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‘Epidemic’ of online child porn… WELL WHAT THE FUCK IS CAUSING IT???

“Right, I was warned years ago “You take on the British nonce, you’re up against an army”… I didn’t believe it!

There is literally an army of paedophiles in the UK! (shit load of them women!)… I honestly thought the British public would take a stand against this sort of thing… I am absolutely horrified at what I’m witnessing!

SOMETHING HAS GONE SERIOUSLY WRONG IN THE UK!

There must be an underlying cause, in terms of society as a whole, for this to flourish right under our noses. To be allowed to flourish. It’s being described as an ‘epidemic’… this is a national health concern!

The UK  had a few paedophile Prime Ministers, people in and around ‘The Establishment’, some Masonic Lodges, MI6 and MI5 where involved in some pretty sick shit… but this is a nationwide epidemic at a societal level! … ‘peado Britain’

I’m all for looking for combative measures, taking the stuff down, catching those who engage in it… EDUCATION IS THE KEY! Educate as young as possible, educate the fucking parents as well … but psychologists and sociologists must be thinking of what the fuck the underlying cause of this actually is!

brit1
The Sun and The Mail described it as ‘The sickest game ever’… EVER! … I have a copy! 😀 Limited Edition of only 2000 … I have #007! 🙂

The UK is the third worst offender in the world! 700% increase in adults viewing child porn… the countries fucked.

What’s Israel’s record on combating it? What measures you got in place? Statistics?
“In Israel it’s illegal NOT to report child abuse!” 😀

Whatsapp Used for Child Pornography, Online Safety Company Warns
Israel-based AntiToxin has identified more than 1300 videos and photographs of minors involved in sexual acts on WhatsApp groups.
Israeli online safety startup AntiToxin Technologies has discovered a far-reaching phenomenon in which individuals from around the world are using open WhatsApp groups to share and view child pornography.
AntiToxin has identified more than 1300 videos and photographs of minors involved in sexual acts on WhatsApp groups, AntiToxin co-founder and CEO Zohar Levkovitz said in a statement.

Charity reports rise in takedowns of child abuse imagery

Internet Watch Foundation removed more than 100,000 pages last year, up by a third

A charity tasked with removing child abuse imagery from the internet has warned of a “horrifying” increase in the amount of material it has had to take down over the past year.
The Internet Watch Foundation, which acts as a de facto watchdog for online child abuse in the UK, said it removed more than 100,000 webpages showing the sexual abuse and sexual torture of children in 2018, an increase of one-third over the year before.
The IWF usually publishes its annual findings in April but brought forward the release this year because it felt the increase was too significant to withhold.

The charity’s chief executive, Susan Hargreaves, said: “These 105,047 webpages each contained up to thousands of images and videos showing the sexual abuse of children. It amounted to millions of horrific images. Virtually all (more than 99%) were hosted outside of the UK.

“It is shocking and deeply upsetting that these images should have been created in the first place. We have set ourselves an ambitious programme of work for 2019. By getting better at finding and combating this material, we offer real hope to the victims whose images are shared online.”
The IWF said four in 10 of the webpages it flagged for removal in 2018 displayed the sexual abuse of children aged 10 and younger, with infants and babies featuring more than 1,300 times.
Five years ago the IWF processed just over 50,000 reports, acting on a quarter of them. Last year there were more than 250,000 reports, and a higher proportion of them were found to be actionable.
Sajid Javid, the home secretary, called on internet companies to take on more of the work themselves.
“The horrifying amount of online child sexual abuse material removed by the IWF shows the true scale of the vile threat we are facing. This is why I have made tackling it one of my personal missions,” he said. “I welcome [the IWF’s] impressive work and have been encouraged by the progress being made by the tech companies in the fight against online predators. But l want the web giants to do more to make their platforms safe.”
When an image depicting child abuse is flagged for removal by the IWF, a record of the file is created, known as a hash, which can be matched automatically to future attempts to upload the same picture on social networks and photo sharing sites.
The IWF says it has created more than 320,000 unique hashes since it began using the technology. The company also operates a blacklist of URLs that contain child abuse imagery, which is distributed to British internet service providers which in turn block the sites on a voluntary basis.
The charity also relies on the manual work of 13 human reviewers, who operate under a memorandum of understanding from the Association of Chief Police Officers, which provides them with protection from the legal consequences of accessing child abuse images.
Catherine, one of the IWF’s analysts, said: “We’ve seen a huge rise in child abuse imagery captured by webcams this year. On commercial sites, where an offender could be making a profit from the material, the ages of the children appear to be getting younger. This certainly makes you more aware of online safety and that’s a message I’m happy to share.”
People who are worried about a sexual image or video online of someone who may be under 18 can make an anonymous report on the IWF’s website.

