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UK nursery worker named youngest female ‘paedophile’… Women as child sex child offenders (often nursery workers)… 64,000?

I’m just absolutely fascinated by the whole phenomena of child sex abuse. The only reason I came to investigate such crimes was because of MI5 and their cover-ups of historic child sex abuse (if it wasn’t for that, I would never have taken an interest)

I’m fascinated by the difference between a paedophile and a child abuser (‘not every paedophile is a child abuser, and not every child abuser is a paedophile’).
I’m fascinated as to why adults choose to engage in this behaviour (in many different forms)… I’m fascinated by the recent increase of this crime in the UK (described by some now as an ‘epidemic’)… more than anything, I’m fascinated by the British publics response to it! 

I am now being gang-stalked by what I can only describe as a group of (sometimes known and convicted) paedophiles, child abusers… and the police are fully aware of it! Shit load of people know! 

I’m just fascinated how the United Kingdom is continuing to bury it’s head in the sand regarding this… forget Brexit, and politics, and whatever else… if the UK can’t ensure large portions of it’s adult population are not engaging in predatory sexual behaviour with children… it is quite simply a failed society! 😀 (no two fucking ways about it). Society needs a completely different approach to combating this… and the UK will not dare admit it has a problem (Why?)

What’s being brought up now is the rise in women who are paedophiles/child sex abusers… Britain’s ‘worse’ convicted female paedophile was a nursery worker… Britain’s youngest convicted paedophile was a nursery worker… there’s been other cases of female nursery workers… quite obviously female paedophiles may be using the profession to get access to young children. (YOUNG CHILDREN)

What sort of studies have been done on female paedophilia/child sex abusers?
What are the main difference between male and female offenders?
What are the statistics?
Is it on the rise?

Teenage nursery worker who sexually abused children as young as two jailed

Abuser was 17 when she committed offences against victims aged two and three

Elms had undergone safeguarding training as part of her college course, and used “sustained and extensive” planning to gain access to children, the judge said.

Nursery worker Vanessa George: women and child sex abuse

Child sex abuse by women may be more widespread than people realise, according to experts, following the case of nursery worker Vanessa George, from Plymouth, Devon.

Because of the position of trust they hold, it is thought that many cases go unreported.
And the psychological damage it does to their victims can be even more severe.
The Child Exploitation and Online Protection (CEOP) centre, which assisted detectives investigating the abuse by Vanessa George, Angela Allen and Colin Blanchard, has commissioned studies into the behaviour of female sex predators.

Staff at CEOP said female sex offending is perceived as rarer and therefore more shocking than male sex offending.
A spokeswoman said: “It’s very difficult for us as a society to accept that women can be capable of those crimes and be sexually motivated to commit them.

“The way we think of women as carers of children, it’s hard to conceive they could be capable of treating children that way.”
The spokeswoman said the number of female offenders was difficult to quantify, but “more and more” were being identified due to raised awareness of sexual offending and the training offered by agencies, including CEOP.
“This does mean the number of female offenders is therefore likely to increase,” she said.
“It’s accepted that sexual abuse is under-reported. Children rarely come forward and disclose sexual abuse – even if it’s uncovered. Children rarely discuss their experiences.
“But with female perpetrators that under-reporting is even greater.
“Women are afforded a greater position of trust and children are asking themselves ‘am I going to be believed if I come forward?’ or ‘is this going to make it worse for me?’.”
The spokeswoman said some studies have suggested the percentage of female sex offenders could be as high as 20%.
But differences between male and female offenders have been identified, she said.
“Women use the internet differently. We don’t see a high volume of image collection on women’s computers, as we do on male offenders’.
“Women use the internet to network and talk on forums online about their offending.”
The impact a female offender has on a child can be even greater than the devastating influence of a male offender, the spokeswoman said.
She said: “The impact abuse has on the way children form attachments to others can be so destructive.
“It’s hugely destructive anyway, but it has a particular impact when that perpetrator is a woman.”

