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New Brilliant Iron Molecule May Be the Key to Cheap Solar Energy (Woolsey? Langley?… Anyone? ;D)

“The novel molecule can function both as a photocatalyst to produce fuel and in solar cells to produce electricity, replacing the expensive and rare metals in use today.”

“Can it be patented by the U.S?”

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Well apart from the CIA… high ranking CIA… no-one is taking any fucking notice!.. … c’mon now boys I play the game! 😉

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New Brilliant Iron Molecule May Be the Key to Cheap Solar Energy

The novel molecule can function both as a photocatalyst to produce fuel and in solar cells to produce electricity, replacing the expensive and rare metals in use today.

Scientists are looking at some of the most unlikely sources for energy production, partly motivated by academic and research objectives, and partly to create a new framework of energy production and extraction.

Though some raise eyebrows due to perceived feasibility challenges like China’s artificial sun ambitions, or the device that was developed to convert exhaust into renewable energy, the sheer number of examples of creative energy generation are truly inspiring.
Now, researchers have produced an iron molecule with photocatalytic promise, and it could provide large benefits in terms of both (1) electricity generation in solar cells and (2) fuel production. As iron is a more plentiful and cheaper to supply source of metal, this will also have an impact in the industry.

Advanced Molecule Design Leads to Progress

A growing body of research in the last decade has shown the strong potential that other metals can have in photocatalysis, with scientists focusing on iridium and ruthenium more and more “due to the access they provide to new synthetic spaces through new reaction mechanisms”. The challenge, however, lies in how rare they both are.

The team produced its results by altering their approach to the molecular coordination, which allowed them to create an iron molecule that resulted in iron-based light that was observable at room temperature, a first in science, although their work builds on previous studies in the same area.

“The good result depends on the fact that we have optimized the molecular structure around the iron atom”, explains colleague Petter Persson of Lund University, who was also part of the study.

Next Steps in the Research

A revised, or expanded, roadmap of solar energy production could be in the works, according to the researchers. This could also mean developments in another number of areas which rely on iron molecules.

“Our results now show that by using advanced molecule design, it is possible to replace the rare metals with iron, which is common in the Earth’s crust and therefore cheap”, says Chemistry Professor Kenneth Wärnmark of Lund University in Sweden.

Beyond the promising potential of the iron molecule, the fact that the breakthrough came now is what surprised the researchers the most. Wärnmark summed it up best when he said, “We believed it would take at least ten years.”

Still one wonders, however if, given the rate at which we are consuming materials, that one day a similar team will be announcing a cheaper alternative to the very rare iron.
This research serves as good news in the sense that, although we are aware of the powerful and undeniable benefits of solar energy, we must also ensure that the materials behind the technology also support a realistic and sustainable vision. With no end in sight to the momentum behind solar energy, this breakthrough is an important step.

Details about the study appear in a paper, titled “Luminescence and reactivity of a charge-transfer excited iron complex with nanosecond lifetime”, which was published November 29th in the Science journal.

Brilliant iron molecule could provide cheaper solar energy

For the first time, researchers have succeeded in creating an iron molecule that can function both as a photocatalyst to produce fuel and in solar cells to produce electricity. The results indicate that the iron molecule could replace the more expensive and rarer metals used today.

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The new molecule…

Some photocatalysts and solar cells are based on a technology that involves molecules containing metals, known as metal complexes. The task of the metal complexes in this context is to absorb solar rays and utilise their energy. The metals in these molecules pose a major problem, however, as they are rare and expensive metals, such as the noble metals ruthenium, osmium and iridium.

“Our results now show that by using advanced molecule design, it is possible to replace the rare metals with iron, which is common in the Earth’s crust and therefore cheap”, says Chemistry Professor Kenneth Wärnmark of Lund University in Sweden.

Together with colleagues, Kenneth Wärnmark has for a long time worked to find alternatives to the expensive metals. The researchers focused on iron which, with its six per cent prevalence in the Earth’s crust, is significantly easier to source. The researchers have produced their own iron-based molecules whose potential for use in solar energy applications has been proven in previous studies.

