CIA, GUT-CP, Humour, quantum physics, technology

The Chinese state want to take over the world using Quantum Mechanics?… good luck with that! :D (thanks Snowden!)

“I’m not being racist!… I just find the Chinese terribly annoying. Example… you’ll be walking through London, efficiently getting from A to B in a quick and orderly fashion, and the someone in front of you will just stop! Un-expectantly, for absolutely no fecking reason at all… best believe they’ll be Chinese.

And they’re always lost! Always… no fecking idea as to where they’re going! But yet they’re always looking on they’re phone… are they on Google maps or playing fecking Pokemon? :/

AND THEN! :I The most irritating thing about them, you get on a train, and thirty plus Chinese students have managed to get lost, in the middle of a single fecking carriage, complete with all their luggage… just stuck in the centre of the carriage with two pieces of  luggage each, not knowing what to do next.
“Sowwy” “Sowwy” “Sowwy”… STOP APOLOGISING AND GET THE LUGGAGE OUT THE FECKING WAY AND FIND YOU’RE FECKING SEAT!

Yeah anyway, I personally don’t believe the Chinese state has any idea that Quantum Mechanics is the biggest load of tosh of the past 100 years… they seem to be making all these fantastic claims of Quantum computing, Quantum communication, Quantum Encryption, Quantum cryptography, Quantum Satellites, … newest one being Quantum radar.

If Quantum theory is proven to be incorrect, China is going to Quantumly fucked!

I suspect the US military complex and Western Elites are secretly pissing themselves in hysterical fits of laughter (I am)… go ahead China… go build the planets biggest tin doughnut, I mean ‘supercollider’.

(It’s not like I haven’t tried telling them… they’re so bloody paranoid, they thought I trying to throw them a strawman.)

Saying that…. was Mills’ newest scientific publication not in a Chinese journal? :/

Why China’s perfectly placed to be quantum computing’s superpower

The quantum race is on. As technological advancements progress, expect nations to be more secretive about their capabilities. At the forefront is China, which is pouring billions in quantum tech.

In August 2016, China sent the world’s first quantum satellite into space from a launchpad in the Gobi Desert. Micius, which circles the earth at an altitude of 500km, is a powerful signal of intent – a starting gun for the technological race that could define the next century.

The quantum realm

In 2013, Snowden’s leaks from the NSA revealed the full extent of the US intelligence services capabilities and activities in China. Analysis by the Washington think-tank link url=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/files.cnas.org/documents/CNASReport-Quantum-Tech_FINAL.pdf?mtime=20180912133406″%5DCentre for a New American Security[/link] says these revelations spooked the Chinese government into a search for new, home-grown cybersecurity solutions.

That’s why the bulk of China’s initial progress has been in the field of secure quantum communications – through projects such as Micius, as well as a ground-based quantum network in the northern province of Shandong. “In the field of quantum communications we are ahead of our colleagues over the world,” says Pan, who has said his work was given new impetus and urgency by Snowden’s disclosures.

The U.S-China race for quantum dominance

As the U.S. and China struggle for dominance in artificial intelligence, they are locked in a parallel, behind-the-scenes race to master quantum technology, a contest that could result in lasting military superiority and a possible new industrial revolution.

The big picture: Though still far off, conquering quantum technology could enable uncrackable communications, supercharged radar and more deadly undersea warfare. And as of now, China has some serious advantages.

A new report from the Center for a New American Security draws on open-source material for a window into China’s quantum progress and aspirations.
•The report’s authors, Elsa Kania and John Costello, say that China has made substantial advances in some areas of quantum research, putting it in a position to overtake the U.S. in the science.
•Chinese advantages include a national vision for technological research, significant investments, and tight bonds between the private sector and the military. By comparison, the U.S. yet to enact a quantum policy, though the White House recently added a quantum expert to its tech-policy staff.
•”China’s advances in quantum science could impact the future military and strategic balance, perhaps even leapfrogging traditional U.S. military–technological advantages,” write Kania and Costello.

How it works: Quantum technology capitalizes on the unusual properties of super-tiny particles to surpass what’s possible with normal, or “classical,” computing. Among its applications:
•Quantum cryptography, a leap over current techniques that would be nearly impossible to crack — and render modern encryption obsolete.
•Quantum computing, which promises to enormously accelerate computing, a breakthrough whose effects would be felt across the economy.

Quantum supremacy — the moment when quantum computers will be more capable than classical ones — is still well out of reach, but researchers in both countries are pushing aggressively in that direction.
•Kania and Costello argue that Chinese progress on quantum cryptography is world-class, demonstrated by the launch of the first-ever quantum satellite in 2016.
•While China lags on research into quantum computing, it’s quickly catching up.

Among the spoils of conquering the quantum space are computers that could decipher most of the world’s encrypted data, like the NSA’s store of intercepted communications, and overcome the U.S. stealth technologies on which the military heavily relies.