Up to 64,000 women in UK ‘are child-sex offenders’

After Plymouth case shocked the nation, police say number of women abusing children is rising

Child sex abuse by women is significantly more widespread than previously realised, with experts estimating that there could be up to 64,000 female offenders in Britain.
Researchers from the Lucy Faithfull Foundation (LFF), a child protection charity that deals with British female sex offenders, said its studies confirmed that a “fair proportion” of child abusers were women. Donald Findlater, director of research and development, said results indicated that up to 20% of a conservative estimate of 320,000 suspected UK paedophiles were women.
The release of the figures comes days after a Plymouth nursery school worker, Vanessa George – together with Angela Allen from Nottingham and Colin Blanchard from Rochdale – pleaded guilty to sexually abusing young children.

Last night George’s husband appealed to her to identify her victims, whom she has so far refused to name. Andrew George, 41, said: “I would plead to her, tell those parents, all those parents who want to know.

“If Vanessa has got any shred of human decency in her she should tell those parents.” At her trial, Mr Justice John Royce had urged her to tell police the names of her victims.
Findlater said: “There was some suggestion it was only blokes that sexually abused children. Over time those arguments have fallen aside and people have had to wake up to the fact that actually, sadly, there is a fair proportion of women abusing as well.”
There are 32,000 names on the sex offenders register. But LFF researchers suggest that the real number of paedophiles is 10 times this figure. Provisional studies suggest that between 5% and 20% are women.
The calculations put the number of female child-sex offenders in the UK at between 48,000 and 64,000, a figure Findlater describes as “highly possible”. He said: “The problem is far bigger than conviction rates and, if you look at survivor studies, you end up with a very different story about the scale of the problem of female sexual abuse.”

Detectives at Scotland Yard’s paedophile unit, meanwhile, disclosed that they had detected an “increased prevalence” of female offenders. Metropolitan police sources said that quantifying the number of paedophiles in the UK was problematic, but there were likely to be hundreds of thousands.
Steve Lowe, director of Phoenix Forensic Consultants, which treats and assesses child sex abusers, said the true number of female paedophiles has remained hidden for too long.
“As a society, we find women sex offenders difficult to acknowledge. But those of us who work with paedophiles have seen evidence that women are capable of terrible crimes against children – just as bad as men.” He said some female abusers remained hidden because they appeared before the family courts, where their cases were not publicised because of reporting restrictions.
The latest government figures, published six months ago, showed that 56 female child sex abusers were in custody, with 49 sentenced and seven on remand. Another 84 were under supervision in the community. Fewer than 2% of people on the sex offenders register are women.
Officials at the government’s Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP) said under-reporting of incidents involving female abusers was a concern and warned that “copycat” abusers may attempt to replicate the abuse that took place at Plymouth’s Little Ted’s nursery, where George worked.
George, Allen and Blanchard, all 39, met through the networking site Facebook. Officials at the CEOP and at Scotland Yard believe that the internet is driving an increase in the number of sex abusers of children. However, while offences are on the rise, police say that they have detected no changes in the patterns of abuse that are carried out by paedophiles, whether men or women.

Female paedophiles: Why women sexually abuse children

As a woman is jailed for her part in running a ‘depraved’ child sex abuse ring, Radhika Sanghani speaks to experts about what motivates female abusers

Marie Black, 34, has been sexually abusing children for the last 10 years.
She was at the centre of an “utterly depraved” sex abuse ring where two boys and three girls – all aged under 13 – were raped and abused.
Black organised sex parties where children were ‘raffled’ to people who would then rape and abuse them.
A judge, who jailed her for life, said it was ‘the most harrowing case’ he’d ever seen.
“The children were subjected to sexual abuse of the worst kind,” he said. “They were simply passed around like toys.”

Black was jailed along with two men who were also part of the sex abuse ring: Michael Rogers, 46, and Jason Adams, 44, as well as Carol Stadler, 59, who was found guilty of assault causing actual bodily harm.
But while the men were respectively found guilty of 14 and 13 counts, including rape, (Stadler was clearled of nine other charges bar the assault), Black was found guilty of 23 offences.
It’s why she is now being labelled as the ‘mistress’ of the gang.
This has shocked many. Sadly paedophilia and sex abuse rings are rarely out of the headlines, but a female ringleader who has sexually abused children is more unusual.