In this new study, the researchers have moved one step further and developed a new iron-based molecule with the ability to capture and utilise the energy of solar light for a sufficiently long time for it to react with another molecule. The new iron molecule also has the ability to glow long enough to enable researchers to see iron-based light with the naked eye at room temperature for the first time.

“The good result depends on the fact that we have optimised the molecular structure around the iron atom”, explains colleague Petter Persson of Lund University.

The study is now published in the journal Science. According to the researchers, the iron molecule in question could be used in new types of photocatalysts for the production of solar fuel, either as hydrogen through water splitting or as methanol from carbon dioxide. Furthermore, the new findings open up other potential areas of application for iron molecules, e.g. as materials in light diodes (LEDs).

What surprised the Lund researchers is that they arrived at good results so quickly. In just over five years, they succeeded in making iron interesting for photochemical applications, with properties largely as good as those of the best noble metals.

“We believed it would take at least ten years”, says Kenneth Wärnmark.

Besides the researchers from Lund University, colleagues from Uppsala University and the University of Copenhagen were also involved in the collaboration.

Publication: Luminescence and reactivity of a charge-transfer excited iron complex with nanosecond lifetime

Brilliant iron molecule could provide cheaper solar energy

Lund University

For the first time, researchers have succeeded in creating an iron molecule that can function both as a photocatalyst to produce fuel and in solar cells to produce electricity. The results indicate that the iron molecule could replace the more expensive and rarer metals used today.

Some photocatalysts and solar cells are based on a technology that involves molecules containing metals, known as metal complexes. The task of the metal complexes in this context is to absorb solar rays and utilise their energy. The metals in these molecules pose a major problem, however, as they are rare and expensive metals, such as the noble metals ruthenium, osmium and iridium.

“Our results now show that by using advanced molecule design, it is possible to replace the rare metals with iron, which is common in the Earth’s crust and therefore cheap”, says Chemistry Professor Kenneth Wärnmark of Lund University in Sweden.

Together with colleagues, Kenneth Wärnmark has for a long time worked to find alternatives to the expensive metals. The researchers focused on iron which, with its six per cent prevalence in the Earth’s crust, is significantly easier to source. The researchers have produced their own iron-based molecules whose potential for use in solar energy applications has been proven in previous studies.

In this new study, the researchers have moved one step further and developed a new iron-based molecule with the ability to capture and utilise the energy of solar light for a sufficiently long time for it to react with another molecule. The new iron molecule also has the ability to glow long enough to enable researchers to see iron-based light with the naked eye at room temperature for the first time.

“The good result depends on the fact that we have optimised the molecular structure around the iron atom”, explains colleague Petter Persson of Lund University.
The study is now published in the journal Science. According to the researchers, the iron molecule in question could be used in new types of photocatalysts for the production of solar fuel, either as hydrogen through water splitting or as methanol from carbon dioxide. Furthermore, the new findings open up other potential areas of application for iron molecules, e.g. as materials in light diodes (LEDs).

What surprised the Lund researchers is that they arrived at good results so quickly. In just over five years, they succeeded in making iron interesting for photochemical applications, with properties largely as good as those of the best noble metals.
“We believed it would take at least ten years”, says Kenneth Wärnmark.

###

Besides the researchers from Lund University, colleagues from Uppsala University and the University of Copenhagen were also involved in the collaboration.

 

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Ayahuasca recognized by the Parliament of World Religions

“Ayahuasca was recently recognised by the Parliament of World Religions”
“Really? Awesome!”

“ayahuasca spirituality has recently been recognized by the Parliament of World Religions—a gathering of 10,000 people of 200 faiths—which until 2018, had never had indigenous Amazonians in attendance.” – Is Ayahuasca Mainstream Now?