Massive increase in web pages of child abuse being identified and removed from the internet

Campaigners say tech companies need to do much more to stop images of abuse being posted in the first place.

More than 100,000 web pages of children being abused were removed from the internet last year – a third more than in 2017.
The Internet Watch Foundation (IWF), which says its vision is to “eliminate child sexual abuse imagery online”, looks into reports made by members of the public who have stumbled across images they think might be illegal.

It also proactively searches for offending sites.
Of the material taken down last year as a result of the IWF’s work, 1,300 pages showed abuse of infants or babies and more than 40,000 depicted abuse or sexual torture of children under 10.
Some pages contained thousands of pictures and videos, amounting to millions of images in total, with virtually all hosted outside the UK.

The harrowing work of the IWF is carried out by analysts who view and assess every page that might contain abuse.

Their reports are passed to the police and internet companies who then act to close down the sites.

Due to the nature of their work the analysts are understandably guarded about revealing their identities.
“Isobel”, not her real name, has worked for the IWF for six years. She said: “If you ask any analyst, they know it’s a hard job.
“We know these are real victims, it’s a real person that has been affected.
“Something that we do, is that we never listen to the audio on a video unless we have to – it makes it more real.
“Although we want to keep a distance we still realise that behind every image is a child.”
New technology has allowed the analysts to work faster, increasing the number of pages removed.
The “hashing” system creates a unique code or digital ‘fingerprint’ for an individual image which then means copies can be easily traced and removed.
An intelligent web “crawler” that systematically browses the internet makes the scanning of offending sites much faster.
“We’re finding more,” says “Paul”, another analyst. He added: “I believe if we had more analysts we’d find more, it’s everywhere, in all places, not just hidden away in dark corners, we’re becoming far better at finding it.”
Despite the rise in the number of images taken down, it is almost impossible to know if there is an increase in the content is being created.
To try to cut off the flow of material at source the IWF says it will step up its work with internet companies, using its expertise on prevention, rather than just reacting after material has been posted.
But campaigners argue that the tech giants should already be doing more.
Donald Findlater, director of Stop It Now, said: “People viewing sexual images of children online or indeed of grooming of children online, happens through the various platforms that they offer.
“That being the case they must then have the responsibility to proactively do something about that.
“They may not want to be dead visible about that, but the scale of the problem is such that they need to be a bigger part of the solution than they’ve been in the past.”

Chief constable demands more from firms to rid internet of child abuse

One of the region’s top police officers has demanded more action from internet firms after web analysts intercepted record numbers of child abuse sites.

