Anti-gravity, Astro-biology, astro-physics, Chemistry, cosmology, Dark Matter, DNA, Futurism, Genetics, GUT-CP, hydrides, hydrino, HydrinoDollars, HydrinoEconomy, Molecular modelling, New elements, particle physics, Philosophy, physics, technology

Israel is going to Moon!… Israeli STEM education (Science, Engineering, Technology & Mathematics)… for kindergarteners!

“Never know… … the first man to step foot on the Moon might just be Jewish!” ;D

“The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing. One cannot help but be in awe, contemplating the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvellous structure of reality. It is enough if one tries merely to understand a little of this mystery every day.” – Albert Einstein

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“STEM? What in the UK?… most kindergarten and nursery teachers in the UK are fucking illiterate mate!… … most UK high school teachers are suicidal”

“Some of you can see where I’m going with this can’t you!” 😀

Science Minister:

‘National pride’ in Israel’s first lunar landing mission

Akunis visits plant building 1st Israeli spacecraft to moon; ‘I’ve no doubt joy of all Israeli citizens will be felt when ship lifts off.’

Science Minister Ophir Akunis, Science Ministry Director-General Ran Bar, and Israel Aerospace Agency Director Avi Blassberger visited the plant where the first Israeli spacecraft to reach the moon is being built.

The project has so far been funded primarily by donations from private individuals, led by philanthropist Maurice Kahn and Dr. Miri and Sheldon Adelson.

Recently, however, the Science Ministry announced government support for the SpaceIL project in the amount of up to NIS 7.5 million.

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Science Minister Ophir Akunis, Science Ministry Director-General Ran Bar, and Israel Aerospace Agency Director Avi Blassberger visited the plant where the first Israeli spacecraft to reach the moon is being built.

The project has so far been funded primarily by donations from private individuals, led by philanthropist Maurice Kahn and Dr. Miri and Sheldon Adelson.

Recently, however, the Science Ministry announced government support for the SpaceIL project in the amount of up to NIS 7.5 million.

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Here’s (almost) everything you need to know about Israel’s Moon lander

An Israeli spacecraft is gearing up for a 2019 Moon mission that features unique partnerships, investigation of the Moon’s origin, and closure for an 11-year-old contest designed to spur commercial lunar activities.

SpaceIL, a privately funded Israeli non-profit, designed and built a four-legged lander that will touch down in Mare Serenitatis, one of the dark, lunar basins visible to the naked eye from Earth. The craft, which weighs less than 200 kilograms without fuel, will send home high-definition pictures and video before hopping to a new landing spot half a kilometer away. If successful, the mission will make Israel the fourth country to soft-land on the Moon, following Russia, the United States, and China.

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The overall purpose of the mission, SpaceIL says, is to inspire more Israelis to pursue STEM careers. Three engineers formed the non-profit in 2011 to compete for the Google Lunar X-Prize, a $30 million contest encouraging privately funded groups to land on the Moon. The first team to land, travel 500 meters and transmit imagery would have earned $20 million. A second-place team would have earned $5 million, and another $5 million was up for grabs through stretch goals like visiting an old Apollo site and contributing to STEM diversity.

Google withdrew the cash prizes in April 2018 when no group was able to meet the contest deadline, which had already been extended from 2017. A few teams, including SpaceIL, pushed on, and despite a brush with bankruptcy at the end of 2017, SpaceIL announced they would be ready to fly at the end of 2018. The launch has since been delayed until the “beginning of 2019,” SpaceIL representatives said in response to emailed questions.

The lander, which is in the process of being named through an online contest, will leave Earth aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Florida. SpaceIL is one of at least three customers with spacecraft aboard the flight. The primary payload is an Indonesian telecommunications satellite called PSN-6, built by sat-building company SSL. Another undisclosed rider rumored to be a U.S. government satellite.

Rideshare missions are common, but this one is unique because one spacecraft is headed to the Moon while two others will trek to geosynchronous orbit, a region almost 36,000 kilometers above Earth. There, satellites have one-day orbits to match Earth’s rotation, enabling them to linger over the same ground spot.

All three spacecraft will detach from the Falcon 9 into a geosynchronous transfer orbit with a high point, or apogee, of 60,000 kilometers. The SpaceIL lander will orbit Earth three times, raising its orbit until being captured by the Moon’s gravity. The process will take more than two months, and at the Moon, the lander will make two orbits before landing.