What they should do is invite themselves to the Palace of Peace and Reconciliation! 😀
Representatives meet every three years to discuss… things? It was built to host representatives of the worlds religions and faiths… … and me! 🙂
(THEY EVEN HAVE A RAINFOREST AT THE TOP!)

“It was first opened to host the Congress of Leaders of World and Traditional Religions. The building contains rooms for different belief systems such as Judaism, Islam, Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism and other religions. In addition, there lies an opera house, a museum of culture, a university, a library and a research centre. Two hundred delegates of the world’s main religions meet there every three years in a central circular chamber. This impressive building really must be seen to be believed.” 

Palace of Peace and Reconciliation

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Religious Heads Call For End To “Manipulation Of Religion” By Terrorists

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Now don’t try to kid me, Langley. I’ll make a deal with you (lay the secret on cuz)

Now I’m the king of the swingers, oh
The jungle VIP
I’ve reached the top and had to stop
And that’s what botherin’ me
I wanna be more than a man, Langley
And stroll right out of London town
And be just like the other suites
I’m tired of monkeyin’ around!

(now here’s your part of the deal cuz
lay the secret on me, of hydrino power)

Now don’t try to kid me, Langley
I’ll make a deal with you
What I desire is the suns hydrino fire
To make my dream come true
Now, give me the secret, Langley
Come on, clue me what to do
Give me the power of the suns hydrino shower
So I can be like you!

elec

CIA_headquarters

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evo fire

toscaenergy planet

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Quantum of Solace?… President Trump has signed a $1.2 billon law to boost (imaginary) US quantum tech

“Our species has failed! There is no doubt in my mind that the human species has absolutely failed… seven billion people collectively living in a fucking fantasy world of make believe! 😀  A civilisation with serious mental health issues… INSANE!!!
Quantum Physics is not ‘the most successful scientific theory ever developed’… it’s a mental illness!

And only Trump could sign Quantum Mechanics into law!
Bill Announcement
Issued on: December 21, 2018
H.R. 6227, the “National Quantum Initiative Act,” which establishes a National Quantum Initiative Program to accelerate the development of quantum information science and its technology applications;

(I’m going back to the Amazon to drink Ayahuasca if ‘anyone’ is interested)

Either that or there is actually a strategic military plan to all this? I mean, in terms of America deceiving it’s rivals into aimlessly pursuing Quantum? (China)… … that and the fact once quantum physics is exposed as scientific fraud, the ENTIRE global power structure (monetary and energy) could potentially collapse… the way I see it is… pursuing Quantum could very well spell the end of our species!

President Trump has signed a $1.2 billon law to boost US quantum tech

The new National Quantum Initiative Act will give America a national master plan for advancing quantum technologies.

The news: The US president just signed into law a bill that commits the government to providing $1.2 billion to fund activities promoting quantum information science over an initial five-year period. The new law, which was signed just as a partial US government shutdown began, will provide a significant boost to research, and to efforts to develop a future quantum workforce in the country.

The background: Quantum computers leverage exotic phenomena from quantum physics to produce exponential leaps in computing power. The hope is that these machines will ultimately be able to outstrip even the most powerful classical supercomputers. Those same quantum phenomena can also be tapped to create highly secure communications networks and other advances.

China, which has been investing heavily in quantum technology, sees the field as an opportunity to leapfrog the US. The European Union has also launched a €1 billion ($1.1 billion) quantum master plan. America has a long history of investing in quantum science, but it’s lacked a comprehensive strategy for coordinating research efforts. The new legislation, which has strong bipartisan support in Congress, should help fix that.

The details: The act establishes a National Quantum Coordination Office that will be part of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. It also calls for the development of a multi-year strategic plan to help keep America at the forefront of the quantum revolution.
One important aim of the plan will be to create new research centers that bring together academics from different disciplines, such as computer science, physics, and engineering, to help conduct experiments and train future quantum researchers. It will also encourage large companies and startups to pool some of their knowledge and resources in joint research efforts with government institutes.

US Passes Bill to Inject $1.2 Billion Into the Quantum Tech Race

President Donald Trump signed a bill last week providing over a billion dollars in funding to quantum research.

