Climate Change, Environment, Global Warming, Planet Earth, technology, Terraforming, UN

UN report on global warming/climate change… ‘unprecedented change’ needed… WE HAVE THE F*****G SOLUTION!

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“Half as many animals with back bones would lose the majority of their habitats… yeah it’s the ones without backbones that are causing this!” 😀

“Well the way I see it, in my childlike, possible undiagnosed Asperger’s mind is… if humanity has the solution to ALL of its energy needs in the form of ‘hydrino’ energy, an understanding of the atom (GUT-CP) that can save our planet from all forms of ecological catastrophe… and humanity chooses to ignore that solution for whatever reason… then they must want to burn in a global oven! 😀 They might as well burn their children, which they claim to love and care for so much, in ovens right now!”

“So according to the UN report, either human civilisation utilises and adapts to this technology, and brings forth a new technological revolution… … or humanity continues on the path its on and brings about a Mad Max style ecological apocalypse… … either way I’m happy!… … in fact?” 😀

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“That’s Mad Dan The Road Warrior… some say he saw this whole thing coming” 😀 “… and his loyal alsation companion Randy!” “After Mills?” “No, Marsh!” 😀

Scientists from UN-run climate change panel to present key global warming report for world leaders
1 October 2018 Climate Change
Scientists from the United Nations-run Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and representatives from its 195 member governments, are meeting in South Korea, to reach agreement over a key summary for policymakers into the impact of a 1.5 degree Celsius increase in global warming, above pre-industrial levels.
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UN report on global warming carries life-or-death warning
‘Not impossible but will require unprecedented changes’
Report written by 90 scientists says preventing an extra single degree of heat could drastically improve life for millions, but sees little chance of it actually happening.
WASHINGTON (AP) — Preventing an extra single degree of heat could make a life-or-death difference in the next few decades for multitudes of people and ecosystems on this fast-warming planet, an international panel of scientists reported Sunday. But they provide little hope the world will rise to the challenge.
The Nobel Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change issued its gloomy report at a meeting in Incheon, South Korea.
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We have 12 years to limit climate change catastrophe, warns UN
Urgent changes needed to cut risk of extreme heat, drought, floods and poverty, says IPCC
IPCC climate change report – live updates and reaction
The world’s leading climate scientists have warned there is only a dozen years for global warming to be kept to a maximum of 1.5C, beyond which even half a degree will significantly worsen the risks of drought, floods, extreme heat and poverty for hundreds of millions of people.
The authors of the landmark report by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released on Monday say urgent and unprecedented changes are needed to reach the target, which they say is affordable and feasible although it lies at the most ambitious end of the Paris agreement pledge to keep temperatures between 1.5C and 2C.
The half-degree difference could also prevent corals from being completely eradicated and ease pressure on the Arctic, according to the 1.5C study, which was launched after approval at a final plenary of all 195 countries in Incheon in South Korea that saw delegates hugging one another, with some in tears.
“We must reduce greenhouse gas emissions to net zero or face more floods” Nicholas Stern
“It’s a line in the sand and what it says to our species is that this is the moment and we must act now,” said Debra Roberts, a co-chair of the working group on impacts. “This is the largest clarion bell from the science community and I hope it mobilises people and dents the mood of complacency.”

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Avoiding climate chaos means ‘unprecedented’ change: UN report
The UN’s 195-nation climate science body plunged deep into overtime Saturday to finalise a report outlining stark options—all requiring a global makeover of unprecedented scale—for avoiding climate chaos.
Working through the night, the closed-door huddle in rain-soaked Incheon, South Korea, was to convene a plenary later in the day to hammer through a “Summary for Policymakers.”
Can humanity cap global warming at 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit)? What will it take and how much will it cost? Would climate impacts be significantly less severe than in a 2C world?
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was tasked with these questions by the framers of the landmark 2015 Paris Agreement, which calls for halting the rise in temperatures to “well below” 2C—and 1.5C if possible.
That aspirational goal—tacked on to the treaty at the last minute—caught climate scientists off-guard.
“Our understanding of 1.5C was very limited, all but two or three of the models we had then were based on a 2C target,” said Henri Waisman, a senior researcher at the Institute for Sustainable Development and International Relations in Paris, and one of the report’s 86 authors.
Based on more than 6,000 peer-reviewed studies, the 20-page bombshell will make for grim reading when it is released on Monday.
“Leaders will have nowhere to hide once this report comes out,” said Jennifer Morgan, Executive Director of Greenpeace International, and an observer at the talks.
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UN warns paradigm shift needed to avert global climate chaos
Avoiding global climate chaos will require a major transformation of society and the world economy that is “unprecedented in scale,” the UN said Monday in a landmark report that warns time is running out to avert disaster.
Earth’s surface has warmed one degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit)—enough to lift oceans and unleash a crescendo of deadly storms, floods and droughts—and is on track toward an unliveable 3C or 4C rise.
At current levels of greenhouse gas emissions, we could pass the 1.5C marker as early as 2030, and no later than mid-century, the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) reported with “high confidence”.
“The next few years are probably the most important in human history,” Debra Roberts, head of the Environmental Planning and Climate Protection Department in Durban, South Africa, and an IPCC co-chair, told AFP.
A Summary for Policymakers of the 400-page tome underscores how quickly global warming has outstripped humanity’s attempt to tame it, and outlines options for avoiding the worst ravages of a climate-addled future.
“We have done our job, we have now passed on the message,” Jim Skea, a professor at Imperial College London’s Centre for Environmental Policy and an IPCC co-chair, said at a press conference.clim5