In another mission twist, Spaceflight, the company that arranged the rideshare aspect of the Falcon 9 launch, says the undisclosed satellite will remain attached to PSN-6 while both satellites head to geosynchronous orbit. Ryan Olcott, a Spaceflight mission manager, called this arrangement “groundbreaking.”

“We’re really thrilled to develop this relationship with SSL,” Olcott said. “It is a great enabler for a broad category of rideshares that would be much harder or impossible to perform with a single ring below a primary spacecraft.” The company is already offering geosynchronous ridealongs as a dedicated service for future launches.

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SpaceIL lander site
NASA / Goddard / Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter / Jason Davis / The Planetary Society

SpaceIL lander site
SpaceIL’s lander will touch down in Mare Serenitatis, the “Sea of Serenity,” shown as the larger circle. The specific landing site is in the inner circle.

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Another big partner joined the mission in October: NASA announced it would provide SpaceIL with observations from a Moon-orbiting spacecraft, a laser retroreflector for the lander, and communications support during the mission. The partnership was made under the agency’s new Lunar Discovery and Exploration Program, or LDEP, which is part of the Trump administration’s plans to return humans to the surface of the Moon.

As the SpaceIL lander descends to Mare Serenitatis, its engine will stir up the lunar soil, and NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, will use its science instruments to look for mercury and hydrogen in the dust plume. LRO has been surveying the Moon from lunar orbit since 2009.

But don’t expect any dramatic pictures of the spacecraft landing like the ones NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has captured over the years. Stephen Cole, a NASA official at the agency’s office of communications in Washington, D.C., said it’s “very unlikely” LRO will take visible light images of the landing. LRO will, however, take images afterwards to see how the lander’s descent exhaust altered the landing site.

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is giving SpaceIL a laser retroreflector array, or LRA, to install on the spacecraft — essentially an array of mirrors that reflect lasers in order to measure distance (LightSail 2 and other Earth-orbiting spacecraft carry similar arrays). There are no immediate plans to use the retroreflector; LRO has a laser altimeter, but the team actually avoids aiming it at retroreflectors left behind by the Apollo astronauts because the return signal could damage the spacecraft. Earth-bound laser stations use the Apollo retroreflectors to measure the distance to the Moon, but the SpaceIL equivalent will be too small for that.

Instead, NASA is providing the retroreflector with the future in mind. Over time, a network of similar reflectors could be built and used for navigation by spacecraft in orbit.

“Each lander that carries an LRA, we can build up a navigational system on the Moon, providing more information to orbiting satellites and future landers, both robotic and human,” said Cole.

NASA is also giving SpaceIL time on the agency’s Deep Space Network, which communicates with beyond-Earth missions via satellite dishes in California, Spain, and Australia. In return, NASA will get a copy of all the data collected by the mission’s single science instrument: a magnetometer to measure “magnetic anomalies” in Mare Serenitatis. The Soviet Union’s Luna 21 mission, which landed in the same region in 1973 and deployed the Lunakhod 2 rover, detected magnetism there.

Photo by: Eliran Avital
SpaceIL lander
SpaceIL

SpaceIL lander
The SpaceIL lander in mid-2018.

Understanding the Moon’s magnetism is key to learning about its origin. While Earth has a global magnetic field caused by the continued churning of liquid metal near the core, the Moon does not. But 3.6 billion years ago, the Moon had a magnetic field just as strong as Earth’s. When new-forming rocks solidify from their melted states, they lock in traces of the ambient magnetic field at the time. By looking at the ages of different regions and the strength of the magnetic field embedded in rocks, scientists can piece together the Moon’s history. The magnetometer data will be archived in NASA’s Planetary Data System.

SpaceIL’s mission control will be located at Israel Aerospace Industries, the country’s government-owned aerospace corporation located southeast of Tel Aviv. The mission, which now has a reported price tag of $95 million, is bankrolled by billionaire investors that include Israeli entrepreneur Morris Kahn, and U.S. business magnate Sheldon Adelson.