After more than three decades of research and work, scientists and tech companies have finally begun to develop technology that operates based on the mathematics of fundamental particles. Though these devices are rudimentary today, they could eventually offer impressive new computing capabilities and even threaten present-day cybersecurity. The new law, called the National Quantum Initiative Act, allocates up to $1.2 billion in funding to keep American quantum information science competitive on the global scale.

Quantum mechanics is the set of rules by which fundamental particles like electrons interact with each other. Subatomic particles take on particle and wave properties simultaneously while they’re interacting—though they turn back into particles (or waves) once they’re observed. This means that they can enter superpositions, taking on multiple locations or identities at the same time; interfere, making some of these locations or identities more or less likely upon observation; and entangle, meaning multiple particles’ properties become correlated regardless of the distance between them. Quantum information science applies these rules to storing, transmitting, and computing with data, as well as making measurements.

Governments are interested in quantum research because a computer based on the fundamentals of quantum physics, called a quantum computer, could run an algorithm that factors numbers far more efficiently than a classical computer can. Such an algorithm would break the encryption that protects much of our data, and therefore would pose a national security threat. Quantum technology could even be useful in war, via the creation of state-of-the-art positioning systems. The technology may also have societal benefits—a quantum computer might one day beat a classical computer at simulating complex molecules for medical applications, for example.

The bill was one of two first introduced over the summer, and creates quantum infrastructure, including a National Quantum Coordination Office, a Subcommittee on Quantum Information Science, and a National Quantum Initiative Advisory Committee. It includes directives and $80,000,000 per year in funding from 2019 to 2023 for the National Institute of Standards and Technology. It directs the National Science Foundation to create “at least 2, but not more than 5, Multidisciplinary Centers for Quantum Research and Education,” each of which would receive $10,000,000 per year from 2019 to 2023. And it directs the Department of Energy to create “at least 2, but not more than 5, National Quantum Information Science Research Centers,” each of which would receive $25,000,000 per year during the same period.

It’s meant to serve as a coordinated effort to advance quantum science in the U.S., as the European Union and China have done. Some have pitched the race between other countries (especially China) and the United States to advance quantum technology as the next space race.

The bill highlights training scientists and a multidisciplinary approach—after all, the first quantum computers came about using the same biochemistry techniques employed by MRI machines. It mentions the Department of Defense only once, in an advisory role, despite the department funding early quantum computing efforts and concerns about the cybersecurity threats posed by quantum computing.

Despite promises, it’s still unclear as to when we’ll see real quantum applications that beat existing technology. And of course, nothing is happening so long as the government is shut down.

Congress Passes $1.2 Billion Quantum Computing Bill

If there’s one thing U.S. politicians can almost unanimously agree on, it’s apparently the importance of quantum computing.
On Wednesday, the U.S. House of Representatives voted 348-11 to pass the National Quantum Initiative Act, a bill designed to streamline and accelerate the nation’s quantum computing efforts. The bill had already received unanimous approval in the Senate, and its next stop is the desk of President Donald Trump, who is expected to sign the act into law.
If that happens, the U.S. will devote more than $1.2 billion to quantum computing research and development over the next five years.

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Hundreds of sexual harassment claims against male police officers

“Here… the UK police have just covered up decades of child sexual abuse, their corrupt as fuck answering to a banking elite, countless of cases of male officers STALKING and RAPING vulnerable women… … yeah we imagine sexual harassment is a slight problem for UK forces!”

“Please welcome Petey the sexual harassment panda…

Hundreds of sexual harassment claims against male police officers

Guardian investigation shows fraction of complaints over past six years led to dismissal

pol7 - CopyMore than half of British police forces received almost 450 complaints from staff and members of the public about sexual harassment.

Hundreds of people have claimed they were sexually harassed by male police officers in the past six years, prompting calls from senior officers for outdated and unacceptable behaviour to be “rooted out”.