How they got here: China had a “Sputnik moment” in 2013, igniting a national plan that funnels billions of dollars and top scientists into quantum research, the authors write.
•Its unlikely instigator was Edward Snowden, whose leaks revealed the extent of U.S. spying in China, and sparked a feverish response meant to shore up China’s protections against cyber-espionage.
•This inflection point mirrors another three years later: An Obama Administration report outlining a future U.S. artificial intelligence policy. Afterward, Beijing scrambled to put together its own, far outstripping American planning, while the Trump administration has neither engaged Obama’s policy nor formulated its own.

China may have developed a quantum radar that can spot stealth planes

A company claims to have created a quantum radar that can detect stealth aircraft and see through the radar jamming used to hide warplanes.

Defence giant China Electronics Technology Group Corporation displayed the prototype at the Zhuhai air show last week.

Stealth aircraft avoid detection by redirecting most of a radar system’s radio waves, which usually reflect off their surface and reveal their location.

China’s quantum development plan is aggressive, and Donald Trump wants one just like it

After breakthroughs by Chinese scientists over the past decade, Washington issues commitment to ‘maintaining American leadership in quantum information science’ (sssshhhh! This is funny! :D)

They say imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. And after observing China’s state-led push to become a world leader in the field of quantum technology, it seems the United States is about to pay Beijing a considerable compliment and follow suit.

For about a decade China has been committed to increasing its capabilities in the field. In that time it has funded major projects, brought scientists from across the country to work together and encouraged students to enter the field.

While this high level of government involvement has led to a number of breakthroughs for China, it also stands in stark contrast to the low-key approach adopted by the US in the period.

But according to a document released by Washington earlier this week, that could all be about to change.
(he he he he! sssshhh!)

China’s Quest To Become A Quantum Superpower

China’s Quantum Future

Xi’s Quest to Build a High-Tech Superpower
By Elsa B. Kania

China should be a “global leader in innovation” by 2035, President Xi Jinping declared during the Chinese Communist Party’s 19th National Congress last October. His remarks reflected a core strategic ambition: After decades of reliance upon foreign technology, Xi’s China aspires not only to catch up with the West’s technological development but to surpass it—through a national strategy for “innovation-driven” development.

China’s trajectory in quantum science—which leverages principles of quantum mechanics to create disruptive, perhaps transformative technologies—will be a key test of Xi’s ambitions. Beijing is striving to become a world leader in quantum technology through large-scale state-guided investments, which may total tens of billions of dollars in the years to come. Under its 13th five-year plan, introduced in 2016, China has launched a “megaproject” for quantum communications and computing, which aims to achieve major breakthroughs in these technologies by 2030, including the expansion of China’s national quantum communications infrastructure, the development of a general quantum computer prototype, and the construction of a practical quantum simulator. China is also building the National Laboratory for Quantum Information Sciences, which, with over $1 billion in initial funding, could emerge as a key center of gravity for future research and development.

Will China succeed in its plans to pioneer advances in quantum technology?
(probably not)

China is building a massive multi-location national-level quantum laboratory

During the 8th International Conference on Quantum Cryptography which took place in Shanghai last week, China announced to be in the progress of building a new multi-location quantum information lab, local media Yicai (in Chinese) reports.

According to the announcement, the new lab will integrate resources in different regions including Hefei in Anhui province, Shanghai, and Beijing. The lab’s branch in Hefei called the National Laboratory for Quantum Information Sciences started construction in 2017 and will cover a land area of 86 acres (362,667 square meters) by completion. It aims to accelerate quantum R&D and application with the help of University of Science and Technology of China also located in the area.

An insider from the university told Yicai that the program has received a funding of around RMB 1 billion from Anhui’s provincial government and Shanghai’s municipal government. The insider added that the state will invest over RMB 100 billion as a long-term supporter.

The Hefei lab received $10 billion from the local government in 2017, according to reports. The new RMB 1 billion is likely to be a bonus financing to upgrade existing infrastructure and enhance the connection between different branches.

In September 2017, China launched a quantum fiber link connecting four major cities: Beijing, Shanghai, Jinan, and Hefei. The link is also using China’s Micius, the world’s first quantum communication satellite. Partners of the link project include the State Grid Corporation of China, the country’s state-owned electricity utility company.

Additionally, Alibaba jointly established a Shanghai-based quantum computation lab with the Chinese Academy of Sciences. The company also participated in the International Conference on Quantum Cryptography this year.

Increasing quantum investment in Beijing, Shanghai, and Hefei area appears as a strengthening of resources and an aggressive move to accelerate the field’s development in order to stay ahead of a global game which is now led by China and the US.

On June 27 this year, the US passed the National Quantum Initiative Act (H. R. 6227), promising a 10-year federal effort to boost quantum science as well as a $1.3 billion budget to support the country’s quantum computation projects between 2019 and 2023. Prior to the Act, government investment in quantum research was around $200 million per year, according to the latest 2016 data—far behind China’s state-backed financing.

DON’T SAY NO-BODY WARNED YA CHINA!!!

Bollocks… I know who I’m answering to… The West Coast… no not the West Coast America!

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