able to make out the outlines of all of the graves—even those that were covered by leaves and other debris.
Explore further: Searching for clandestine graves with geophysical tools
More information: K.A. Corcoran et al. A novel application of terrestrial LIDAR to characterize elevation change at human grave surfaces in support of narrowing down possible unmarked grave locations, Forensic Science International (2018). DOI: 10.1016/j.forsciint.2018.05.038
Abstract
Unmarked graves are difficult to locate once the ground surface no longer shows visible evidence of disturbance, posing significant challenges to missing person investigations. This research evaluates the use of terrestrial LIDAR point data for measuring localized elevation change at human grave surfaces. Three differently sized human graves, one control-pit, and surrounding undisturbed ground, were scanned four times between February 2013 and November 2014 using a tripod-mounted terrestrial laser scanner. All the disturbed surfaces exhibited measurable and localized elevation change, allowing for separation of disturbed and undisturbed ground. This study is the first to quantify elevation changes to human graves over time and demonstrates that terrestrial LIDAR may contribute to multi-modal data collection approach to improve unmarked grave detection.

Searching for clandestine graves with geophysical tools

It’s very hard to convict a murderer if the victim’s body can’t be found. And the best way to hide a body is to bury it. Developing new tools to find those clandestine graves is the goal of a small community of researchers spread across several countries, some of whom are presenting their work on Tuesday, May 14, at the Meeting of the Americas in Cancún, Mexico, a scientific conference organized and co-sponsored by the American Geophysical Union.

“Nowadays, there are thousands of missing people around the world that could have been tortured and killed and buried in clandestine graves,” said Jamie Pringle, lecturer in geoscience at the School of Physical Sciences and Geography at Keele University in the U.K. “This is a huge problem for their families and governments that are responsible for the human rights for everybody. These people need to be found and the related crime cases need to be resolved.”
Mostly, people throw resources at the search for clandestine graves and try to see what works best, said Pringle. But he and his colleagues Carlos Molina and Orlando Hernandez of the National University of Colombia in Bogota are among those trying to refine the techniques for finding mass graves, so that eventually there might be a reliable toolkit for not only finding bodies, but discovering details like the time of deaths and burials–-all critical evidence for convicting murderers.
Previous studies on which Pringle has worked have involved simulated clandestine graves in the U.K. in which they buried pigs and then monitored soil gases, fluids and other physical changes over time. That research made it clear how much the detection of graves depends on understanding how corpses change in different soils and climates. This is being applied to active forensic cases throughout Europe.
International collaborations among forensic geophysicists have already proved helpful in cases such as the so-called IRA ‘Disappeared’ victims found on beaches in Northern Ireland and current work underway to detect Civil War mass graves in Spain.
In the latest project, being presented in a poster at the Cancún meeting, the researchers propose to bury pigs in eight different simulated clandestine mass grave scenarios in different soils and climates in Colombia. Then they will study the mass graves with geophysical methods like ground penetrating radar, electrical resistivity, conductivity and magnetometry among others. Their plan is to survey the graves every eight days during the first month, 15 days in the second and third months, and monthly until 18 months have passed.
The data they collect will be used to map the mass graves and compare them, adjusting for site variables like soil type and rainfall. They also expect to compare their results with other studies and forensic cases.
“The project’s integrated geophysical survey results will support the search for mass graves and thus help find missing people, bring perpetrators to justice and provide closure for families,” said Molina.
Explore further: Sex is ‘nothing but trouble’, geneticist says
More information: The research team on this clandestine graves project will present a poster about their work on Tuesday morning, 14 May 2013, at the Meeting of the Americas.
Experiments to detect clandestine graves from interpreted high resolution geophysical anomalies
ABSTRACT
This project refers to the search for clandestine sites where possibly missing people have been buried based on interpreted near surface high resolution geophysical anomalies. Nowadays, there are thousands of missing people around the world that could have been tortured and killed and buried in clandestine graves. This is a huge problem for their families and governments that are responsible to warranty the human rights for everybody. These people need to be found and the related crime cases need to be resolved. This work proposes to construct a series of graves where all the conditions of the grave, human remains and related objects are known. It is expected to detect contrasting physical properties of soil to identify the known human remains and objects. The proposed geophysical methods will include electrical tomography, magnetic and ground penetrating radar, among others. Two geographical sites will be selected to located and build standard graves with contrasting weather, soil, vegetation, geographic and geologic conditions. Forward and inverse modeling will be applied to locate and enhance the geophysical response of the known graves and to validate the methodology. As a result, an integrated geophysical program will be provided to support the search for clandestine graves helping to find missing people that have been illegally buried. Optionally, the methodology will be tested to search for real clandestine graves.