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SpaceIL

Education Impact

OUR VISION

SpaceIL aspires to advance the discourse on science and engineering in Israel and to acquaint the young generation with the exciting opportunities in their future, which STEM studies make possible. Through the anticipation and preparation for the historic landing on the moon of an Israeli spacecraft, our non-profit organization motivates students of all ages and sectors – both male and female – to broaden their knowledge in science, technology, engineering and mathematics; and fosters entrepreneurship, innovation, excellence and leadership. Contemplating ‘the day after’, SpaceIL strives to enhance the quality of education, to close educational gaps in the Israeli society and to provide the graduates of the educational system with the tools they will need in order to thrive in the 21st century.

The SpaceIL moon landing project serves as a source of inspiration and as fertile ground for a long-term impact on the next generation of scientists and engineers in Israel.

THE EDUCATIONAL RATIONALE:

THE FUTURE IS UNKNOWN; THE REQUIRED SKILLS ARE CLEAR

One cannot know with certainty what future the professions will be, but many believe that 80% of them will require knowledge and skills in mathematics and science. However, at present, we, as a society are not prepared for this increased demand for scientific literacy. Even today, Israel is facing a serious shortage of engineers. The number of scientists and engineers in the Israel Defense Forces, the academia and the private sector fall short of the number required to uphold the State of Israel’s technological advantage and to preserve its status as ‘the startup nation’.

From Early Learning to Workforce
The STEM Pipeline in Israel

General Overview and Rationale
According to the World Economic Forum, the world is living its Fourth industrial revolution, which is the combination of cyber-physical systems, Big Data, the Internet of Things, and the Internet of Systems. Alongside great benefits, concerns emerge such as the fact that many jobs and disciplines will disappear and automation, computers and machines will replace workers across many industries, and the gaps between the skills learned and the skills needed is growing. Excellence and literacy in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) are considered essential tools for students to measure up to the challenges of the 21st century.
This exponential change will require skills that weren’t given enough weight, if any, in teaching programs at all levels, whether at school, university or work: excellence, innovation, creativity, entrepreneurship, world experience, critical thinking, etc. In recent years key stakeholders and experts in Israel have been warning about growing shortages:
• In skilled students in the education system, as well as in the higher education system that develops STEM tracks;
• In a skilled workforce capable of fulfilling technology-based positions in the military and in industry in the next 10 years; and
• The limited scientific literacy among the general public.
STEM education has thus recently become the focus of an intensive public discussion and debate that can be gauged from increasing government attention and cross-sector initiatives.
An inter-ministerial committee headed by Israel National Economic Council outlined unequivocally the direct link between science and technology literacy at a young age, quality of high school diplomas, the number of students studying relevant fields in higher education, and the flow of a skilled workforce in knowledge-intensive industries, as well as minimizing the socio-economic gaps.

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Future Scientists – The Centre For the Gifted sand Talented
Odyssey -Academic Studies Programmes in the Sciences

General
The Odyssey Program was inspired and initiated by the late President of the State of Israel, Mr. Shimon Peres. The program was developed to nurture a unique scientific-technological group – a new generation of inventors and scientists in Israel who possess both the ability to lead and a sense of social responsibility.

The program includes academic studies in the sciences, alongside work in research laboratories. The participants acquire knowledge, skills and experience coping with complex problems, while accumulating academic credits. The program is implemented in parallel with formal studies and during vacation, the students participate in workshops and full-day intensive seminars.

The program operates through the Maimonides Fund’s Future Scientists Center, as a joint initiative with the Ministry of Education’s Department for Gifted and Talented Students and the National Cyber Bureau within the Prime Minister’s Office. Other partners in the program include the Rashi Foundation, the Jerusalem Foundation, Check Point Software Technologies Ltd., SanDisk, Mellanox Technologies, and Keter