We find female sex offenders abhorrent
Forensic psychologist Nina Burrowes says the gender of female abusers often accounts for some of our shock: “I do generally believe [women sexually abusing children] happens less often than men, but it happens a lot more often than you realise. I suspect it’s much more underreported.”
She suggests that society has not been willing to learn more about female paedophilia (where adults are sexually attracted to children) and female child sex abuse (where they either act on those impulses and sexually abuse children, or do it for different reasons).
“We find it abhorrent because it challenges our ideas of women and motherhood,” she explains. “We also find it frightening because we like to live with the idea that men are dangerous and women are safe, so when you see children to a male stranger in the park it’s dangerous but if they’re talking to a woman it isn’t.
“Most women are motivated by an intimacy need. They want to feel close to someone.”
Franca Cortini

“Female sex offenders challenge those notions, which is why a lot of people struggle to believe these things.”
Yet women are paedophiles and child sex abusers. Franca Cortoni, professor of criminology at the University of Montreal, has written extensively on female sex offenders and tells me that though there is an overlap in the way male and female child abusers think, there can be specific motivations for women to offend.
“We do know there are women who are motivated by sexual interest in children but they are only a tiny proportion of female sex offenders,” she explains. “Most women are motivated by an intimacy need. They want to feel close to someone.”
Some of those women will choose an adolescent victim – such as recent cases of teachers having sex with teenage boys and grooming them. “These women are more into the idea of a relationship,” explains Cortoni. “They just choose an adolescent instead of an adult partner because they’re less threatening, and they can be in charge.”

Women offending with male partners
But when it comes to women who chooses a prepubescent child as their victim, she says: “I think they have a different type of need. It’s no longer that relationship need. They want to feel close to someone who can’t reciprocate in that context. They want to feel totally in charge.”
Another key difference between male and female sex offenders is that a third of women do it alongside someone else – typically a male partner.
This is a common feature in the most high-profile cases of female offenders, such as Rosemary West, who helped her husband Fred to rape, torture and murder children and women, and Myra Hindley, who murdered and sexually assaulted five children alongside Ian Brady.

It’s also a crucial part in the Black case, where her two former partners were part of the sex abuse ring.
Cortoni says: “There’s definitely a very tiny indication that for some of these women, it’s because they’ve been coerced. That doesn’t mean physical violence. It could be very much emotional or psychological. They’re akin to women who are victims of domestic violence.”
This was part of Black’s defence from her lawyers, who said she had suffered domestic violence at the hands of Adams and that he “was a very manipulative” man who exploited her. But barristers representing Adams and Rogers rejected this notion saying: “She is the common denominator between all the offences.”

Male coercion of female abusers
But there have been cases where this coercion is clearer. Paedophile and former Lostprophets singer Ian Watkins was jailed in 2013 for child sex offences including the attempted rape of a baby. But as well as committing the crimes himself, he also encouraged a female fan to abuse her child during a webcam chat, as well as enticing another to join him on his paedophilic mission.
The judge sentencing him at the time, Mr Justice Royce, said: “You had many fawning fans. That gave you power. You knew you could use that power to induce young female fans to help satisfy your insatiable lust and take part in the sexual abuse of their own children.”

Cortoni explains more about these kinds of female sex offenders: “They’ll do whatever he says in that context because they lose who they are. Some believe it will bring them closer to their partner. Often it’s to do with their own background and whatever happened when they were raised.
“People think they’re mentally ill but they’re not always. I prefer to say they’re predominantly dysfunctional.”

Serial sex offenders
While some of the most high-profile cases of female sex offenders show them committing repeated crimes against children, such as Black and West, it isn’t a typical pattern. Instead Cortoni explains that serial female child abusers are rare:
“The make-up of women is different to men. I think in terms of sexuality and preferences, women as a group tend to require more affiliation and closeness with their sexual partner. When serial sexual offending occurs, it’s normally from deviant sexual arousal.
“Female child sex abuse is something we really need to open our eyes and ears to.”
Nina Burrowes

“They [typically men] are either strongly attracted to children and want more variety or they’re aroused by violence, like serial rapists. Women’s sexual patterns don’t work quite the same way.”
The only worry is that this could change. Tony Beech, criminological psychology professor at the University of Birmingham says that women don’t commit as many crimes as men but they might, very gradually, start catching up.
“Women seem to be more like men these days,” he explains, referencing a recent rise in drinking and violence. That wouldn’t necessarily affect their chances of becoming paedophiles, which is based on sexual attraction to children, but it could mean an increase in women being sexually violent towards children.
It’s why, as Burrowes says, society needs to start recognising and believing that women can be child sex abusers too: “It’s something we really need to open our eyes and ears to.”

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