A novel application of terrestrial LIDAR to characterize elevation change at human grave surfaces in support of narrowing down possible unmarked grave locations

Highlights
• Elevation change is observable at disturbed surfaces, and bears unique qualities.
• Elevation change bearing the same qualities is not observed at undisturbed surfaces.
• Unique qualities include a quantitative and predictable directional pattern.
• Soil disturbance results in elevation gain, followed by elevation loss, then stasis.
• This study observed surface elevation activity for up to four months post-burial.
Abstract
Unmarked graves are difficult to locate once the ground surface no longer shows visible evidence of disturbance, posing significant challenges to missing person investigations. This research evaluates the use of terrestrial LIDAR point data for measuring localized elevation change at human grave surfaces. Three differently sized human graves, one control-pit, and surrounding undisturbed ground, were scanned four times between February 2013 and November 2014 using a tripod-mounted terrestrial laser scanner. All the disturbed surfaces exhibited measurable and localized elevation change, allowing for separation of disturbed and undisturbed ground. This study is the first to quantify elevation changes to human graves over time and demonstrates that terrestrial LIDAR may contribute to multi-modal data collection approach to improve unmarked grave detection.

Searching for clandestine graves with geophysical tools

Killers have a race against the clock to hide the remains of their victims. They have to find a place off major roads, with ground relatively easy to dig—a spot quick to access and escape from, and one that is not likely to be seen from above.
The search for clandestine graves in open terrain means investigators have very little go on to determine where certain killers may have concealed their victims. For decades some agencies have used the “traffic-light system” (Red-Amber-Green, or RAG, system) by which the areas that may be of most interest to searchers are color-coded on a map, with red being the best hiding spots for remains.
Now an Italian team has refined a method of incorporating yet more desired factors into a GIS system, which could narrow searches further based on whether graves were dug during the day or at night—and find the most crucial evidence of all in homicides, they report in the Journal of Forensic Sciences.
“In contrast to previous studies, a new GIS-based method, based on cross-referenced RAG maps in order to evaluate ‘cumulative’ suitability to host a burial, was reported,” the scientists write. “The goal of this technical note was to thoroughly illustrate this innovative GIS-based presearch method for demonstrating that it can assist investigators as well as canine scent detections team(s) with better management of efforts, resources, and time during recent clandestine grave ground searches.”
The seven factors that went into their RAG mapping were: the search area access and exit prospects; the “diggability” of the ground; the slope of the landscape; the sparseness of the vegetation; the absence or presence of human-made structures; the stability of the geomorphology of the area; and the potential visibility of the act of digging at the locations, they report.
Favored by far were soil that was soft and with easy “diggability,” less than 20 degrees of slope, a spot devoid of both vegetation and human structures, stable ground not affected by water, and locations not visible by other people, they explain.
The team, led by Roberta Somma of Università degli Studi di Messina, then tested their methodology with “blind” tests.
At two sites in northeastern Sicily, “killers” buried two mannequins at simulated crime scenes far from prying eyes: one in an area cultivated with olive trees, and another in a sheltered area near a lake.
Nine students searched for the bodies.
At the olive grove near Ali, the “body” was buried in August 2015, and the search started six weeks later. The searchers were given a 40-square-kilometer search area. Using the digital surface models (DSMs), the red areas of most interest narrowed the landscape to about 5 percent of the total area.
At the rural area near the lake in Messina, the “body” was buried in May 2017, and sought by the student team about six weeks later, with a given search area of about 16 square kilometers. The red area using their method focused searches on about 2 percent of the terrain.
Both bodies were found within the area defined as red by the DSMs (which accounts for more suitability factors). At the olive grove, the mannequin was found in about an hour. Near the lake, it was located in approximately three hours.
The DSMs were more effective in scoring the map areas and guiding the search party, they write, because the additional factors account for more careful daylight burials, they write.
“If the culprit conceals the body in daylight and worries about the possibility of being seen by eyewitnesses, then the DSM scenario will be the most appropriate,” they write. “Nevertheless, at both crime scenes, the time spent for the ground search is an outstanding result because without the application of this method it would have been impossible to spot the clandestine graves in such as a short time, giving the specific features of the territory.”
Searches for clandestine graves have always been a major hurdle for detectives in the hunt for killers trying to cover their tracks. The textbook Practical Homicide Investigation by Vernon Geberth suggests considering the nature of the killing, whether it took place in a different location, and then using a series of tools to narrow down a search area, including aircraft searches, thermal infrared thermography, ground-penetrating radar, trained cadaver dogs, search by foot, probing with a steel rod, and use of a vapor detector to determine decomposition gases from a corpse.