Education for Science and Math – STEM Framework

About the Course Background
“The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing. One cannot help but be in awe, contemplating the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure of reality. It is enough if one tries merely to understand a little of this mystery every day.” – Albert Einstein In a world that is becoming increasingly complex, where global problems require multidisciplinary solutions, where citizens and communities need to be creative and analytical in the way they deal with problem solving, our education processes need to be measured not only by what we know, but also by what we can do with that knowledge and even by our ability to develop and combine this knowledge. It is more important than ever for our children and youth to be equipped with the knowledge and skills connected to the 21st century reality, where change is becoming the only constant. In this context, all learners should be prepared to think deeply and critically, to get the knowhow and the skills for creative and analytic thinking so that they have the chance to become the innovators, educators, researchers, and leaders who can solve the most pressing challenges facing our world, both today and tomorrow. These are the types of skills that students learn through Science Education using STEM as a curriculum based on the idea of educating students in four specific disciplines — science, technology, engineering and mathematics — in an interdisciplinary and applied approach. Rather than teach the four disciplines as separate and discrete subjects, STEM integrates them into a cohesive learning paradigm based on real-world applications. While it is almost impossible to list every discipline, some common areas include aerospace, astrophysics, astronomy, biochemistry, biomechanics, chemistry, biomimicry , mathematical biology, nanotechnology, neurobiology, nuclear physics, physics, and robotics, among many, many others. As evidenced by the vast variety of disciplines, it is clear that the Science Education fields affect virtually every component of our everyday lives. This new science education approach is providing the educational system with more tools for quality education, integrating knowledge and methods from different disciplines, using a real synthesis of approaches and principles that should be especially prominent: Interdisciplinary, creativity and Relevance to reality. -The STEAM approach is connecting the dots and providing education with another tool for quality education; integrating knowledge and methods from different disciplines, using a real synthesis of approaches. -In a world where technology has been integrated into our daily lives and in which global problems require multidisciplinary solutions, citizens and communities need to be creative and analytical in the way they deal with problem solving. This educational approach provides the tools for this kind
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of approach. We must give creativity the importance it deserves in order to succeed in a world where change is becoming the only constant. -What separates this approach from traditional science and math education is the blended learning environment and the manner of showing students how the scientific method should be applied to everyday life. It teaches students a different way of thinking and focuses on the real world applications of problem solving. Nowadays we add to STEM an A, for arts. The addition of the arts to the original STEM framework is important as it includes practices such as modelling, developing scientific explanations and engaging in critique, which are often underemphasized in the context of math and science education. The course designed by The Aharon Ofri MASHAV International Educational Training Center is aimed at directors of education departments in education Ministries, Principals and supervisors of primary and secondary schools; Educational staff at schools Training institutions, whose responsibilities involve the allocation of resources and development of educational policies. It is based on the vast experience the Israeli education system has acquired over the years in working towards an educational environment contributive to sustainability and globalization.

STEM Education in Israel: A Case Study

In this chapter, we review the STEM education system in Israel, including historical overview, current reforms and contemporary trends and emphasis. We also describe the research process of the risk management process presented in this Brief, including the Research Methodology (Sect. 3.2.1), Research Participants (Sect. 3.2.2) and Research Tools (Sect. 3.2.3), and the Research Process (Sect. 3.2.4).

Orit Hazzan: Research topics in

Policy of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) Education

My recent academic – research and practice – work focuses on Policy of STEM Education, including: • Cross-sector collaboration: upscale processes, collective impact, and RPP • Human resources: predictions and professional development • Strategic analysis: SWOT analysis, risk management, and change management
These topics are addressed in my academic work on K-12, academia and industry levels. Within the context of these topics, STEM education processes on the national level (beyond a specific program or initiate) are examined, in order to make a significant change in the Israeli eco-system to sustain Israel’s economic growth and development My work is largely based on my academic background in mathematics, computer science, education, and management and my acquaintance with the Israeli educational system in general and computer science education in particular, with the academia, and with the industry in Israel and its hi-tech sector. In what follows, several examples of my recent research works, projects and activities on these topics are presented.

IATI’s STEM Education Projects

In recent years we have seen a decrease in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) education in Israel. Fewer students are completing 5 units of Mathematics, Physics and Computer Science.

IATI co-leads the project, as our mission is to promote and cultivate the advanced technology industries in Israel and consequently we see great value in promoting STEM education. In order to continue being a Start-Up nation we must strengthen STEM teaching in Israel, and encourage high school students to acquire STEM knowledge.

To bridge this problem IATI is co-leading events to promote STEM Education in Israel, with Government ministries, Educational NGOs and with the High-Tech Companies.,

To find out more about how you can join us for these national efforts, please contact roni@iati,co,il.
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STEM in Israel: The Educational Foundation for ‘Start-Up Nation’

 

Israel launches STEM program for kindergartners

Why did global aerospace giant Lockheed Martin send its chief executive to a Beersheva kindergarten?