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A Guardian investigation using freedom of information laws has revealed that more than half of British police forces received almost 450 complaints from staff and members of the public about sexual harassment. They included accusations against senior detectives and inspectors.
Yet a fraction of the cases led to dismissal, with a number of cases simply resulting in an officer resigning or retiring.

The true number of harassment grievances was likely to be even higher as only 28 out of 43 police forces provided data, with many – including the Metropolitan police – claiming they were unable to supply information or had failed to respond within the time limit.

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The National Police Chiefs’ Council lead for professional ethics, Julian Williams, a chief constable, said sexual harassment must be rooted out.

“This behaviour falls short of the high standards set in the code of ethics, which each member of the policing profession is expected to uphold. Where predatory behaviour exists, it requires the strongest response from policing, including the removal of individuals from the service,” he said.
One female police officer, speaking anonymously, said: “Most female police officers have had an experience of sexual harassment. We are talking about a whole spectrum of issues, from inappropriate comments or sexism. It’s a problem that won’t go away from this field of work and I am not sure why that is.”
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The officer said she had to report a colleague in an old job. “The backlash I got from colleagues has put me off the idea of reporting it again … It happened when I was very new to a force, a male colleague was inappropriate. We had to crew-up on nights and he’d put his arms around my tummy and make comments. I reported it to my inspector, and other girls had came forward with similar issues so he lost his job … He had friends on rota and some said it was my fault and that I should not speak out of turn.”
She added that when she started somewhere else a female manager made a point of saying that if she ever had a problem with male members of staff she should talk to someone.
“It was a weird thing to say. In any force you will have one or two managers who have a reputation for using their power [over women] … but that’s probably the case in all professions. What makes it worse in policing is that as a profession we should know better. We are often dealing with vulnerable people and criminals. We are supposed to look after people.”
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Unison’s national officer, Ben Priestley, said: “This behaviour has no place in the modern workplace. Neither staff nor the public should ever feel intimidated or degraded when dealing with the police. This goes against the very purpose of having police forces watching over and keeping communities safe.”
He added that the figures mirrored the trade union’s findings. A Unison survey of almost 1,800 police staff in England, Wales and Scotland, found half had heard sexualised jokes and one in five had received a sexually explicit email or text from a colleague.

About one in 25 said they had been pressured to have sex, and one in 12 was told that sexual favours could result in preferential treatment.

Prof Jennifer Brown, from the Mannheim centre for criminology at the London School of Economics, who led Unison’s research in this area, described it as a “hidden problem” in the police force.
Brown said research suggested sexual harassment tended to be more of an issue in uniformed services, such as the police. “It’s partly because of the gender ratio, more men in the working environment and sexual politics, so the idea that women are encroaching into areas that men have a monopoly over.”
Women constitute 29.8% of the police establishment in England and Wales, with 6,463 holding the rank of sergeant or above. This is 17.7% of the complement of serving female police officers (the equivalent percentage for male officers is 24.1%).
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Brown said police fit in the top end of the reported ranges for harassment, but she added: “Interestingly, a different rate goes on [when it comes to] willingness to make a formal complaint … so it is not something people do easily or comfortably. I am not saying the police are necessarily hugely worse than other industries, but reporting rates tend to be a bit higher and you may expect a certain standard from the police.
“If their job is safeguarding you would like to think that the standards of behaviour from their own workforce is the highest.”
Data has shown 24 police staff, including constables, community support officers, crime scene investigators, clerks and detention officers were dismissed and 74 faced management action. A total of 48 staff members resigned or retired after a complaint was lodged.
Concern was also raised about the system in place to deal with harassment, with Brown saying it was not like other professions, such as nursing, where an independent team would hear a complaint.
She said: “It’s dealt with internally, so officers can resign before they are asked to appear before a disciplinary body. They may make a calculation – due to pension etc – that it is in their interest to go and so they may resign rather than be disciplined.
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“It’s a messy landscape which should be overhauled but in the current climate I am not sure there is appetite to do that.”
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