A Characterization of Human Burial Signatures using Spectroscopy and LIDAR

Abstract
This study is an analysis of terrestrial remote sensing data sets collected at the University of Tennessee’s Anthropology Research Facility (ARF). The objective is to characterize human burial signatures using spectroscopy and laser scanning technologies. The development of remote human burial detection methodologies depends on basic research to establish signatures that inform forensic investigations. This dissertation provides recommendations for future research on remote sensing of human burials, and for investigators who wish to apply these technologies to case work.
Data used in this study include terrestrial spectra, aerial hyperspectral imagery, satellite multispectral imagery, terrestrial light detection and ranging (LIDAR), and aerial LIDAR. In February 2013, ten individuals donated through the Forensic Anthropology Center body donation program were buried in three differently sized graves at the ARF. The graves contain one, three, and six bodies, respectively. An empty experimental control grave was also created. Terrestrial data collections were made from two-days pre-burial to 21-months post-burial. Aerial data were collected from 19 to 27-months post-burial. Satellite imagery was collected from six-months pre-burial to 23-months post-burial. Analytical emphasis is placed on the terrestrial data sets, which are of the highest spatial and spectral fidelity. Results of terrestrial data analysis reveal separable spectral and topographic signatures between the disturbed locations and surrounding undisturbed area. Aerial and satellite data were used to attempt validation of terrestrial data analysis findings, but findings were inconclusive.
This study demonstrates that live vegetation spectral samples can be correctly classified as disturbed or undisturbed groups at rates from 52.0 – 78.3% using statistically-based classification models. Additionally, this study documents localized elevation change at burial surfaces as a result of initial digging activity, subsequent soil settling and subsurface decomposition. The findings of this research are significant to both researchers and practitioners. It is the first study to compare live vegetation spectra associated with human burials and is the first to document burial elevation change using LIDAR. This work contributes to a collective understanding of human burial signatures that can be used together or with other geophysical methods to assist in locating unmarked human burials.

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Power determination and hydrino product characterization of ultra-low field ignition of hydrated silver shots – Mills – Lu – Frazer – “One of the most important papers in science history, yet virtually no one is paying attention.”

“One of the most important papers in science history, yet virtually no one is paying attention.”

… some guy on Twitter (Alex Combs… has a picture of Archer! :D)
Even more important considering it’s in the Chinese Journal of Physics! 😀

chin

Power determination and hydrino product characterization of ultra-low field ignition of hydrated silver shots – R.Mills, Y.Lu, R.Frazer

http://www.brettholverstott.com/
https://brilliantlightpower.com/
http://philosophystorm.org/koroeda
http://zhydrogen.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/BLP-e-4-25-2016.pdf

https://www.infinite-energy.com/iemagazine/issue130/WallIE130.pdf
https://www.infinite-energy.com/iemagazine/issue131/WallIE131Part2.pdf
http://www.infinite-energy.com/iemagazine/issue142/WallIE142.pdf
http://www.blacklightpower.com/wp-content/uploads/pdf/Natutech.nl_Article.pdf
https://vimeo.com/user26477140/videos

http://webcast.massey.ac.nz/Mediasite/Play/8ef7e03e26fc458b8eb7f351738f26811d
https://www.millsian.com/
https://fcnp.com/2018/08/17/great-energy-transition-fires-floods-fossil-fuels-new-energy/
https://www.villagevoice.com/tag/randell-mills/
https://www.infinite-energy.com/images/pdfs/RosenblumIE17.pdf
http://www.cheniere.org/misc/mills.htm

https://cen.acs.org/articles/94/i44/Cold-fusion-died-25-years.html
https://cognitivecarbonspot.wordpress.com/
https://www.lenr-forum.com/forum/thread/4510-validation-of-randell-mills-gutcp-a-call-for-action/

http://pubs.acs.org/subscribe/archive/ci/31/i10/html/10vp.html
https://www.researchgate.net/topic/hydrino
View story at Medium.com

https://fcnp.com/2018/12/20/great-transition-progress-new-sources-energy/
https://www.reddit.com/r/BrilliantLightPower/
Other inventions/patents from Dr Randell Mills ranging from genetic sequencing to selective drug delivery to Resonant magnetic susceptibility imagine (ReMSI)… the guys a genius!…

https://www.google.com/search?q=randell+mills

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Killer’s ‘significant link’ as cops dig for Razzell body (Christopher Halliwell)