Because Lockheed Martin is a major partner in Israel’s first science-technology early education program, thus far serving 100 children. The idea is that it’s never too soon to inculcate the basics of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) to better prepare the next generation for the job market.

“The future growth of Israel’s economy will require a constant supply of highly trained, highly capable technical talent, which is why advancing STEM education is a critical focus for Lockheed Martin,” said Marillyn Hewson, Lockheed Martin chairwoman, president and CEO.

Lockheed, a large U.S. defense contractor based in Washington D.C. with a campus in Sunnyvale, is among several major multinationals that have established offices in Beersheva’s new Gav-Yam Negev Advanced Technologies Park (ATP), primarily housing companies involved in developing cyber technologies.

In 2014, Lockheed signed a memorandum of understanding with the Israeli government to help advance cyber-education in the Jewish state. Lockheed has since sponsored programs and conferences aimed at helping educators more effectively teach STEM curriculum.

Last year, Lockheed began collaborating with Israel’s Ministry of Education, Ministry of Science and the Rashi Foundation to promote STEM programs for students in kindergarten through high schools.

The new early childhood curriculum was designed to provide 300 hours of science study per year in a stimulating learning environment that allows students to experiment and to experience and develop skills through hands-on creative activities in astronomy, physics, chemistry and robotics.

Over the next three years, classrooms taking part in the project will be equipped with computers, Lego construction kits, robotics experiments and space-related content to encourage a passion for STEM, according to the Rashi Foundation, which leads national projects that bridge educational and social gaps in Israel. The joint initiative is part of the MadaKids program that aims to cultivate future scientists in Israel.

The project is operated by Beit Yatziv, an organization that runs science education programs for some 40,000 elementary school pupils across Israel on behalf of the Rashi Foundation, including a municipal science excellence center in cooperation with the municipality of Beersheva.

“The participating kindergarten teachers received special training at Beit Yatziv that focused on the science behind natural phenomena such as the seasons, astronomy, robotics and more,” said Maya Lugassi Ben-Hemo, head of pedagogy at Beit Yatziv.

In-service training and academic guidance by Kaye College of Education and the pedagogic team of Beit Yatziv will continue through the school year, she added.

Ben-Hemo emphasized that the children won’t lack time to enjoy traditional activities such as coloring and building with blocks. “The science and technology program will be integrated within the regular curriculum of the Ministry of Education for science-oriented kindergartens, which obviously includes play time,” she said.

The goal is for children participating in the program to enter elementary school with a deeper understanding of science, technology, engineering and math, and that this model for technological early childhood education will be duplicated across Israel. The program “is intended to serve as a regional learning center” for teachers, other education professionals and parents, Ben-Hemo said.

Lockheed’s Hewson was not the only big name on hand when the science kindergarten was dedicated this past October. Also in attendance were Minister of Education Naftali Bennett, Beersheva Mayor Rubik Danilovitch, Rashi Foundation chairman (and retired general) Gabi Ashkenazi, and other dignitaries from Israel and abroad.

“The significance of the knowledge the children gain in preschool will be felt in years to come, and it will surely be highly valuable on the personal as well as the national level,” Bennett said at the event. “Opening the first science kindergarten in Beersheva sends a clear message — that everyone, everywhere in Israel, should have equal opportunities.”

Ashkenazi said the Rashi Foundation views the promotion of science and technology education from an early age as a major catalyst for strengthening Israeli society and closing educational gaps between the center and periphery of the country.

“The science kindergarten in Beersheva, the capital of the Negev, is an innovative and unique project that will give children an opportunity to cultivate their independent and inquisitive thinking and make an early start on their science education,” Ashkenazi said. “This is the first step on the path that will lead them, and the country, to new achievements in science and advanced technology.”

Desperately seeking STEM: Ministry works to promote cyber-education

Israel signs second agreement with tech firm Lockheed-Martin to encourage more kids to study science and tech

But despite the best efforts of government and industry, statistics show that STEM is still a hard sell. Kids, it appears, are intimidated by math and science, and prefer “easier” subjects. It’s a major problem around the world, including in the US.

“Ninety-seven percent of US high schools do not teach STEM effectively enough to provide students with real-life skills that will enable them to get into advance tech programs in colleges,” and neither kids, parents, nor school boards are demanding those subjects, according to Rick Geritz, one of the world’s foremost experts on cyber-education.

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