UN report on global warming carries life-or-death warning

Preventing an extra single degree of heat could make a life-or-death difference in the next few decades for multitudes of people and ecosystems on this fast-warming planet, an international panel of scientists reported Sunday. But they provide little hope the world will rise to the challenge.
The Nobel Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change issued its gloomy report at a meeting in Incheon, South Korea.
In the 728-page document, the U.N. organization detailed how Earth’s weather, health and ecosystems would be in better shape if the world’s leaders could somehow limit future human-caused warming to just 0.9 degrees Fahrenheit (a half degree Celsius) from now, instead of the globally agreed-upon goal of 1.8 degrees F (1 degree C). Among other things:
Half as many people would suffer from lack of water.
There would be fewer deaths and illnesses from heat, smog and infectious diseases.
Seas would rise nearly 4 inches (0.1 meters) less.
Half as many animals with back bones and plants would lose the majority of their habitats.
There would be substantially fewer heat waves, downpours and droughts.
The West Antarctic ice sheet might not kick into irreversible melting.
And it just may be enough to save most of the world’s coral reefs from dying.

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Avoiding climate chaos means ‘unprecedented’ change:
UN report – New Delhi: The UN’s 195-nation climate science body plunged deep into overtime Saturday to finalise a report outlining stark options — all requiring a global makeover of unprecedented scale — for avoiding climate chaos.

Without a radical course change, we are headed for an unliveable 3C or 4C hike.
And yet, humanity has avoided action for so long that any pathway to a climate-safe world involves wrenching economic and social change “unprecedented in terms of scale,” the report said.
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We have 12 years to act on climate change before the world as we know it is lost. How much more urgent can it get?
Twelve years. According to climate scientists, that’s how long until we hit the 1.5C tipping point if we carry on as we are.
Such a shift in our planetary temperature will imperil not only low-lying areas because of the increased risk of floods, but will have consequences for all of us – not least due to the necessary migration of millions of people away from areas that become uninhabitable.
Coral reefs will vanish; many ancient trees will not survive; extreme weather events will become ever more common. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change paints a bleak picture.
Yet the scientists are also clear that we can still hold the line on further damaging change – if we’re prepared to act fast and invest a great deal of money. By reducing CO2 emissions by nearly half from their 2010 levels, we could give ourselves a fighting chance; by planting millions of trees and using technology to further capture carbon dioxide too, we might just do it.
But in all honesty it is hard to feel optimistic about the world’s ability to make that happen. The World Wildlife Fund’s lead climate change scientist, Chris Weber, says “the difference between possibility and impossibility is political will”, which in present circumstances is unnerving, to say the least.
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Deadline for greenhouse gas emissions revealed in UN report
The world’s most authoritative body on climate science has today issued a stark warning about the future of the planet.
More than 90 scientists have pulled together thousands of pieces of research to compile the report from the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.
The report says global emissions of greenhouse gas pollution must reach zero by about 2050, for the world to avoid the effects of extreme climate change.
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What about the Amazon?… … my Amazon! 😀
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The Amazon Used to be a Hedge Against Climate Change. Those Days May Be Over.
Direct human impacts like these have long defined the battle to save the rainforest. But Carlos Quesada, with Brazil’s National Institute for Amazonian Research, says a new threat is now looming.
“The forest is responding to the atmosphere,” he says. And the atmosphere is changing. Chainsaws and cattle are still eating away at the forest’s perimeter, but carbon dioxide coming out of tailpipes and smokestacks thousands of miles away is altering tropical forests on a much larger scale.
“So, in areas completely remote, far away from people’s influence, the forest is changing. Forests that are pristine, they are suffering.”

Quesada says all of this extra CO2 is causing global temperatures to rise on the one hand, “but on the other,” he says, “high CO2 can also stimulate growth.” Growth in trees like the ones we’re standing among. And for years, that’s what’s been happening. The Amazon and many other forests have been absorbing a lot of that extra CO2 and converting it into leaves, branches and trunks. Essentially capturing and storing pollution that would otherwise heat up the atmosphere even more. Quesada says until recently, the Amazon was hungrily absorbing the equivalent of the CO2 pollution from every car on the planet, every year.
But even a huge forest like this one can only capture so much more CO2 before it reaches other biological limits. And Quesada says the Amazon appears to have done that, and stopped sucking up extra CO2.
“So, we are changing the atmosphere,” he says. “The atmosphere is changing the climate system. And the climate system and the higher levels of CO2 are changing how the forest behaves.”
In fact, a few years back, for the first time on record, it actually released more carbon than it absorbed. It flipped from what’s known as a “carbon sink” to a source of carbon.
“It’s probably saying, ‘OK, that’s enough now — you guys stop.’”
Which, Quesada says, presents a frightening scenario.
“The Amazon was buying you some time that it is not going to buy anymore,” he says, because once that environmental service of absorbing extra CO2 from the atmosphere stops, all that extra carbon will instead accumulate in the atmosphere, driving global temperatures even higher at a much faster rate. “We will really start to feel it,” he says.

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Recent intensification of Amazon flooding extremes driven by strengthened Walker circulation
Abstract
The Amazon basin is the largest watershed on Earth. Although the variability of the Amazon hydrological cycle has been increasing since the late 1990s, its underlying causes have remained elusive. We use water levels in the Amazon River to quantify changes in extreme events and then analyze their cause. Despite continuing research emphasis on droughts, the largest change over recent decades is a marked increase in very severe floods. Increased flooding is linked to a strengthening of the Walker circulation, resulting from strong tropical Atlantic warming and tropical Pacific cooling. Atlantic warming due to combined anthropogenic and natural factors has contributed to enhance the change in atmospheric circulation. Whether this anomalous increase in flooding will last depends on the evolution of the tropical inter-ocean temperature difference.

 “See, if it boiled down to a choice between 7 billion humans and the Amazon forest… I’d easily choose the forest” 😀
“He isn’t joking on that one either!”

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