“My interest?… well… it was trying to ensure UK police forces are equipped, trained and briefed on how to prevent a single person travelling around the country murdering up to thirty women (more?) over a period of decades… … but I’m not to sure whether I give a fucking shit anymore”

Killer’s ‘significant link’ as cops dig for Razzell body

A DOUBLE murderer who became ‘obsessed’ with mother-of-four Linda Razzell could hold the key to her disappearance 17 years ago, it is claimed.
It comes as police acting on a tip-off continued digging a Wiltshire field close to where Mrs Razzell was last seen.

Christopher Halliwell is serving life for murdering Sian O’Callaghan, 22, whose body was found in a shallow grave in Oxfordshire in 2011. Yesterday Peter Shawe, the ex-partner of Ms O’Callaghan’s mother, Elaine, said suggestions that Halliwell carried out building work at the Razzells’ house before she vanished are ‘significant’.
Mr Shawe, 57, said he thought ‘flimsy evidence’ was used to convict Glyn Razzell, who is serving life for his wife’s murder in 2002 — a crime Razzell insists he did not commit. Halliwell, who also stabbed and strangled Becky Godden, 20, in 2003, could have more victims, said Mr Shawe. ‘You are not going from Becky to Sian in that time without committing other murders,’ he said.

serial-killer-christopher-halliwell-melanie-hall-murder-bath-1526271
Double murderer: Halliwell

Sandy Jonsson, a friend of Halliwell’s ex-wife, has claimed that Halliwell did building work for the Razzells in 1998 and became besotted with Mrs Razzell.

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Israel – Quantum Budgets – What is the Goal?

“I’m hoping… the goal is to watch the US and China… (Russia, EU, South Korea)… completely fail miserably in terms of ‘Quantum’, ploughing billions of dollars, their countries resources and their brightest and best minds into a theory that is completely wrong 🙂 … … if I’m being honest!” 😀

I’m hoping Israel is allocating resources (within Mossad and elsewhere) to ‘stealing the fuck’ out of this technology, and Israel’s best and brightest minds are already working with GUTCP in fields such as defence, medicine, etc… … if I’m being completely honest! 😀

Quantum Budgets – What is the Goal?

The field of quantum technology is not new, it has been studied by Physics scientist for decades. Today we are in the midst of the second quantum revolution, a quantum-ready situation that within the next decade will reflect the real commercial value of the technology, according to IBM.
The quantum computer’s smallest unit is the qubit. While current computers are based on the binary one and zero sequence, the quantum bit can be one and zero at the same time. A quantum computer comprises of many qubits tied together by quantum entanglement.
A large number of qubits will create a huge sequence of one’s and zero’s which will enable much faster and complex calculations compared to current computers.
The quantum computer will revolutionize fields such as machine learning and big data, that require intense processing capabilities.
The quantum technology has many applications in the security and defense fields:
Quantum computers – Encryption, cybersecurity/password deciphering, critical communication and command & control security, data processing.
Quantum technologies – Detectors, sensitive quantum sensors, radars, laser, electro-optics, batteries, quantum clocks at the heart of communication and navigation security systems, detection and defense.
Israel sees this field as the next big thing after the cyber revolution, and the Israeli quantum program was announced by PM Netanyahu during the May 2018 international conference of science ministers. But is Israel allocating enough resources for this purpose?
In the US, President Trump signed on the national quantum initiative in December 2018, based on a $1.25 billion for quantum computers activities until 2023. These will include manpower instruction, storage, handling information, etc.
China poses a tough competition for the US, with its development of a huge research lab based on a $10 billion investment. The European Union will invest in quantum computing 1.3 billion Euro (about $1.5 billion).
In Israel, the Ministry of Defense and the Israel Science Foundation have recently allocated a five-year fund of NIS 100 million ($27 million) for research and the development of scientific infrastructure. The grants will refer to quantum computing, communication, simulation, sensors such as atomic clocks, magnetic field measuring, etc.
The question is will this investment be sufficient for the creation of an adequate national infrastructure which will enable Israel to make the quantum leap as it did regarding the cyber field in the past.