Norfolk’s Chief Constable Simon Bailey said companies had a “social responsibility” to do more, after the Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) flagged 105,047 pages for removal in 2018 – each containing up to thousands of images and videos, and almost all (more than 99%) hosted abroad.
Susie Hargreaves OBE, head of the Cambridge charity, which identified a third more pages than during 2017, said ‘intelligent crawler’ technology and a bespoke report management system had enabled images to be processed quicker and in greater volume, but that a team of 13 analysts still had to verify each page.
Although the IWF works with more than 140 internet companies to keep their networks safe, Ms Hargreaves said most pages identified last year (82%) were from overseas image hosting sites with “little regard for relieving the suffering of child victims”.
Mr Bailey, child protection lead for the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC), which supports the work of the IWF, said: “The abuse of children online is abhorrent and tackling this threat is a priority for policing.
“The response from law enforcement in the UK to the sexual abuse of children is one of the most robust in the world.
“In co-ordinated activity by the National Crime Agency and police, about 400 people are arrested in the UK every month for child sexual abuse and exploitation offences, and more than 500 children are safeguarded.
“More must be done to stop abuse happening in the first place.
“All those with contact with children need to play their part in keeping them safe – particularly parents talking to children about healthy relationships and the risks online.
“Internet companies need to acknowledge their social responsibility and do far more to stop access to sexual abuse images and videos and prevent abuse happening on their platforms.
“This would enable police to pursue offenders who pose the most harm to children and are using sophisticated technology to evade detection.”
Home Secretary Sajid Javid praised the IWF’s work and said he was encouraged by the progress of tech companies, but requested more from web giants to make platforms safe.

Middle class children are being tricked into filming themselves naked, child abuse watchdog warns as it reveals 105,000 images were taken offline last year

More than 100,000 web pages featuring child sex abuse shut down last year
Abuse watchdog said paedophiles now targeting middle-class kids aged 11 to 13
They’re being duped into filming themselves on web cams and smartphones

More than 100,000 web pages featuring child sex abuse were shut down last year – a rise of a third in just twelve months.
The Internet Watch Foundation – Britain’s online child abuse watchdog – last night revealed that between them the pages hosted more than a million images and videos.
And it warned that predatory paedophiles are increasingly manipulating middle-class children – usually girls aged 11 to 13 – into posting highly sexualised selfies, with one in four of those it removed over the past six months ‘self-generated’ by victims.

In the vast majority of cases they were physically alone but had been duped into filming themselves on smartphones or web cams on their laptops. Many show victims’ toys in the background, and in some videos family members can be heard calling them down to dinner, oblivious to the fact the child is being violated.
Susie Hargreaves, who leads the IWF charity, warned that parents are wrong to assume their children are safe in their rooms. ‘It’s children in nice bedrooms. It is a middle-class problem,’ she said. ‘Lots of middle-class children have laptops.
Not every poor kid has. Parents need to know what their children are doing in their bedrooms. They think, “Oh, it won’t happen to us” – that notion of “well, there is no point really having parental controls on and actually it’s too much hassle.” The internet is potentially a very scary, dangerous place if people don’t protect themselves online.’

The Mail’s ‘Block Online Porn’ campaign has called for broadband providers to switch on web filters by default, meaning parents have to choose to have restrictions lifted. Around 1,300 of the web pages removed by the IWF last year featured babies and children under two. Nearly half (44 per cent) of the content featured ‘category A’ and ‘category B’ sexual abuse – which includes rape and sexual torture.
The IWF said more than three-quarters of the self- generated images feature children aged between 11 and 13. The vast majority – 80 per cent – are girls.
Miss Hargreaves said she is ‘extremely worried’ about this age group. She added: ‘They’re very vulnerable. Lots of stuff’s going on with them and they are very open to coercion and being groomed.’

The IWF would not name sites where the abuse was taking place but warned it could happen on any platform which allowed video to be live-streamed – including web giants such as Facebook, Instagram and Live.me.
Less than 1 per cent of the child sex abuse material that IWF removed last year was hosted on servers in Britain. Nearly half was based in Amsterdam, some 13 per cent in the US and 12 per cent in Russia.
Responding to the figures, Home Secretary Sajid Javid said he wanted internet companies to do more to improve online safety.
‘The horrifying amount of online child sexual abuse material removed by the IWF shows the true scale of the vile threat we are facing,’ he said. ‘I want the web giants to do more to make their platforms safe.’

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